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Campaign Gettysburg Designer's Notes

Introduction

Little did I - and I'm sure John - know in 1998 when I started on this project that it would span fully 6 years in development. The result - I hope - is worth the time spent. My goal in the design of this game was to cover the campaign in the east in the summer of 1863, more so than the Battle of Gettysburg. I wanted to take gaming beyond the limits imposed by maps of single battles, encouraging gamers to deal with real life problems without the artificial constraints imposed by limited scale maps. I also wanted to do what I could to discourage various "gamey" aspects of play. I'll be interested in the reaction to my efforts in those regards.

Acknowledgements

First and foremost I have to thank John for allowing me to work on this project. He has been patient beyond belief. He has over time modified the game engine and the tools available to his designers. The end result is a product that has evolved over the years, and one that will continue to morph over time. My thanks to my family and friends who also have exhibited the patience of Job with what must have seemed at times a fantasy on my part. I know they're tired of hearing that I'm working on the game - but see, I really was! To the playtesters who have given of their time for so long, your efforts are greatly appreciated. Jim Dobbins, Drew Wagenhoffer, Pat Blackman, Lee Quantrell, Brett Schulte, Rich Walker, and Richard Hamilton - thank you - your comments and our discussions have led to a better game. Plus, I've had the chance to play this game with some great guys. In particular I need to thank Pat for his work on detailing the eastern half of Carroll County (where he grew up) on the Pipe Creek map, Drew for his work on his own PDT's that he kindly allowed me to steal, and that I have employed virtually unchanged, and Jim for playtesting with me longer than anyone else. The campaign maps by Michael Avanzini are wonderful, the getting started work done by Adam Parker shines, Mark Adams' work is stellar. All these folks who contributed to individual aspects of the game wowed me with the quality of their work, and with the rate at which they completed it. I can't thank you all enough. Of course, having thanked everyone, I must emphasize that any fault that may be found with the OOBs, scenarios, maps, etc. is mine alone.

The Campaign

I don't intend to write extensively about the campaign. I'd refer those who wish to read about this subject in depth to the sources listed in Appendix A. A brief overview relating the campaign to aspects of the game is all that I'll attempt at this point.

After Chancellorsville and Jackson's death, Lee resolved to take the war to the north. During May and early June Lee reorganized the Army of Northern Virginia. The effect of this change in command structure is one of the intriguing aspects of the campaign. He also lobbied for and got additional troops. He didn't get all the troops he'd hoped for. The possible additional forces beyond those actually received are accounted for in the game by the inclusion of an extra regiment, and extra brigade and an extra corps in the Confederate OOB.

Brandy Station:

Lee resolved on an invasion of Pennsylvania via the Valley. The southern army shifted north along the Rappahannock River. The Cavalry division massed near Brandy Station, east of Culpeper, and conducted a series of grand reviews. Shortly after the last of these the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac crossed the Rappahannock. The Battle of Brandy Station, and the start of every campaign, resulted. While a minor Confederate victory, or a draw, in campaign terms, the battle stung Stuart, and many cite it as a reason for his later ride around the Union army, and consequent absence from his real job of intelligence gathering. Stuart's absence is another major issue in the campaign.

I believe that the employment of cavalry is one of the main areas of concern in game play in this era. My hope is that the larger maps used in this game will encourage and reward employment of these troops in a more realistic fashion than that which one usually sees in current game play. You should see cavalry employed in a more traditional scouting and screening role during the games. The difference in victory points for cavalry and infantry also dictates that horse soldiers not be used as assault forces if at all possible.

In the meantime the Army of the Potomac and Hooker had to contend with a substantial decrease in strength as at least 20 regiments mustered out during June/early July of 1863. Hooker made some half hearted suggestions about taking the offensive. These were not met with any enthusiasm in Washington, neither before the campaign began, nor later as the armies maneuvered.

2nd Winchester:

After Brandy Station Ewell's 2nd Corps opened the campaign by marching into the Valley. Milroy's division of the Union 8th Corps/Department of the Middle lingered too long at Winchester, and was all but destroyed by Ewell. Just as the south's OOBs contain extra units, the Union's contain all of the 8th Corps units, and all of the 22nd Corps/Department of Washington units. Some end up coming into play, others don't.

Aldie/Middleburg/Upperville:

As Ewell's Corps continued north to the Potomac river, the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia finished shifting north from Fredericksburg, and screened the Valley from the west side of the Bull Run Mountains. The Battle's of Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville occurred at this time between Union cavalry with some limited infantry support and Stuart aided at the end by some infantry support. Upperville is not modeled in the game. Aldie and Middleburg are treated as part of a continuous flow of events in the game.

By the time of Aldie, the northern army had shifted north and screened the east slopes of the Bull Run Mountains. After the events of June 17th to the 20th, the army concentrated mostly to the east of the mountains. 1st and 3rd Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia screened the Valley, then moved to the Valley and across the Potomac. 2nd Corps moved into Pennsylvania with elements of the command moving far enough to threaten the state capitol. 1st and 3rd Corps concentrated at Chambersburg, west of a crossroads town named Gettysburg.

Stuart fell off the radar on the aforementioned ride around the Union army and the southern forces lost their eyes and ears. For the north the civilian leadership decided in a change in army command during the middle of the campaign. The contentious Hooker was relieved and replaced by Meade. His actions as army commander led to the meeting engagement at Gettysburg on July 1st.

Gettysburg:

Not the highlight of the Army of Northern Virginia's record. The command problems in the army contributed to disjointed, uncoordinated attacks. The Army of the Potomac was able to take advantage of a good defensive position after the 1st days disaster, and was able to use interior lines of communication to shift reserves to the action during the 2nd and 3rd days. July 3rd was an unmitigated disaster for the south. The game models Gettysburg (as it does for Brandy Station, Winchester, and Aldie) by providing a full range of possibilities from the starting positions on July 1st. It also provides about 20 historical scenarios from Gettysburg.

Falling Waters:

The Confederate retreat from Gettysburg went fairly unmolested - cavalry clashes culminated in a fight near Falling Waters - the Confederate supply source. The Army of the Potomac, after just surviving an epic battle, and under the command of a man new to the job, pursued its foe cautiously, which resulted in much criticism of Meade. With the Confederate army at bay with its back to a rain-swollen Potomac River, the Union army frittered away days concentrating and preparing for an attack on a prepared position. The Army of Northern Virginia improvised a pontoon bridge to replace the one that had been swept away, and crossed back into Virginia. The northern advance bagged only a portion of the rear guard.

This is where the game ends, and is as good a place as any to call a stopping point to the campaign.


Design Philosophy

I have only a couple of points to make here. I have attempted to provide a vehicle that encourages the use of maneuver. Napoleon analyzed all warfare as a combination of mass and maneuver. Smaller maps covering historical situations virtually remove the element of maneuver from any but a purely tactical context. Maneuver engenders employing your cavalry in its true roles of screening and scouting. Maneuver encourages confronting a position with non-frontal assault. There's a time and place for everything, but, I think that you'll be surprised by the avenues that open up when one is not shoehorned into a short list of options by a map.

Maneuver, in my experience, tends to lower the casualty rates. These still remain too high, though I attribute a lot of that to play style as much as anything. This is the second aspect of gaming that I've tried to address. I've used negative incentives by way of substantially increased victory points for artillery (60) and cavalry (40). Concern over losing those points needlessly should lead to artillery being protected if at all possible; this, I submit, is historically accurate. Similarly, concern over the effects on one's Victory Points should lead to cavalry being employed against cavalry when at all possible, as the points net out unless one side takes a drubbing. Again, I think this is historically accurate in general. If more cautious play is encouraged as a side benefit of these changes, that too would more accurately reflect warfare of the age.

The Orders of Battle

See Appendix C for the sources consulted on Orders of Battle. You will notice, as mentioned above, the presence of two additional corps for the Union, and the additional forces available for the south. I originally intended to run full campaigns with these forces, but, enough is enough eventually, and those lines of the campaign have not been completed. The forces are available for whoever wants to let their imagination run wild.

While the Confederate Order of Battle remains constant throughout the campaign, that of the Army of the Potomac continually evolved during this time period, necessitating no fewer than 7 Orders of Battle to cover the campaign. You may notice a number of Orders of Battle that are not used by any scenario. There are in essence three versions of each of the 7 main Orders of Battle. The one employed in the game has artillery broken down by section, and each cavalry regiment supplied with a 100 man detachment. I call this partial breakdown. The first alternate to this I call no breakdown - batteries are represented as a whole, and there are no cavalry detachments. The second alternative I term full breakdown. These OOB's represent artillery by section, cavalry in 100 man increments, and infantry in 250 man increments. Consistent with my concerns regarding maneuver, the unit size for infantry and cavalry jives well, in my opinion, with distances occupied while marching. Full breakdown is employed in the historical Battle of Brandy Station. I have actually generated scenarios for each of these Orders of Battle, but at the end I've opted to just get a conversion utility out there rather than include 3 versions of each scenario. This utility will be available at a site online.

The strengths arrived at for the various units were calculated by working back from the known strengths at Gettysburg. I added some strength to reflect the effect of march attrition. I added losses incurred during the campaign prior to the Battle of Gettysburg. I cross referenced the numbers I arrived at with the most recent available pre-campaign muster strengths, and made adjustments where necessary. Results were rounded to the nearest 25. I felt this was only honest. The idea that one can set the exact strength of a unit on a given day in a 30 day campaign is, I felt, less than completely honest. I've used the exact numbers for the historical battles.

The Scenarios

I mentioned earlier generating 3 versions of each scenario. Additionally there are usually multiple variations for each scenario. For every scenario with 5 or more variants, at least 5 are provided for use in the campaign. If a scenario has fewer than 5 variants, then all are provided. See Appendix D for a listing of the various scenarios, including which of the variants are supplied for campaign purposes. I hope that the multiple variants on the scenarios will yield a game that can be played and played again without ever playing the same way twice.

The scenarios were created in a modular fashion. A base scenario was constructed, usually consisting of the on map units, or portions of the on map units. A number of "sub scenarios", if you will, were then built. These usually involved reinforcements, and/or varying release times for on map units. I combined these different partial scenarios to come up with the variants for a given scenario. In all nearly 20,000 scenarios and variants were constructed. At one point I had to rein myself in, as I realized that I'd just constructed a scenario with some 2,000 variants. Space considerations did not permit shipping all the variants with the game. I hope to have these available on line at some point in the future.

In addition to the campaign scenarios samples of the 294 main scenarios are available for selection. There are roughly an additional 20 historical scenarios that one may choose from. Scenarios range in length from 4 to over 300 turns. See Appendix E for a listing of scenarios by length.

The Maps

See Appendix B for sources regarding the maps in this game.

Design philosophy:

I consciously began development with a desire to go big in regard to the maps involved. I lobbied John on this matter, and received his blessing and substantial assistance with the tools needed to accomplish this task. While the big maps bring with them problems for some gamers too much maneuver being the biggest complaint, I think the upside outweighs this and similar concerns. Additionally, one can always generate sub-maps and avoid the problem entirely Iíve done so for some of the smaller scenarios, and some stand alone battles.

I also wanted to make the maps aid in restricting certain "gamey" aspects of play. Fields of view were limited/broken up where possible consistent with the terrain. Movement was restricted again where possible consistent with the actual terrain. In short I did what I could to encourage the player not to use his forces as if they were some 19th century version of a panzer division. While other aspects of the game system have a greater effect in this regard than do the maps, I did what I could with them to try and contribute to restricting what I regard as ahistorical play.

It should be noted that I didnít regard this as a "Gettysburg" game. The battle has been done, and done again. This is a game of the Confederate summer offensive of 1863 in the east. From a map making standpoint this means that, while I tried to get the Gettysburg battlefield as true to life as possible, I didnít regard it as any more important than the other areas covered. I approached this entire project with the full knowledge that there are many people who know more about this battle and campaign than I. This holds true for the terrain as much as for any other aspect of the campaign. Iíve done my best in this regard, and of course welcome any constructive criticism.

Techniques:

Topographic and hydrographic data were generated first, working from the USGS 7.5' quadrangles. In most instances I had a high degree of confidence that these features had not changed dramatically in the intervening time. In those relatively rare occasions that I was clued as to major changes in these features, they were modified based on contemporary sources. In entering the topographic features, I over emphasized terrain changes if anything, creating blind spots, and points of observation. By overemphasize I mean that, e.g. a rise which might not warrant depicting as a full hex based on the physical space it occupies was often depicted as a full hex. I do not mean that I added features that were not present. Similarly, I also over emphasized hydrographic features, creating streams even where the USGS data indicated they were of an intermittent nature. I made this decision for two reasons: (1) portraying the hydrography in this fashion helps break up the map - it looks better, and (2) it reflects the effect of stream beds on movement which, in my opinion, exists regardless of the presence of water in the beds.

Rail lines were entered as they currently exist for railroads that were extant at the time of the conflict. I initially felt that it was unlikely that their location had changed to any great degree in the intervening years - an assumption that was largely borne out upon review of the contemporary sources.

I then conducted an examination and cross referencing of the contemporary sources and developed a consensus as to the location and nature of the road net, and entered the data for it. I found that the road net corresponded to a surprising degree with today's roads. While I had anticipated this association for the rail net, the degree of agreement between the road net of the 1860ís and that of today came as somewhat of a shock to me.

A similar technique was employed to identify and enter place names and houses. The Virginia county maps generated by the Confederate engineers were of particular assistance in this regard, as were the pre-war county maps of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The latter were commercially produced by several companies, and were all compiled within a few years immediately prior to the war.

Vegetation was the final item entered, and was the most problematic. Other than for areas in which pitched battles were fought, there was scant information for much of the area covered by the maps. Again, in some instances, I used the maps of the Confederate engineers to fill in this information. Some of the maps from the Official Records and other sources also contained sporadic detail in this regard.

Written descriptions of terrain were consulted, but, for the vast majority of the territory depicted in the maps, there was not enough detail to add to what I could otherwise glean.

Observations:

The degree of agreement between the current road net and that of the 1860ís mentioned earlier was the single most interesting finding of the map construction. The Confederate engineer maps proved invaluable in accurately depicting the road net and place names. In general they proved to be very on target Ė not surprising given the greater familiarity with the territory that one would anticipate the southern engineers having.

The single aspect of current maps which was least helpful is the forestation. In those instances in which I could get access to maps from the 1860ís which depicted forestation there was generally less cover than there is at present. It sounds at first blush counterintuitive, but, upon further reflection, the shift from an agrarian society heated by wood to the current state of affairs supplies ample explanation for this phenomenon.

Problems:

Surprisingly, given that the eastern theater was undoubtedly the most extensively mapped of the war, the map making was hard. This was so in part because there are so many sources. Hereís the problem: few of the sources agree with each other. This holds true for the road net, place names, locations of fords, forestation Ė in short virtually every aspect of the map making. This lack of agreement led to many a false start in rendering what I needed to depict, and, undoubtedly, to mistakes in what is depicted.

While many sources exist, obtaining access to them was a time consuming and, at times, exceedingly frustrating experience. Many of the sources available on line were not scanned at sufficient detail to be usable in any but the broadest of fashions. Others were of sufficient detail, but required considerable work to get in a condition I could use. On the plus side, they are available. Far more are available now, than at the time I started this project - which also happened to be the time I did most of my map work. The increased availability of maps over the past few years has led to my returning to the maps time and again during the course of the development of the game. I can't begin to tell you how often they have been revised.

Most of the maps revolve around a 3 by 3 set of USGS quadrants that became my standard format. I felt this gave sufficient room to allow the maneuver in the games that I wanted to incorporate. This meant dealing with .bmp files of close to 100 Meg in size. 512 Meg of RAM is barely adequate for this task. To do it again, Iíd upgrade to 1 Gig which would speed up the process considerably.

Conclusion

I sincerely hope everyone has as good a time playing this game, as I have had doing the campaign, and scenario design. Please don't hesitate to bring any issues to my attention.

Doug Strickler

Columbia, South Carolina
June, 2004



APPENDIX A
General Sources


A (very) partial listing of sources consulted in the research of this game.

Boatner, Mark M. III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York, 1959

Busey and Martin. Regimental Strengths and Losses at Gettysburg.

Coddington, Edwin B. The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command.

Dyer, Frederick H. A Compendium of the War of Rebellion.

Fishel, Edwin C. The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War.

Fox, William F. Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861 - 1865

Gottfried, Bradley M. Brigades of Gettysburg: The Union and Confederate Brigades at the Battle of Gettysburg. Da Capo Press, 2003.

Johnson & Buell (ed.) Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 3.

Livermore, Thomas L. Numbers and Losses in the Civil War in America, 1861 - 1865.

Longacre, Edward G. The Cavalry at Gettysburg: A Tactical Study of Mounted Operations During the Civil War's Pivotal Campaign, 9 June-14 July 1863. University of Nebraska Press, 1993

Nofi. The Gettysburg Campaign

Pfanz, Harry W. Gettysburg - The First Day, University of North Carolina Press, 2001.

Pfanz, Harry W. Gettysburg, The Second Day, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1987

Pfanz, Harry W. Gettysburg, Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1993

Sifakis, Stewart Compendium of the Confederate Armies.

Scott (ed.) The War of the Rebellion: The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies: Series I, Vol. 27, parts 1 - 3 (serial volumes 43 - 45); to a lesser extent Series I, Volume 25, parts 1 - 2 (serial volumes 39 - 40), and Series I, Volume 29, parts 1 - 2 (serial 48 - 49).

Sears, Stephen W. Gettysburg, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston & New York, 2003



APPENDIX B
Map Sources


Please see the notes.hlp file included with the game for this listing.



APPENDIX C
OOB Sources


A far shorter list than that for the maps. All mentioned before, and I really tried to take from whatever sources I could find. The most important are as follows.

Scott (ed.) The War of the Rebellion: The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies: Series I, Vol. 27, parts 1 - 3 (serial volumes 43 - 45); to a lesser extent Series I, Volume 25, parts 1 - 2 (serial volumes 39 - 40), and Series I, Volume 29, parts 1 - 2 (serial 48 - 49).

Busey and Martin. Regimental Strengths and Losses at Gettysburg.

Dyer, Frederick H. A Compendium of the War of Rebellion.

Fox, William F. Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861 - 1865

Sifakis, Stewart Compendium of the Confederate Armies.



APPENDIX D
Scenario Descriptions


This is very long. I'll just let the scenarios describe themselves. After each campaign scenario description (i.e. not the historical ones) is a listing of the related campaign variants available.

!HISTORICAL 1. The Battle of Gettysburg - July 1 - 3, 1863
THE SOUTH: On July 1st, as the Army of Northern Virginia concentrates north of Gettysburg, elements of 3rd Corps get permission to advance on the town. The advance aims to both to feel out the Union presence detected there on June 30th, and to search for shoes rumored to be stored there - an item sorely needed by the rebel foot soldiers. As the lead elements near the vicinity of Gettysburg they encounter strong resistance from Union cavalry and soon the fight escalates. 2nd Corps is to move to Cashtown and link up with 3rd Corps. While Rodes' division is in transit pursuant to these orders word arrives of the fight brewing at Gettysburg and the division is turned south at Middletown. Early's division, originally ordered to move to Cashtown via Hunterstown and Mummasburg, had, due to the state of that road, already detoured to Heidlersburg, intending to move from there to Mummasburg. It was at Heidlersburg that the word to move south reached the division. Pender's division moves out after Heth's, accompanied by a battalion of the corps reserve artillery. Anderson's division, camped up the road at Fayetteville, moves out early in the morning, but is halted near Cashtown in the early afternoon, awaiting orders. It arrives later in the afternoon. Johnson's division, after a march of some 25 miles along a road crowded with troops of 1st Corps, arrives near Cashtown at 4 p.m. The exhausted troops push on, followed by those of 1st Corps. Pickett's division, which had been left at Chambersburg guarding the army's rear, doesn't arrive till mid-afternoon on July 2nd. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac is concentrated in northern Maryland. Elements of Buford's cavalry division screen to the north of the main body. On June 30th this force makes contact with Confederate infantry. Word goes back to bring up infantry support, setting the stage for a confrontation around the town of Gettysburg. Dawn on July 1st finds the Left Wing of the Union army in position to respond to the call. 1st Corps is camped at Marsh Creek, 3rd Corps at Bridgeport, and 11th Corps at Emmitsburg. 12th Corps, which is not part of the Left Wing, is at Littlestown. Elements of Stannard's brigade, newly transferred to 1st Corps, arrive during the day. Likewise, Lockewood's brigade, scraped together from troops in the east, arrives to bolster 12th Corps. While 1st and 11th Corps move out in a timely fashion, 3rd Corps is inexplicably delayed in moving to Gettysburg. Over the course of the next two days most of the Army of the Potomac concentrates on Gettysburg. Kilpatrick's and Gregg's divisions arrive on July 2nd from their task of screening the Union right and right-rear, and Merritt's brigade arrives on the 3rd after screening the left. 2nd Corps moves from the vicinity of Uniontown, camping near Gettysburg late on the night of July 1st, and arriving on the field in the early morning of the 2nd. 5th Corps, after marching to Hanover, reverses its course and arrives in the area of Gettysburg in the early morning hours of July 2nd. 6th Corps, after initially being ordered to Taneytown, reverses its course and, after a march of some 35 miles arrives near Gettysburg in the mid-afternoon of July 2nd.

!HISTORICAL 1.1 Gettysburg - July 1, 1863
July 1st at Gettysburg. Not as much room for maneuver as in the three day historical battle. The action opens as Buford's vedettes are pushed in by Archer's brigade.

!HISTORICAL 1.1.1 Opening Fight - July 1st - Gettysburg
After pushing Buford's cavalry back to McPherson's Ridge, Heth's division advances to the fray. The lead elements - Archer's and Davis' brigades - run headlong into Wadsworth's division.

!HISTORICAL 1.1.2 Oak Hill - July 1st - Gettysburg
Rodes' division leads the Confederate 2nd Corps' attack on the northern flank of the Union line. This attack strikes elements of the Union 1st and 11th Corps.

!HISTORICAL 1.1.3 Barlow and Early - July 1st - Gettysburg
As the afternoon of July 1st progressed Early's division delivered an attack on the extreme right of the Union line, smashing Barlow's division, units in support of it, and the Union right flank.

!HISTORICAL 1.2 Gettysburg - July 2, 1863
July 2nd at Gettysburg. Not as much room for maneuver as in the three day historical battle. The action opens as Longstreet's offensive begins. No cavalry, as they played no significant role in the events of the day.

!HISTORICAL 1.2.1 Culps Hill - July 2nd - Gettysburg
Johnson attacks in the late evening of July 2nd. Part of the attack falls on a section of the Union line that was as troops were shifted to the left of the Union line in response to Longstreet's attack.

!HISTORICAL 1.2.2 Cemetery Hill - July 2nd - Gettysburg
As night falls on July 2nd elements of Early's division assault Cemetery Hill. After initial success, and without expected support, they ultimately are driven back.

!HISTORICAL 1.2.3 Devil's Den - July 2nd - Gettysburg
The Confederate offensive on July 2nd was conducted en echelon. Hood's division led the assault and ran into trouble right away in an area that became known as Devil's Den.

!HISTORICAL 1.2.4 Little Round Top - July 2nd - Gettysburg
Elements of Laws brigade, the extreme right of Hood's attack, move over Big Round Top and, along with elements of Robertson's brigade, attack Little Round Top.

!HISTORICAL 1.2.5 The Wheatfield - July 2nd - Gettysburg
The en echelon assault of Longstreet's corps works its way to the left. Anderson's brigade of Hood's division, supported by elements of Benning's brigade assault the Wheatfield. McLaws division weighs in with Kershaw's and Semmes' brigades.

!HISTORICAL 1.2a Gettysburg - July 2, 1863, 5 am
July 2nd at Gettysburg. Not as much room for maneuver as in the three day historical battle. Positions as of early morning. No cavalry this day. Buford is sent south for refitting, and the rest of the horse is off skirmishing to the north and east. Stuart's troops are similarly occupied.

!HISTORICAL 1.3 Gettysburg - July 3, 1863, 4 am
July 3rd at Gettysburg. The armies as they were at first light.

!HISTORICAL 1.3.1 Cavalry East - July 3rd - Gettysburg
While the main battle raged near Gettysburg elements of the cavalry for the armies engaged in their own set to east of the town. Stuart tried to turn the Union flank and met with a repulse of his own.

!HISTORICAL 1.3.2 Culps Hill - July 3rd - Gettysburg
Early in the morning of July 3rd the fight for Culp's Hill flares up again. Each side launches attacks to try and claim this vital piece of real estate.

!HISTORICAL 1.3.3 Pickett's charge - July 3rd - Gettysburg
July 3rd at Gettysburg. The armies in position at the start of the cannonade.

!HISTORICAL 1.3.4 Cavalry south - July 3rd - Gettysburg
As Pickett's charge winds down Union cavalry attempts to press the southern flank of the Confederate line.

!HISTORICAL 2. The Battle of Brandy Station - June 9, 1863
THE NORTH: The Union cavalry is deployed to cross at Beverly's Ford and Kelly's Ford and drive on Stevensburg and Brandy Station. A composite brigade of infantry is attached to each wing and will accompany their advance. THE SOUTH: Stuart's division is widely dispersed at the time of the Union attack. Rodes division, camped near Culpeper, responds to a call for help from the rebel horseman, arriving on the field around noon. Full breakdown of all units is used in this scenario.

!HISTORICAL 3. The Battle of Second Winchester - June 13, 1863
THE SOUTH: After moving up the Valley, two divisions of 2nd Corps advance along the Valley Turnpike and the Front Royal Turnpike during the morning of June 13th. Rodes has been detached to deal with a Union force reported to be located at Berryville. In the latter part of the morning advance elements of the army make contact with northern forces under Milroy and the fight is on. Rodes, after moving on Berryville and finding that location not occupied by Union forces, proceeds on to Martinsburg. THE NORTH: The Union forces in the vicinity of Winchester are commanded by General Milroy. Contact with the enemy increases during early June. After an exercise in self delusion of a magnitude seldom encountered, the sobering realization arrives that the reports he has received of rebel forces do not relate to mere raiding parties. When the action heats up on the 13th it is too late to immediately turn and run. By mid morning reports of large bodies of enemy troops can't be ignored. Forces of all arms are sent south to cover the main approaches to Winchester. By mid morning on the 13th Milroy has four of his large guns fired - a prearranged signal to McReynolds in Berryville to retire to Winchester. The brigade manages to take until night time to complete this 10 mile march.

!HISTORICAL 4. The Battle of Aldie - June 17, 1863
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac has shifted north to the vicinity of Manassas. On the 16th orders go out to the Cavalry Corps to aggressively push to the west to both cover a shift of the army in that direction and determine, if possible, the disposition of the rebel army. The morning of the 17th finds the cavalry moving out from Manassas. The goal is to force the pass at Aldie and push west to develop the situation. 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Cavalry Division leads the advance. The infantry forces of the Union army are well to the rear of the cavalry probe and can offer no help. THE SOUTH: The Confederate cavalry moves out on the 15th to screen the transit of 1st and 3rd Corps to the Valley. Fitz Lee's brigade leads the advance followed by Robertson's and W.H.F. Lee's commands. The rest of the horse will follow as the infantry makes its way behind the screen. By the 17th commands of the two Lees reconnoiter toward Aldie and Thoroughfare Gap, while Robertson is centrally located at Rectortown to act as support for the advance forces. By mid afternoon Fitz Lee's command is resting between Middleburg and Aldie while pushing skirmishers forward and W.H.F. Lee's brigade is probing Thoroughfare Gap. The 15th Virginia is cooperating with 3rd Corps in its movement. Hampton's and Jones' brigades screen the upper Rappahannock. None of these units are due to link up with the rest of the cavalry until after 3rd Corps is safely in the Valley - a matter of several days. (historical scenario)

1. The Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863 (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Union cavalry is deployed to cross at Beverly's Ford and Kelly's Ford and drive on Stevensburg and Brandy Station. A composite brigade of infantry is attached to each wing and will accompany their advance. THE SOUTH: Stuart's division is widely dispersed at the time of the Union attack. Rodes division, camped near Culpeper, responds to a call for help from the rebel horseman, arriving on the field around noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 1_18.scn, 1_16.scn, 1_10.scn, 1_20.scn, 1_15.scn, 1_9.SCN, 1_11.SCN, 1_12.SCN, 1_13.SCN, 1_14.SCN, 1_17.SCN, 1_19.SCN, 1_2.SCN, 1_21.SCN, 1_22.SCN, 1_23.SCN, 1_24.SCN, 1_3.SCN, 1_4.SCN, 1_5.SCN, 1_6.SCN, 1_7.SCN, 1_8.SCN, 1_1.SCN

2. Race to the River (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The withdrawal through Pennsylvania proceeds with little harassment from the Union army. By the 11th the advance of the Confederate force arrives at Hagerstown. Two corps move through Fairfield and then Cavetown, while one travels via Cashtown and then south. Imboden's command is covering the pontoon bridge over the Potomac. The rest of the rebel cavalry begins to take serious pressure from northern horse, backed by strong infantry support. By the end of the 11th the makings of a full fledged fight are at hand. THE NORTH: The army cautiously follows the withdrawing Confederate host. When it becomes evident that the force won't overtake the rebel army, two divisions of cavalry supported by one corps of infantry are sent to try and cut the line of retreat of the southern force. This force reaches the west side of South Mountain during the morning of the 11th. The remainder of the army presses directly on the heels of the Confederates. Three corps of the army move through Cashtown and Chambersburg before turning south. The remaining three corps move via Fairfield and Cavetown on the trail of the rebel army. It is early on the 12th before these forces begin to arrive.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 2_5.scn, 2_7.scn, 2_8.scn, 2_6.scn, 2_4.scn

3. The Second Battle of Winchester, June 13, 1863 (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: After moving up the Valley two divisions of 2nd Corps advance along the Front Royal Road during the morning of June 13th. Rodes has been detached to deal with a Union force reported to be located at Berryville. In the latter part of the morning advance elements of the army make contact with northern forces under Milroy and the fight is on. Rodes, after moving on Berryville and finding that location not occupied by Union forces, proceeds on to Martinsburg. THE NORTH: The Union forces in the vicinity of Winchester are commanded by General Milroy. Contact with the enemy increases during early June. After an exercise in self delusion of a magnitude seldom encountered, the sobering realization arrives that the reports he has received of rebel forces do not relate to mere raiding parties. When the action heats up on the 13th it is too late to immediately turn and run. By mid morning reports of large bodies of enemy troops can't be ignored. Forces of all arms are sent south to cover the main approaches to Winchester. Milroy sent word to McReynolds in Berryville on the evening of the 12th to retire to Winchester. The brigade sets out on the 10 mile march early in the day on the 13th and arrives about 10 a.m.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 3_46.scn, 3_21.scn, 3_44.scn, 3_4.scn, 3_18.scn, 3_9.SCN, 3_10.SCN, 3_11.SCN, 3_12.SCN, 3_13.SCN, 3_14.SCN, 3_15.SCN, 3_16.SCN, 3_17.SCN, 3_19.SCN, 3_2.SCN, 3_20.SCN, 3_22.SCN, 3_23.SCN, 3_24.SCN, 3_25.SCN, 3_26.SCN, 3_27.SCN, 3_28.SCN, 3_29.SCN, 3_3.SCN, 3_30.SCN, 3_31.SCN, 3_32.SCN, 3_33.SCN, 3_34.SCN, 3_35.SCN, 3_36.SCN, 3_37.SCN, 3_38.SCN, 3_39.SCN, 3_40.SCN, 3_41.SCN, 3_42.SCN, 3_43.SCN, 3_45.SCN, 3_47.SCN, 3_48.SCN, 3_49.SCN, 3_5.SCN, 3_50.SCN, 3_51.SCN, 3_52.SCN, 3_53.SCN, 3_6.SCN, 3_7.SCN, 3_8.SCN, 3_1.SCN

4. Sharpsburg, June 25, 1863 (var. 21)
THE NORTH: With all the cavalry in the Union army still south of the Potomac, infantry is pressed into service in tracking the rebel army. 11th Corps moves faster than expected, crossing at Edwards Ferry on the 24th and moving to Jefferson. On the 25th it pushes west, crossing South Mountain about noon, seeking signs of the southern forces that all feel have already pushed on into Pennsylvania. In an attempt to cover as broad a front as possible the corps crosses the mountains in three separate places within supporting distance of each other. THE SOUTH: Heth's division and the corps Artillery Reserve, bringing up the rear of 3rd Corps, crosses the Potomac during the morning of June 25th, and then heads north for its intended stop at Hagerstown. Pender's division crossed with Anderson's on the 24th, and by the afternoon of the 25th is well on its way to Greencastle. No report of a fight reaches it as it moves north. 1st Corps has also moved north and will cross the Potomac on the 25th and 26th of June.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 4_13.scn, 4_37.scn, 4_18.scn, 4_23.scn, 4_59.scn

5. Aldie, June 17, 1863 (var. 4)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac has shifted north to the vicinity of Manassas. On the 16th orders go out to the Cavalry Corps to aggressively push to the west to both cover a shift of the army in that direction and determine, if possible, the disposition of the rebel army. The morning of the 17th finds the cavalry moving out from Manassas. The goal is to force the pass at Aldie and push west to develop the situation. 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Cavalry Division leads the advance. The infantry forces of the Union army are well to the rear of the cavalry probe and can offer no help. THE SOUTH: The Confederate cavalry moves out on the 15th to screen the transit of 1st and 3rd Corps to the Valley. Fitz Lee's brigade leads the advance followed by Robertson's and W.H.F. Lee's commands. The rest of the horse will follow as the infantry makes its way behind the screen. By the 17th commands of the two Lees reconnoiter toward Aldie and Thoroughfare Gap, while Robertson is centrally located at Rectortown to act as support for the advance forces. By mid afternoon Fitz Lee's unit is resting between Middleburg and Aldie while pushing skirmishers forward and W.H.F. Lee is probing Thoroughfare Gap. The 15th Virginia is cooperating with 3rd Corps in its movement. Hampton's and Jones' brigades screen the upper Rappahannock. None of these units are due to link up with the rest of the cavalry until after 3rd Corps is safely in the Valley - a matter of several days. (historical scenario)

Campaign Scenarios provided: 5_76.scn, 5_72.scn, 5_62.scn, 5_11.scn, 5_6.scn, 5_9.SCN, 5_10.SCN, 5_12.SCN, 5_13.SCN, 5_14.SCN, 5_15.SCN, 5_16.SCN, 5_17.SCN, 5_18.SCN, 5_19.SCN, 5_2.SCN, 5_20.SCN, 5_21.SCN, 5_22.SCN, 5_23.SCN, 5_24.SCN, 5_25.SCN, 5_26.SCN, 5_27.SCN, 5_28.SCN, 5_29.SCN, 5_3.SCN, 5_30.SCN, 5_31.SCN, 5_32.SCN, 5_33.SCN, 5_34.SCN, 5_35.SCN, 5_36.SCN, 5_37.SCN, 5_38.SCN, 5_39.SCN, 5_4.SCN, 5_40.SCN, 5_41.SCN, 5_42.SCN, 5_43.SCN, 5_44.SCN, 5_45.SCN, 5_46.SCN, 5_47.SCN, 5_48.SCN, 5_49.SCN, 5_5.SCN, 5_50.SCN, 5_51.SCN, 5_52.SCN, 5_53.SCN, 5_54.SCN, 5_55.SCN, 5_56.SCN, 5_57.SCN, 5_58.SCN, 5_59.SCN, 5_60.SCN, 5_61.SCN, 5_63.SCN, 5_64.SCN, 5_65.SCN, 5_66.SCN, 5_67.SCN, 5_68.SCN, 5_69.SCN, 5_7.SCN, 5_70.SCN, 5_71.SCN, 5_73.SCN, 5_74.SCN, 5_75.SCN, 5_77.SCN, 5_78.SCN, 5_79.SCN, 5_8.SCN, 5_80.SCN, 5_1.SCN

6. The Raid, June 29, 1863 (var. 13)
THE SOUTH: Stuart's Cavalry Division, after circling behind the Army of the Potomac, works its way north attempting to reestablish contact with the main body of the Army of Northern Virginia. Supply trains have been intercepted, rail lines cut, and in general havoc created in the Union rear, but the eyes of the army need to find the body. About 5 p.m. on June 29th the rebel horse begins approaching Westminster, Maryland. The command is travelling along three parallel roads from Germantown, Sikesville, and Baltimore. Union cavalry is in the area. Reestablishing contact with the main body becomes less of a concern than self preservation at that point. THE NORTH: On June 29th the Union army is shifting north. 1st and 11th Corps are moving from Frederick to Emmitsburg, 2nd Corps from Monacacy Junction to Uniontown, 3rd and 12th Corps are on the road to Taneytown, 5th and 6th Corps bring up the rear. Buford's cavalry division is screening to the west, searching for signs of the rebel army. Word has come the Stuart is running loose in the rear of the army spreading confusion and distraction as he goes. Gregg's Division, the easternmost of the cavalry in the army, covers the right flank of the army, sparring during the day with rebel horse as it moves north to New Windsor. Much time is consumed in trying to hunt down the southern troopers, so the division arrives on the field later in the afternoon hours. The Cavalry Corps has just been beefed up with the transfer of Stahel's division from the Washington defenses. This new element of the Cavalry Corps, now under the leadership of Judson Kilpatrick moves out from Frederick, Maryland with the main body of the army and is assigned the task of moving to the front of the forces and screening the advance from Littlestown north. The mass of units moving from the Fredericksburg area interferes with this movement and the division finds itself delayed and at the rear of a huge column of troops.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 6_5.scn, 6_12.scn, 6_3.scn, 6_4.scn, 6_8.scn

7. The Battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: On July 1st, as the Army of Northern Virginia concentrates north of Gettysburg, elements of 3rd Corps get permission to advance on the town. The advance aims to both to feel out the Union presence detected there on June 30th, and to search for shoes rumored to be stored there - an item sorely needed by the rebel foot soldiers. As the lead elements near the vicinity of Gettysburg they encounter strong resistance from Union cavalry and soon the fight escalates. 2nd Corps is to move to Cashtown and link up with 3rd Corps. While Rodes' division is in transit pursuant to these orders word arrives of the fight brewing at Gettysburg and the division is turned south at Middletown. Early's division, originally ordered to move to Cashtown via Hunterstown and Mummasburg, had, due to the state of that road, already detoured to Heidlersburg, intending to move from there to Mummasburg. It was at Heidlersburg that the word to move south reached the division. Pender's division moves out after Heth's, accompanied by a battalion of the corps reserve artillery. Anderson's division, camped up the road at Fayetteville, moves out early in the morning, but is halted near Cashtown in the early afternoon, awaiting orders. It arrives later in the afternoon. Johnson's division, after a march of some 25 miles along a road crowded with troops of 1st Corps, arrives near Cashtown at 4 p.m. The exhausted troops push on, followed by those of 1st Corps. Pickett's division, which had been left at Chambersburg guarding the army's rear, doesn't arrive till mid-afternoon on July 2nd. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac is concentrated in northern Maryland. Elements of Buford's cavalry division screen to the north of the main body. On June 30th this force makes contact with Confederate infantry. Word goes back to bring up infantry support, setting the stage for a confrontation around the town of Gettysburg. Dawn on July 1st finds the Left Wing of the Union army in position to respond to the call. 1st Corps is camped at Marsh Creek, 3rd Corps at Bridgeport, and 11th Corps at Emmitsburg. 12th Corps, which is not part of the Left Wing, is at Littlestown. Elements of Stannard's brigade, newly transferred to 1st Corps, arrive during the day. Likewise, Lockewood's brigade, scraped together from troops in the east, arrives to bolster 12th Corps. While 1st and 11th Corps move out in a timely fashion, 3rd Corps is inexplicably delayed in moving to Gettysburg. Over the course of the next two days most of the Army of the Potomac concentrates on Gettysburg. Kilpatrick's and Gregg's divisions arrive on July 2nd from their task of screening the Union right and right-rear, and Merritt's brigade arrives on the 3rd after screening the left. 2nd Corps moves from the vicinity of Uniontown, camping near Gettysburg late on the night of July 1st, and arriving on the field in the early morning of the 2nd. 5th Corps, after marching to Hanover, reverses its course and arrives in the area of Gettysburg in the early morning hours of July 2nd. 6th Corps, after initially being ordered to Taneytown, reverses its course and, after a march of some 35 miles arrives near Gettysburg in the mid-afternoon of July 2nd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 7_4.scn, 7_21.scn, 7_46.scn, 7_47.scn, 7_58.scn, 7_9.SCN, 7_10.SCN, 7_11.SCN, 7_12.SCN, 7_13.SCN, 7_14.SCN, 7_15.SCN, 7_16.SCN, 7_17.SCN, 7_18.SCN, 7_19.SCN, 7_2.SCN, 7_20.SCN, 7_22.SCN, 7_23.SCN, 7_24.SCN, 7_25.SCN, 7_26.SCN, 7_27.SCN, 7_28.SCN, 7_29.SCN, 7_3.SCN, 7_30.SCN, 7_31.SCN, 7_32.SCN, 7_33.SCN, 7_34.SCN, 7_35.SCN, 7_36.SCN, 7_37.SCN, 7_38.SCN, 7_39.SCN, 7_40.SCN, 7_41.SCN, 7_42.SCN, 7_43.SCN, 7_44.SCN, 7_45.SCN, 7_48.SCN, 7_49.SCN, 7_5.SCN, 7_50.SCN, 7_51.SCN, 7_52.SCN, 7_53.SCN, 7_54.SCN, 7_55.SCN, 7_56.SCN, 7_57.SCN, 7_59.SCN, 7_6.SCN, 7_60.SCN, 7_7.SCN, 7_8.SCN, 7_1.SCN

8. Falling Waters, July 12, 1863 (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac moves cautiously, but purposefully south along the eastern slopes of the mountains. While the rebel army has been defeated, it is still a force to be reckoned with. Cavalry probes were repulsed by the rebel horse and the arrival of the main body of their army, but by July 12th the Union army is on the scene assembled and in position to attempt to destroy the rebel army north of the Potomac river. THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia retreats to Hagerstown, with the main body of the army arriving July 6 - July 7. Heated cavalry clashes as the army was in the process of arriving drove off marauding Union horse. The Potomac itself is not cooperating as it is well above the fordable stage. The army delays near Funkstown and then Hagerstown as a crossing is improvised, finally falling back to the west of Hagerstown on the 10th. The crossing is being planned for the night of the 13th. By the morning of the 12th, with no real attack by the northern main body, escape seems possible. The army is well entrenched and aching for a chance to stand on the defensive while the Army of the Potomac has to cross some open fields into their sights.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 8_1.scn

9. Pipe Creek Assault - Right (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The advance is made through Taneytown with the aim of forcing the Union army off the Pipe Creek line and away from Frederick, Maryland, thereby opening things up for an advance on Washington from the west. Cavalry with infantry support screens the right flank. In the early afternoon of the 5th the lead elements of the army encounter increased resistance from Union forces of all arms. The Army of Northern Virginia begins to deploy from march order to meet force with force. THE NORTH: The army grudgingly withdraws south on the 4th, covered by a strong rear guard composed of the Cavalry Corps and almost half the army's infantry. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. By early on the afternoon of the 5th the main body has taken up position along Big Pipe Creek. The covering forces are preparing to move from their last defensive positions to join this line when the level of pressure from southern forces increases dramatically.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 9_1.scn

10. Scrap east of the mountains (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: Stuart's warnings of the Union presence north of the Potomac spur the Confederate command to order the army to hasten west of the mountains and then south. 3rd Corps is ordered to the east of the mountains to screen the passage of elements of 2nd Corps to the west along the Chambersburg Pike. By mid morning of the 30th the horse is nearing Gettysburg just as the lead elements of 3rd Corps also approach that town. Robertson's and Jones' brigades, detailed to screen the routes to the Valley, move out on the 27th when the Union presence abates. They make a rapid march north and arrive in time to screen the south flank of the movement west. 2nd Corps responds to the directive to cross the mountains with amazing speed. Even Jenkins' cavalry moves with a purpose, appearing in the vicinity at 2 p.m. with Rodes' division right behind it. Early's division takes the York Pike and will make Gettysburg by late afternoon. THE NORTH: On June 30th Buford's cavalry division moves south from Fairfield, through Emmitsburg, and then north towards Gettysburg, patrolling the left flank of the army. Enemy horse is encountered near Gettysburg, backed by masses of infantry. The call goes out for support from the Union foot and a fight brews. It takes some time for the Union cavalry to sort things out after the confusion on the 29th. But, by mid morning on the 30th, Kilpatrick's division has picked up the axis of the Confederate cavalry's advance and is passing through Littlestown, moving up the pike toward Gettysburg. The army command hesitates on the issue of bringing the most remote reserves forward. By the time a decision is made and 2nd Corps moves out it is evening on the 30th. 5th Corps is similarly delayed and camps at Westminster, heading out from there at daybreak. 6th Corps misunderstands its orders and marches to Hanover before turning west. 12th Corps is under orders to march from Taneytown to Littlestown, but, is ordered to move towards Gettysburg from that location and proceeds up the Westminster Pike. 1st Corps gets word of the situation near Gettysburg around noon and the left wing of the army is ordered to move north. 1st Corps moves out rapidly, with 11th following closely behind. 3rd Corps, en route from Taneytown to Emmitsburg, also presses its move north. Gregg's cavalry division is detailed to cover the Union right rear and moves up along the Westminster Pike on the morning of the 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 10_31.scn, 10_28.scn, 10_14.scn, 10_24.scn, 10_4.scn

11. July 8th, Counterstroke (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: By July 7th the Confederate cavalry has driven back the Union horse from the Williamsport area, and the rest of the army is arriving in Hagerstown. The events in Pennsylvania have not been positive, but the rebel army is far from beaten. The plan is to attack Union forces as they arrive, bottling them up as they cross South Mountain, and hopefully, defeat them in detail. To start things rolling the Union cavalry has fallen back to the Boonesborough area, and doesn't appear to have any infantry support. By early morning of the 8th two corps of the Army of Northern Virginia have moved south, while one covers the Hagerstown area, which is beginning to feel pressure from a combined arms force near Waynesborough. THE NORTH: By July 8th the Union cavalry has fallen back from the area around Williamsport to Boonesboro, covering the passes over South Mountain that the army will use. The Confederate army arrived on the scene on the 6th and 7th and the situation now develops into a full fledged fight. Neill and MacIntosh who have been trailing the retreating rebel army, arrive on the morning of the 8th, advancing from Waynesborough. As the pressure builds on the screening forces, the north is forced to commit troops in an ad hoc fashion, or risk losing a chance to bag the whole Confederate army. 11th Corps advances first - moving to Turner's Gap with Schurz's division advancing to Boonesboro at 1 p.m. on the 8th. The rest of the corps follows the morning of the 9th at the van of a rush of reinforcements crossing South Mountain. The battle joins in earnest.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 11_2.scn, 11_5.scn, 11_4.scn, 11_7.scn, 11_1.scn

12. July 7th, Rapid Pursuit (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The army is in hot pursuit of the Army of Northern Virginia. Two divisions of cavalry are driven off by rebel forces on the 6th, but by July 7th infantry is arriving. The push to isolate and destroy the rebel force is under way. Strung out and exhausted from forced marches, the Union troops make their way to the field, and seek to deliver a quick knock out punch to the Confederate army. THE SOUTH: Reeling from the blow in Pennsylvania the southern army no sooner drives off the northern horse loose in its rear than it finds itself dealing with a most aggressive pursuit. 2nd and 3rd Corps have only arrived themselves when Union infantry begins to appear.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 12_1.scn

13. Stand on Pipe Creek (var. 65)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pursues the retreating Army of the Potomac. One corps moves along the pike to Westminster, a second along the Taneytown Road, and the third along the Emmitsburg Pike. Cavalry both leads the pursuit and screens the flanks of the main body of the army. The forces take no time to rest and reorder. The lead infantry elements encounter the Union rear guard in the afternoon of July 4th. THE NORTH: On the evening of July 3rd the Army of the Potomac begins a retreat from Pennsylvania. By the 4th the Union army is in a headlong rout. They rush south seeking the safety of the Pipe Creek line. There is only a nod in the direction of a rear guard action.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 13_60.scn, 13_58.scn, 13_65.scn, 13_43.scn, 13_33.scn

14. North of Westminster (var. 60)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pursues the retreating Army of the Potomac. One corps moves along the pike to Westminster, a second along the Taneytown Road, and the third along the Emmitsburg Pike. Cavalry both leads the pursuit and screens the flanks of the main body of the army. The forces take no time to rest and reorder. The lead infantry elements encounter the Union rear guard in the afternoon of July 4th. THE NORTH: On the evening of July 3rd the Army of the Potomac begins a retreat from Pennsylvania. By the 4th the Union army is in headlong retreat. They rush south seeking the safety of the Pipe Creek line. There is only a nod in the direction of a rear guard action.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 14_37.scn, 14_6.scn, 14_25.scn, 14_24.scn, 14_47.scn

15. Push the Pursuit (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pursues the retreating Army of the Potomac. Two corps south from Gettysburg on the Taneytown Road, while the third moves along the pike to Westminster. Cavalry both leads the pursuit and screens the flanks of the main body of the army. The forces take no time to rest and reorder. The lead infantry elements encounter the Union rear guard in the afternoon of July 4th. THE NORTH: On the evening of July 3rd the Army of the Potomac begins a retreat The plan is for a deliberate, fighting withdrawal with a strong in the afternoon on the 4th one corps is covering each of the major lines of withdrawal as the rest of the army heads for the defensive terrain along Pipe Creek.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 15_20.scn, 15_24.scn, 15_12.scn, 15_48.scn, 15_70.scn

16. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Attack Across the Front (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The advance is across a broad front. Late on the 5th advance elements begin to feel out the Union forces as the main body of the Confederate army gathers behind its screen. THE NORTH: The army streams south on the 4th employing only a weak rear guard. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. On the 5th the cavalry screens the deployment of the army along Big Pipe Creek, then peels off to protect the flanks of the defensive position. One corps is deployed on the left as a reserve. In the late afternoon Confederate cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins to bring significant pressure on the Army of the Potomac.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 16_1.scn, 16_2.scn, 16_3.scn

17. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Crush the Center (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The main advance will be on Westminster in the hope crushing the center of any Union defensive line. Most of the army will have to use one road which is a drawback, but the amount of force which will be concentrated on the center any defensive line along Pipe Creek should offset this disadvantage. Late on the 5th advance elements begin to feel out the Union forces as the main body of the Confederate army gathers behind its screen. THE NORTH: The army streams south on the 4th employing only a weak rear guard. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. On the 5th the cavalry screens the deployment of the army along Big Pipe Creek, then peels off to protect the flanks of the defensive position. One corps is deployed on the left as a reserve. In the late afternoon Confederate cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins to bring significant pressure on the Army of the Potomac.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 17_1.scn, 17_2.scn, 17_3.scn

18. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Assault the Left (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The advance is made through Taneytown with the aim of forcing the Union army off the Pipe Creek line and away from Frederick, Maryland, thereby opening things up for an advance on Washington from the west. Cavalry with infantry support screens the right flank. Late on the 5th advance elements begin to feel out the Union forces as the main body of the Confederate army gathers behind its screen. THE NORTH: The army streams south on the 4th employing only a weak rear guard. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. On the 5th the cavalry screens the deployment of the army along Big Pipe Creek, then peels off to protect the flanks of the defensive position. One corps is deployed in the center as a reserve. In the late afternoon Confederate cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins to bring significant pressure on the Army of the Potomac.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 18_1.scn, 18_2.scn, 18_3.scn

19. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Assault the Right (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The axis of the advance is through Manchester. This advance, if successful, will turn any defensive line along Pipe Creek while at the same time breaching the likely fall back position along Parr Ridge. The Union would be forced out of the best defensive positions for both Washington and Baltimore in one fell swoop. Late on the 5th advance elements begin to feel out the Union forces as the main body of the Confederate army gathers behind its screen. THE NORTH: The army streams south on the 4th employing only a weak rear guard. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. On the 5th the cavalry screens the deployment of the army along Big Pipe Creek, then peels off to protect the flanks of the defensive position. One corps is deployed on the left as a reserve. In the late afternoon Confederate cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins to bring significant pressure on the Army of the Potomac.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 19_1.scn, 19_2.scn, 19_3.scn

20. Pipe Creek Assault - Balanced (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The advance is across a broad front. In the early afternoon of the 5th the lead elements of the army encounter increased resistance from Union forces of all arms. The Army of Northern Virginia begins to deploy from march order to meet force with force. THE NORTH: The army grudgingly withdraws south on the 4th, covered by a strong rear guard composed of the Cavalry Corps and almost half the army's infantry. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. By early on the afternoon of the 5th the main body has taken up position along Big Pipe Creek. The covering forces are preparing to move from their last defensive positions to join this line when the level of pressure from southern forces increases dramatically.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 20_1.scn

21. Pipe Creek Assault - Left (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The axis of the advance is through Manchester. This advance, if successful, will turn any defensive line along Pipe Creek while at the same time breaching the likely fall back position along Parr Ridge. The Union would be forced out of the best defensive positions for both Washington and Baltimore in one fell swoop. In the early afternoon of the 5th the lead elements of the army encounter increased resistance from Union forces of all arms. The Army of Northern Virginia begins to deploy from march order to meet force with force. THE NORTH: The army grudgingly withdraws south on the 4th, covered by a strong rear guard composed of the Cavalry Corps and almost half the army's infantry. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. By early on the afternoon of the 5th the main body has taken up position along Big Pipe Creek. The covering forces are preparing to move from their last defensive positions to join this line when the level of pressure from southern forces increases dramatically.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 21_1.scn

22. Crush the Rear Guard (var. 3)
THE NORTH: Upon realizing that the Army of Northern Virginia has turned south rather than continuing the invasion, the Army of the Potomac moves to protect the southern approaches to Washington while dispatching a strong force to trail and harass the rebel army. Three corps of the army, augmented by recent reinforcements, along with a division of the Cavalry Corps are assigned this task. On July 10th this force of all arms crosses South Mountain and has a chance to crush the Confederate rear guard north of the Potomac. A victory here may salvage something from the campaign. THE SOUTH: The move south from Pennsylvania is smooth and leisurely. Upon reaching the Hagerstown area a problem crops up - the Potomac River. It is swollen by recent rains and running near flood stage. The pontoon bridge which had been constructed needs repair. The army is unable to begin crossing until the 9th of July. By the 10th all that remains north of the river is the rear guard consisting of 3rd Corps and a couple of brigades of cavalry. The northern army has moved faster than anyone expected and begins pressuring this force early on the 10th. The rear guard will need to hold the northern shore until it can withdraw under the cover of night. One more bloody nose to the Union won't hurt the campaign record of the army either.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 22_1.scn, 22_2.scn, 22_3.scn

23. Pipe Creek Assault - Center (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia pauses to reorganize prior to following the retreat of the Union army, spending much of July 4th in this process. When it moves south it does so in an organized, tightly controlled fashion. The main advance will be on Westminster in the hope crushing the center of any Union defensive line. Most of the army will have to use one road which is a drawback, but the amount of force which will be concentrated on the center of any defensive line along Pipe Creek should offset this disadvantage. In the early afternoon of the 5th the lead elements of the army encounter increased resistance from Union forces of all arms. The Army of Northern Virginia begins to deploy from march order to meet force with force. THE NORTH: The army grudgingly withdraws south on the 4th, covered by a strong rear guard composed of the Cavalry Corps and almost half the army's infantry. The pursuit by the rebel host is surprisingly restrained. By early on the afternoon of the 5th the main body has taken up position along Big Pipe Creek. The covering forces are preparing to move from their last defensive positions to join this line when the level of pressure from southern forces increases dramatically.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 23_1.scn

24. On to Virginia II (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The withdrawal through Pennsylvania proceeds with little harassment from the Union army. By the 11th the advance of the Confederate force arrives at Hagerstown. Two corps move through Fairfield and then Cavetown, while one travels via Cashtown and then south. Imboden's command is covering the pontoon bridge over the Potomac. The rest of the rebel cavalry begins to take serious pressure from northern horse, backed by strong infantry support. By the end of the 11th the makings of a full fledged fight are at hand. THE NORTH: The army cautiously follows the withdrawing Confederate host. When it becomes evident that the force won't overtake the rebel army, two divisions of cavalry supported by three corps of infantry are sent to try and cut the line of retreat of the southern force. This force reaches the west side of South Mountain during the morning of the 11th. The remainder of the army presses directly on the heels of the Confederates. Two corps of the army move through Cashtown and Chambersburg before turning south. The remaining two corps move via Fairfield and Cavetown on the trail of the rebel army. It is early on the 12th before these forces begin to arrive.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 24_6.scn, 24_3.scn, 24_8.scn, 24_1.scn, 24_4.scn

25. On to Virginia I (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: The withdrawal through Pennsylvania proceeds with little harassment from the Union army. By the 11th the advance of the Confederate force is arriving at Hagerstown. Two corps move through Cashtown and then south, while one travels via Fairfield and then though Cavetown. Imboden's command is covering the pontoon bridge over the Potomac. The rest of the rebel cavalry begins to take serious pressure from northern horse, backed by strong infantry support. By the end of the 11th the makings of a full fledged fight are at hand. THE NORTH: The army boldly moves to cut the Confederate line of retreat. Six corps and two cavalry divisions head west to cross the mountains and accomplish this objective while one corps and one division of cavalry trail the rebel army. The main body reaches the west side of South Mountain during the morning of the 11th and immediately encounters southern forces. The remainder of the army presses directly on the heels of the Confederates. Random arrival - low chances.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 25_6.scn, 25_8.scn, 25_2.scn, 25_5.scn, 25_7.scn

26. Storm the rear guard (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The army is defeated in northern Maryland and must retreat. With the loss morale took a serious hit, and it's a shaken army that moves north seeking crossing points over the mountains to the west. The move begins at night. Much of the army's cavalry is sent west to cover the passes over South Mountain and screen the Potomac River crossings. By mid morning the army is moving through Gettysburg and Fairfield with one corps moving via Fairfield and two along the Chambersburg Pike. The unexpected approach of the Union army necessitates that the army deploy and fight for its life. There is a moderately low likelihood of high fatigue in the Confederate units. THE NORTH: After besting the southern army in Maryland the Army of the Potomac starts an aggressive pursuit of the retreating rebel force. Forces gathered in from around the east help the army recover some of its losses over the past weeks. Most of the cavalry and one corps of infantry move cautiously toward the South Mountain passes to apply pressure on any crossing of the Potomac while the rest of the army moves out at first light on the trail of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. Amazingly, with the opportunity at hand to strike the rebel forces a telling blow, staff errors result in five of the available corps taking the pike from Westminster. The resulting traffic snarl slows the advance immensely. Only one corps advances via Emmitsburg. By mid morning of the 9th the avant garde begins to develop the Confederate position near Gettysburg. Here is a chance to finish the work started in Maryland and crush the rebel army completely.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 26_39.scn, 26_26.scn, 26_2.scn, 26_24.scn, 26_23.scn

27. Cover the Crossing (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The withdrawal through Pennsylvania proceeds with little harassment from the Union army. By the 11th the advance of the Confederate force arrives at Hagerstown. Two corps move through Fairfield and then Cavetown, while one travels via Cashtown and then south. Imboden's command is covering the pontoon bridge over the Potomac. The rest of the rebel cavalry begins to take serious pressure from northern horse, backed by strong infantry support. By the end of the 11th the makings of a full fledged fight are at hand. THE NORTH: The army cautiously follows the withdrawing Confederate host. When it becomes evident that the force won't overtake the rebel army, two divisions of cavalry supported by two corps of infantry are sent to try and cut the line of retreat of the southern force. This force reaches the west side of South Mountain during the morning of the 11th. The remainder of the army presses directly on the heels of the Confederates. Three corps of the army move through Cashtown and Chambersburg before turning south. The remaining two corps move via Fairfield and Cavetown on the trail of the rebel army. It is early on the 12th before these forces begin to arrive.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 27_3.scn, 27_8.scn, 27_1.scn, 27_2.scn, 27_6.scn

28. Stand in Pennsylvania (var. 7)
THE NORTH: After besting the southern army in Maryland the Army of the Potomac takes a day to sort itself out, and then moves in pursuit of the rebel force. The addition of forces gathered in from around the east help the army recover some of its losses over the past weeks. Most of the cavalry and one corps of infantry move cautiously toward the South Mountain passes to apply pressure on any crossing of the Potomac while the rest of the army follows the trail of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. Amazingly, with the opportunity at hand to strike the rebel forces a telling blow, staff errors result in five of the available corps advancing via Emmitsburg. The resulting traffic snarl slows the advance immensely. Only one corps advances along the pike from Westminster. By the afternoon of the 9th the avant garde begins to develop the Confederate position near Gettysburg. Here is a chance to finish the work started in Maryland and crush the rebel army completely. THE SOUTH: The army grudgingly withdraws from northern Maryland. Most of the southern horse screens the passes over South Mountain against the possibility of a Union move in that direction. In order both to gain time for the long trains to move south, and to try and lure the north into a costly fight, the main body of the army forms a line of battle near Gettysburg. Two corps cover the route west to Chambersburg, while one covers that through Fairfield. The better part of a day passes with little bother from northern troops. The time is spent digging in. Late in the afternoon of July 9th Union cavalry begins to make its presence felt. If the north can't break the line for a couple of days the army will fall back via Chambersburg and Fairfield.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 28_1.scn, 28_3.scn, 28_2.scn, 28_5.scn, 28_4.scn

29. Delay near Gettysburg (var. 3)
THE NORTH: After besting the southern army in Maryland the Army of the Potomac takes a day to sort itself out, and then moves in pursuit of the rebel force. The addition of forces gathered in from around the east help the army recover some of its losses over the past weeks. Most of the cavalry and two corps of infantry move cautiously toward the South Mountain passes to apply pressure on any crossing of the Potomac while the rest of the army follows the trail of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. Three corps move via Emmitsburg, while two take the pike from Westminster. By the afternoon of the 9th the avant garde begins to develop the Confederate position near Gettysburg. Here is a chance to finish the work started in Maryland and crush the rebel army completely. THE SOUTH: The army grudgingly withdraws from northern Maryland. Most of the southern horse screens the passes over South Mountain against the possibility of a Union move in that direction. In order both to gain time for the long trains to move south, and to try and lure the north into a costly fight, the main body of the army forms a line of battle near Gettysburg. Two corps cover the route west to Chambersburg, while one covers that through Fairfield. The better part of a day passes with little bother from northern troops. The time is spent digging in. Late in the afternoon of July 9th Union cavalry begins to make its presence felt. If the north can't break the line for a couple of days the army will fall back via Chambersburg and Fairfield.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 29_5.scn, 29_8.scn, 29_4.scn, 29_2.scn, 29_6.scn

30. Halt the Pursuit (var. 2)
THE NORTH: After besting the southern army in Maryland the Army of the Potomac takes a day to sort itself out, and then moves in pursuit of the rebel force. The addition of forces gathered in from around the east help the army recover some of its losses over the past weeks. Most of the cavalry and three corps of infantry move cautiously toward the South Mountain passes to apply pressure on any crossing of the Potomac while the rest of the army follows the trail of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. The army advances in a balanced fashion with two corps moving via Emmitsburg and two up the pike from Westminster. By the afternoon of the 9th the avant garde begins to develop the Confederate position near Gettysburg. Here is a chance to finish the work started in Maryland and crush the rebel army completely. THE SOUTH: The army grudgingly withdraws from northern Maryland. Most of the southern horse screens the passes over South Mountain against the possibility of a Union move in that direction. In order both to gain time for the long trains to move south, and to try and lure the north into a costly fight, the main body of the army forms a line of battle near Gettysburg. One corps covers the route west to Chambersburg, while two cover that through Fairfield. The better part of a day passes with little bother from northern troops. The time is spent digging in. Late in the afternoon of July 9th Union cavalry begins to make its presence felt. If the north can't break the line for a couple of days the army will fall back via Chambersburg and Fairfield.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 30_5.scn, 30_1.scn, 30_6.scn, 30_4.scn, 30_3.scn

31. Falling Waters, July 13, 1863 (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac moves cautiously, but purposefully south along the eastern slopes of the mountains. Cavalry attempts to cut off the rebel army but is driven away by Confederate horse. The army assembles gradually along Antietam Creek, and, once assembled advances cautiously on the southern host. By the 13th the Potomac is receding and time is getting short to deal with the rebel army while it is still on northern soil with its back to a river. THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia retreats to Hagerstown, with the main body of the army arriving July 6 - July 7. Heated cavalry clashes as the army was in the process of arriving drove off marauding Union horse. The Potomac itself is not cooperating as it is well above the fordable stage. The army delays near Funkstown and then Hagerstown as a crossing is improvised, finally falling back to the west of Hagerstown on the 10th. The crossing is being planned for the night of the 13th. The 13th dawns and still no attack has come. Perhaps the army has gotten lucky. The southern force is well entrenched and any attack will have to be very strong to keep the withdrawal to Virginia from taking place.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 31_1.scn

32. The long road south (var. 42)
THE SOUTH: The army is defeated in northern Maryland and must retreat. With the loss morale took a serious hit, and it's a shaken army that moves north seeking crossing points over the mountains to the west. The move begins at night. Much of the army's cavalry is sent west to cover the passes over South Mountain and screen the Potomac River crossings. By mid morning the army is moving through Gettysburg and Fairfield with one corps moving via Fairfield and two along the Chambersburg Pike. The unexpected approach of the Union army necessitates that the army deploy and fight for its life. There is a high likelihood that units will have high fatigue. THE NORTH: After besting the southern army in Maryland the Army of the Potomac starts an aggressive pursuit of the retreating rebel force. Forces gathered in from around the east help the army recover some of its losses over the past weeks. Most of the cavalry and one corps of infantry move cautiously toward the South Mountain passes to apply pressure on any crossing of the Potomac while the rest of the army moves out at first light on the trail of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. The advance will be by four corps through Emmitsburg while two travel north on the pike from Westminster. The resulting traffic snarl slows the advance immensely. Only one corps advances along the pike from Westminster. By mid morning of the 9th the avant garde begins to develop the Confederate position near Gettysburg. Here is a chance to finish the work started in Maryland and crush the rebel army completely.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 32_49.scn, 32_1.scn, 32_32.scn, 32_6.scn, 32_14.scn

33. Falling Waters, July 11, 1863 (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac moves cautiously, but purposefully south along the eastern slopes of the mountains. The magnitude of the defeat of the rebel army emboldens the Union command to try for a knock out blow before the rebel forces can cross into Virginia. The cavalry probes were repulsed by the rebel horse and the arrival of the main body of their army, but by July 11th the Union army is on the scene and ready to attempt to crush the Confederate force. THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia retreats to Hagerstown, with the main body of the army arriving July 6 - July 7. Heated cavalry clashes as the army was in the process of arriving drove off marauding Union horse. The Potomac itself is not cooperating as it is well above the fordable stage. The army delays near Funkstown and then Hagerstown as a crossing is improvised, finally falling back to the west of Hagerstown on the 10th. The crossing is being planned for the night of the 13th. Field entrenchments are made, guns are dug in, and by the 11th the army awaits the chance to let the Union forces attempt to breach the line.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 33_1.scn

34. Entrenched along Pipe Creek I (var. 12)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia concentrates in the Gettysburg area, then, screened by its cavalry, moves south on July 3rd. The advance is by the left flank. The axis of advance will be through Manchester and then on to Westminster. The hope is to break the Union line at what is expected to be its weakest point, and flank the strong defensive terrain of Parr's Ridge. While confidence is high, a tough fight is expected, as all intelligence indicates the northern army is massed along Big Pipe Creek and it has had plenty of time to organize its position. By mid morning on the 4th the army approaches the Union line and the fight is on. THE NORTH: The army deploys and has plenty of time to dig in along Big Pipe Creek. The front is very long, but features good defensive terrain supplemented by extensive field works. One corps is deployed on the left as a reserve. Early on July 4th pickets report masses of infantry and cavalry approaching. The fight is joined.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 34_11.scn, 34_7.scn, 34_9.scn, 34_10.scn, 34_3.scn

35. An avalanche heads south (var. 88)
THE SOUTH: Stuart's warnings of the Union presence north of the Potomac spur the Confederate command to order the army south, employing the superb road net through Gettysburg to facilitate this move. The cavalry also has enough information to guess at the real location of the main body of the army. By mid morning of the 30th the horse is nearing Gettysburg just as the lead elements of the army's infantry also approach that town. Robertson's and Jones' brigades, detailed to screen the routes to the Valley, move out on the 27th when the Union presence abates. They screen the right of the infantry, moving through Fairfield after a rapid march north. 2nd Corps responds sluggishly to the directive to move south. Led by Jenkins' cavalry Rodes' division only begins arriving in the late afternoon. Despite taking the York Pike, Early's division is also delayed in arriving. Johnson's division and 1st Corps get in an unimaginable snarl on the road to Cashtown and the van of this 30,000 man column doesn't approach Cashtown until late afternoon on the 30th. THE NORTH: On June 30th Buford's cavalry division moves south from Fairfield, through Emmitsburg, and then north towards Gettysburg, patrolling the left flank of the army. Enemy horse is encountered near Gettysburg, backed by masses of infantry. The call goes out for support from the Union foot and a fight brews. It takes some time for the Union cavalry to sort things out after the confusion on the 29th. But, by mid morning on the 30th, Kilpatrick's division has picked up the axis of the Confederate cavalry's advance and is passing through Littlestown, moving up the pike toward Gettysburg. 12th Corps is under orders to march from Taneytown to Littlestown, but, is ordered to move towards Gettysburg from that location and proceeds up the Westminster Pike. 1st Corps gets word of the situation near Gettysburg around noon and the left wing of the army is ordered to move north. 1st Corps moves out rapidly, with 11th following closely behind. 3rd Corps, en route from Taneytown to Emmitsburg, also presses its move north. Gregg's cavalry division is detailed to cover the Union right rear and moves up along the Westminster Pike on the morning of the 1st. The army command hesitates on the issue of bringing the most remote reserves forward. By the time a decision is made and 2nd Corps moves out it is evening on the 30th. 5th Corps is similarly delayed and camps at Westminster, heading out from there at daybreak. 6th Corps misunderstands its orders and marches to Hanover before turning west.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 35_46.scn, 35_59.scn, 35_19.scn, 35_43.scn, 35_42.scn

36. Only half prepared III (var. 4)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the center route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown. Before work can begin on the third line the Union army makes its presence felt. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 7th. By the morning of the 8th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the additional line of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until ten a.m.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 36_16.scn, 36_1.scn, 36_2.scn, 36_7.scn, 36_12.scn

37. 2nd Corps moves west (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: July 1st, and elements of 2nd Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia move north of Gettysburg seeking to cross the mountains via the Chambersburg Pike. Two divisions of 2nd Corps have moved from Carlisle Barracks to Chambersburg via a route west of the mountains. Elements of 3rd Corps have advanced east of the mountains to cover the remaining division's move west. A skirmish on June 30th foreshadows more intense action on the 1st. The force east of the mountains needs to withdraw via the Pike by nightfall and reunite with the rest of the army in order to avoid the possibility of piecemeal destruction by the Army of the Potomac. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac is concentrated in northern Maryland. Elements of Buford's cavalry division screen to the north of the main body. On June 30th this force makes contact with Confederate infantry. Word goes back to bring up infantry support, setting the stage for a confrontation around the town of Gettysburg. Dawn on July 1st finds the Left Wing of the Union army in position to respond to the call. 1st Corps is camped at Marsh Creek, 3rd Corps at Bridgeport, and 11th Corps at Emmitsburg. 12th Corps, which is not part of the Left Wing, is at Littlestown. Elements of Stannard's brigade, newly transferred to 1st Corps, arrive during the day. Likewise, Lockewood's brigade, scraped together from troops in the east, arrives to bolster 12th Corps. While 1st and 11th Corps move out in a timely fashion, 3rd Corps is inexplicably delayed in moving to Gettysburg. 2nd Corps moves from the vicinity of Uniontown, camping near Gettysburg late on the night of July 1st. It rapidly becomes evident that the Confederate army is not moving to the east of the mountains, rather it is trying in to cross to the west side. A chance exists to defeat a portion of the Confederate force in detail.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 37_3.scn, 37_1.scn, 37_5.scn, 37_6.scn, 37_4.scn

38. Gregg moves west (var. 6)
THE NORTH: Late on July 2nd Gregg's cavalry division is given orders to reconnoiter north through Gettsyburg from the Union defensive line along Big Pipe Creek. By late afternoon on the 3rd the division travels through the Gettysburg area probing for signs of the rebel army. It encounters Confederate horse. One brigade has moved through Gettysburg along the Chambersburg Pike, while two are advancing on Fairfield. THE SOUTH: The Cavalry Division is tasked with the dual responsibilities of screening the army's shift to the Potomac and of divining the enemy's intentions if possible. By late on July 3rd the main body of the army has crossed the mountains and scouts along the length of the screen have been reporting the advance of Union horse for hours. Jenkins' brigade, covering the northern flank, withdraws toward Chambersburg well in advance of the Union troopers, while Imboden's and Rooney Lee's brigades have the lower passes of South Mountain well blocked and only skirmish. It is in the middle that the Confederate horse end up with a fight on their hands. With only hours to go before the sun sets the Union horse gets too close for comfort and the roads west must be defended. One brigade covers the Chambersburg Pike and three the route to Fairfield - and Hagerstown beyond.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 38_1.scn, 38_4.scn, 38_2.scn, 38_3.scn, 38_5.scn

39. The north wins the race (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: On July 1st, as the Army of Northern Virginia concentrates north of Gettysburg, elements of 3rd Corps get permission to advance on the town. The advance aims to both to feel out the Union presence detected there on June 30th, and to search for shoes rumored to be stored there - an item sorely needed by the rebel foot soldiers. As the lead elements near the vicinity of Gettysburg they encounter strong resistance from Union cavalry and soon the fight escalates. 2nd Corps is to move to Cashtown and link up with 3rd Corps. While Rodes' division is in transit pursuant to these orders word arrives of the fight brewing at Gettysburg and the division is turned south at Middletown. Early's division, originally ordered to move to Cashtown via Hunterstown and Mummasburg, had, due to the state of that road, already detoured to Heidlersburg, intending to move from there to Mummasburg. It was at Heidlersburg that the word to move south reached the division. Pender's division moves out after Heth's, accompanied by a battalion of the corps reserve artillery. Anderson's division, camped up the road at Fayetteville, moves out early in the morning, crossing South Mountain and arriving near Cashtown late in the morning. Johnson's division, after a march of some 25 miles along a road crowded with troops of 1st Corps, arrives near Cashtown at 4 p.m. The exhausted troops push on, followed by those of 1st Corps. Pickett's division, which had been left at Chambersburg guarding the army's rear, doesn't arrive till mid-afternoon on July 2nd. THE NORTH: The Union army moves north on June 30th intent on seeking out the Army of Northern Virginia and destroying it. 1st and 11th Corps advance from Emmitsburg behind the cavalry screen of Buford's division and camp near Gettysburg on the night of the 30th. 3rd Corps, the remainder of the left wing of the army, moves north on the Taneytown road and camps to the rear of Cemetery Ridge. It's an exhausted 12th Corps that collapses near dusk, having hoofed it all the way to Bonaughton to secure the right flank of the advance. Stannard's brigade, newly transferred to 1st Corps makes better time than expected. Likewise, Lockewood's brigade, scraped together from troops in the east, arrives to bolster 12th Corps. Kilpatrick's and Gregg's divisions arrive on July 2nd from their task of screening the Union right and right-rear, and Merritt's brigade arrives on the 3rd after screening the left. 2nd, 5th, and 6th Corps force march on the 30th. Due to the congestion near Taneytown caused by other elements of the Army of the Potomac, 2nd and 5th Corps are routed up the Pike to Emmitsburg, camping there on the 30th and pressing on to Gettysburg on July 1st. 6th Corps moves through Westminster and up the Pike, camping near Big Pipe Creek. It, too, moves out at first light on July 1st, heading for Gettysburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 39_46.scn, 39_16.scn, 39_29.scn, 39_22.scn, 39_43.scn

40. An interrupted shift to the west (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: July 1st, and elements of 2nd Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia move north of Gettysburg seeking to cross the mountains via the Chambersburg Pike. One division of 2nd Corps has moved from Carlisle Barracks to Chambersburg via a route west of the mountains. Elements of 3rd Corps have advanced east of the mountains to cover the other two divisions' move west. A skirmish on June 30th foreshadows more intense action on the 1st. The force east of the mountains needs to withdraw via the Pike by nightfall and reunite with the rest of the army in order to avoid the possibility of piecemeal destruction by the Army of the Potomac. What appears to be the entire army of the Potomac arrives on July 1st to contest this move. THE NORTH: The Union army moves north on June 30th intent on seeking out the Army of Northern Virginia and destroying it. 1st and 11th Corps advance from Emmitsburg behind the cavalry screen of Buford's division and camp near Gettysburg on the night of the 30th. 3rd Corps, the remainder of the left wing of the army, moves north on the Taneytown road and camps to the rear of Cemetery Ridge. It's an exhausted 12th Corps that collapses near dusk, having hoofed it all the way to Bonaughton to secure the right flank of the advance. Stannard's brigade, newly transferred to 1st Corps makes better time than expected. 2nd, 5th, and 6th Corps are rested on the 30th. On July 1st 2nd Corps moves from the vicinity of Uniontown via Taneytown, arriving in the area of Gettysburg that evening. 5th Corps follows 2nd on the Taneytown road and 6th Corps moves via Westminster up the Pike to Gettysburg arriving after nightfall on the 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 40_12.scn, 40_2.scn, 40_14.scn, 40_18.scn, 40_1.scn

41. Only half prepared I (var. 2)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances over each of the three routes, with an additional corps using the northern route, one using the southern route, and two employing the center passage. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown. Before work can begin on the third line the Union army makes its presence felt. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 7th. By the morning of the 8th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the additional line of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 41_2.scn, 41_7.scn, 41_12.scn, 41_14.scn, 41_15.scn

42. Only half prepared IV (var. 16)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the northern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. Moderate chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown. Before work can begin on the third line the Union army makes its presence felt. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 7th. By the morning of the 8th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the additional line of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until ten a.m.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 42_5.scn, 42_13.scn, 42_11.scn, 42_4.scn, 42_15.scn

43. Armageddon on the Potomac I (var. 11)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances over each of the three routes, with an additional corps using the northern route, one using the southern route, and two employing the center passage. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. Low chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek; the second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown; and the third on strong terrain covering the bridge at Falling Waters. By the evening of July 8th the work is completed. A good thing it is as the Union army begins to make its presence felt at that time. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions late that afternoon. By the morning of the 9th masses of infantry are appearing. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until eleven a.m.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 43_2.scn, 43_8.scn, 43_11.scn, 43_7.scn, 43_1.scn

44. Armageddon on the Potomac II (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the southern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek; the second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown; and the third on strong terrain covering the bridge at Falling Waters. By the evening of July 8th the work is completed. A good thing it is as the Union army begins to make its presence felt at that time. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions late that afternoon. By the morning of the 9th masses of infantry are appearing. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 44_11.scn, 44_10.scn, 44_12.scn, 44_7.scn, 44_9.scn

45. Armageddon on the Potomac III (var. 10)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the center route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. Low chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek; the second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown; and the third on strong terrain covering the bridge at Falling Waters. By the evening of July 8th the work is completed. A good thing it is as the Union army begins to make its presence felt at that time. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions late that afternoon. By the morning of the 9th masses of infantry are appearing. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 45_15.scn, 45_4.scn, 45_13.scn, 45_12.scn, 45_1.scn

46. Armageddon on the Potomac IV (var. 2)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the northern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek; the second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown; and the third on strong terrain covering the bridge at Falling Waters. By the evening of July 8th the work is completed. A good thing it is as the Union army begins to make its presence felt at that time. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions late that afternoon. By the morning of the 9th masses of infantry are appearing. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 46_11.scn, 46_12.scn, 46_9.scn, 46_1.scn, 46_10.scn

47. Preparations cut short I (var. 2)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances over each of the three routes, with an additional corps using the northern route, one using the southern route, and two employing the center passage. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The Union army responds far faster than hoped for. Cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 6th. By the morning of the 7th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the two additional lines of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 47_12.scn, 47_6.scn, 47_2.scn, 47_9.scn, 47_3.scn

48. Preparations cut short II (var. 13)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the southern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. Moderate chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The Union army responds far faster than hoped for. Cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 6th. By the morning of the 7th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the two additional lines of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 48_16.scn, 48_3.scn, 48_14.scn, 48_10.scn, 48_2.scn

49. Preparations cut short III (var. 5)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the center route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. High chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The Union army responds far faster than hoped for. Cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 6th. By the morning of the 7th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the two additional lines of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 49_14.scn, 49_2.scn, 49_10.scn, 49_16.scn, 49_1.scn

50. Preparations cut short IV (var. 1)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the northern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The Union army responds far faster than hoped for. Cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 6th. By the morning of the 7th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the two additional lines of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 50_2.scn, 50_5.scn, 50_1.scn, 50_15.scn, 50_4.scn

51. Concentration faced by opposition (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: On June 29th 1st and 3rd Corps, screened by three brigades of cavalry move to cross the mountains and concentrate on Gettysburg. At the same time the far flung elements of 2nd Corps are ordered to join the army at Gettysburg. The location of the rest of the cavalry remains a mystery to the army command. During the afternoon of the 29th the avant guard of the army pushes back a Union cavalry screen covering the mountain passage and the army moves to the east of this barrier. Union infantry has been detected late in the day supporting their mounted counterparts. Perhaps the move east won't be as easy as anticipated. 2nd Corps is sluggish in its response to the directive to concentrate on Gettysburg. Led by Jenkins' cavalry Rodes' division only begins arriving in mid afternoon followed by Johnson. Despite taking the York Pike, Early's division is also delayed in arriving. THE NORTH: The army has force marched its way north from Frederick, Maryland and environs. 3rd Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th in time to assist the cavalry screen in delaying what appeared to be a strong Confederate advance down the Chambersburg Pike. 12th Corps was hard on the heels of 3rd, and by nightfall was at the scene of the day's skirmishing. 1st and 11th Corps, moving via Taneytown, arrived at Gettysburg as night fell on the 29th. 5th and 2nd Corps made it as far as Emmitsburg and Taneytown respectively and will move out at dawn for Gettysburg. Two divisions of cavalry are off to the east covering the army's lines of communication from marauding Confederate cavalry, and won't be available for days. But the army is largely concentrated and now has a chance to do some damage. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, moves north from its camp south of Emmitsburg making good, but not great, time.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 51_2.scn, 51_8.scn, 51_1.scn, 51_3.scn, 51_6.scn

52. Rebels in Gettysburg! (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th 1st and 3rd Corps, screened by the cavalry division cross the mountains and concentrate on Gettysburg. At the same time the far flung elements of 2nd Corps are ordered to join the army at Gettysburg. The mountains are crossed without incident, and the army moves south on the 29th, taking up positions covering the crossings of Marsh Creek and the Taneytown Road. Late in the day some skirmishing takes place with Union cavalry, but there is no serious contact. The cavalry screens the left flank. 2nd Corps moves to join the army, and by the morning of the 30th is a few miles north of Gettysburg. The corps is exhausted from the recent forced marches and may not resume its march till 10 a.m. The 30th finds increased pressure and the arrival of Union infantry. THE NORTH: The army force marches north from Frederick, Maryland on June 29th. The Cavalry Corps screens the advance of the rest of the army. Late on the 29th, south of Gettysburg near Marsh Creek, horse soldiers skirmish with Confederate infantry. The cavalry backs off to await the arrival of infantry support. 3rd and 12th Corps camp in the vicinity of Emmitsburg on the 29th, while 1st and 11th Corps bed down near Taneytown. The advance north begins again at dawn on the 30th. It will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps are to move out in the predawn hours and make their appearance on map at 5 a.m. along the Emmitsburg Road, Frederick Pike, and Westminster Pike respectively. The marches of the last few days have taken their toll, however, and there is only a moderate likelihood that they will arrive on map in a timely fashion.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 52_2.scn, 52_8.scn, 52_9.scn, 52_11.scn, 52_3.scn

53. Marengo in the heartland I (var. 9)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown. The corps delays at Littlestown, however, and may not be available to move south on Westminster until 11 a.m. 1st and 3rd Corps are concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advance. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd and 11th Corps, the left wing of the army, closely follow the cavalry moving up the road to Emmitsburg. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at in the afternoon. 2nd and 6th Corps, the right wing of the army, move to cover Westminster. These troops have the longest march, moving from Barnesville and Poolesville respectively, and not arriving until 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the 29th. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 53_11.scn, 53_27.scn, 53_7.scn, 53_25.scn, 53_28.scn

54. Dug in and waiting (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: On June 27th 1st and 3rd Corps, screened by the cavalry division cross the mountains and concentrate on Gettysburg. At the same time the far flung elements of 2nd Corps are ordered to join the army at Gettysburg. The mountains are crossed without incident, and by nightfall on the 28th the army has massed at Gettysburg. On the 29th the army moves south, taking up positions along Marsh Creek, the Taneytown Road, and the Westminster Pike. They begin entrenching and await the hoped for arrival of the northern army. June 30th sees northern cavalry, then infantry, appear evidently intent on breaking the southern position. THE NORTH: The army force marches north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Emmitsburg road, the Frederick Pike, and via Westminster. The advance finds Taneytown, Emmitsburg, and Littlestown occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 54_1.scn

55. Marengo in the heartland III (var. 28)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown and on the Taneytown road and, pursuant to the plan, moves south at daybreak. 1st and 3rd Corps are concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advance. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 2nd and 6th Corps, the right wing of the army, move to cover Westminster. These troops have the longest march, moving from Barnesville and Poolesville respectively, and not arriving until 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the 29th. 11th and 1st Corps, after marching all the way from the Union left, arrive via Liberty beginning at noon. They are followed by 12th Corps which has worked its way all the way from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry and begins arriving at 6 p.m. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 55_17.scn, 55_21.scn, 55_15.scn, 55_4.scn, 55_2.scn

56. Only half prepared II (var. 7)
THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts south as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. The operations in Pennsylvania were successful, but most of the rebel army avoided combat with the Union forces. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 6th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the southern route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. High chance of reinforcements arriving on time. THE SOUTH: The plan was to construct a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first was to be along Antietam Creek. The second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown. Before work can begin on the third line the Union army makes its presence felt. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions in the late afternoon of July 7th. By the morning of the 8th masses of infantry are appearing and work on the additional line of entrenchments can't proceed. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. 3rd Corps, the army reserve, is held in place by its commander, and is not guaranteed of release until eleven a.m.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 56_8.scn, 56_9.scn, 56_5.scn, 56_2.scn, 56_14.scn

57. Marengo in the heartland IV (var. 32)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown and on the Taneytown road. It is inexplicably delayed in moving on the 29th, and may not start south until 11 a.m. 1st and 3rd Corps are concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advance. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at in the afternoon. 2nd and 6th Corps, the right wing of the army, move to cover Westminster. These troops have the longest march, moving from Barnesville and Poolesville respectively, and not arriving until 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the 29th. 11th Corps, after marching all the way from the Union left arrives via Liberty at noon. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 57_62.scn, 57_30.scn, 57_65.scn, 57_73.scn, 57_79.scn

58. Marengo in the heartland V (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown. The corps is delayed, however, and may not be able to move south on Westminster until 10 a.m. 1st Corps is concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg with 3rd Corps near Creagerstown. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advances. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps which started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at 1 p.m. 11th Corps, which has moved with 1st Corps from the extreme left of the army, has a long wait while the other troops move up the road, and arrives north of Frederick at 3 p.m. 6th Corps, after a horrendous and congested march from Poolesville, camps north of Frederick for the night, resuming it's advance up the Frederick pike at first light on the 30th. 2nd Corps moves to cover Westminster. These troops have a long march, moving from Barnesville, and not arriving until 9 a.m. on the 29th. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 58_10.scn, 58_24.scn, 58_11.scn, 58_28.scn, 58_19.scn

59. Marengo in the heartland VI (var. 19)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown. The corps is delayed, however, and may not be able to move south on Westminster until 10 a.m. 1st Corps is concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg with 3rd Corps near Creagerstown. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advances. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps which started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at 1 p.m. 11th Corps, which has moved with 1st Corps from the extreme left of the army, has a long wait while the other troops move up the road, and arrives north of Frederick at 3 p.m. 6th Corps, after a horrendous and congested march from Poolesville, camps north of Frederick for the night, resuming it's advance up the Frederick pike at first light on the 30th. 2nd Corps moves to cover Westminster. These troops have a long march, moving from Barnesville, and not arriving until 9 a.m. on the 29th. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 59_106.scn, 59_82.scn, 59_14.scn, 59_105.scn, 59_85.scn

60. Marengo in the heartland VII (var. 19)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown and on the Taneytown road. The corps is inexplicably delayed in heading out on the morning of the 29th and may not move south until noon. 1st Corps is concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg with 3rd Corps near Creagerstown. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advances. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps which started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at 1 p.m. 11th Corps, which has moved with 1st Corps from the extreme left of the army, has a long wait while the other troops move up the road, and arrives north of Frederick at 3 p.m. 6th Corps, after a horrendous and congested march from Poolesville, camps north of Frederick for the night, resuming it's advance up the Frederick pike at first light on the 30th. 2nd Corps moves to cover Westminster. These troops have a long march, moving from Barnesville, and not arriving until 9 a.m. on the 29th. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 60_10.scn, 60_15.scn, 60_6.scn, 60_27.scn, 60_20.scn

61. Marengo in the heartland VIII (var. 46)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown and on the Taneytown road. The corps is inexplicably delayed in heading out on the morning of the 29th and may not move south until 11 a.m. 1st Corps is concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg with 3rd Corps near Creagerstown. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advances. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at in the afternoon. 2nd and 6th Corps, the right wing of the army, move to cover Westminster. These troops have the longest march, moving from Barnesville and Poolesville respectively, and not arriving until 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the 29th. 11th Corps, after marching all the way from the Union left arrives via Liberty at noon. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 61_1.scn, 61_49.scn, 61_76.scn, 61_107.scn, 61_67.scn

62. Meeting engagement! II (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 29th. The crossing is accomplished in three columns. 2nd Corps moves straight down the Chambersburg pike, while 1st Corps travels via Fairfield, and 3rd Corps takes the road from Shippensburg to Arendtsville. The morning of the 30th finds 2nd Corps strung out along the pike a few miles from Gettysburg and the other two corps just completing their mountain crossings. The cavalry moves out and heads east and south, followed by the infantry. Union cavalry is encountered and the rest of the army rushes forward. The roads used by 1st and 3rd Corps are in terrible shape, and there is a high likelihood of extensive delays in these units arrival. THE NORTH: On June 29th the army probes north from Frederick, Maryland employing cavalry with strong infantry support. The Cavalry Corps screens the advance of the rest of the army. Dawn on the 30th finds the advance elements of the army south of Marsh Creek. As cavalry in that area moves north it clashes with Confederate horse soldiers and the call goes out for the rest of the army to hasten north. The advance north begins for the troops immediately available who the army command hopes will be able to gain time for the rest of the army to make its way to the field. The advance will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps, all still in the area of Frederick, move out upon getting word of the fight that is brewing. They won't make the area of operations until the afternoon of July 1st however. The marches of the past few days have worn heavily on the troops and there is only a moderate chance that these corps will show up in a timely fashion.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 62_7.scn, 62_3.scn, 62_4.scn, 62_12.scn, 62_8.scn

63. Encounters along South Mountain I (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: By the morning of the 27th the southern horse has crossed the Potomac and is moving to screen the rest of the army. As elements work their way north to supplement Imboden and Jenkins, other brigades move to screen the passages over South Mountain near Sharpsburg. Two additional brigades are resting at Sharpsburg in mid-afternoon when Union infantry begins to drive in the screening forces. It is not known whether this is a major move by the Union army, or merely a probing action. In either event it must be stopped. THE NORTH: June 27th and the entire army has managed to traverse the Potomac. With the whole Cavalry Corps still to the rear covering this movement, the westernmost corps of the army are ordered to probe over South Mountain to see what information can be gleaned as to the rebel army's disposition. 3rd Corps sorties a brigade sized force towards Boonsborough and Sharpsburg. They encounter resistance. A 2nd brigade sized force moves via Fox Gap. 12th Corps also moves forces toward Sharpsburg. A second brigade from 12th Corps probes toward Brownsville.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 63_1.scn, 63_8.scn, 63_3.scn, 63_6.scn, 63_2.scn

64. Encounters along South Mountain III (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: By the morning of the 27th the southern horse has crossed the Potomac and is moving to screen the rest of the army. As elements work their way north to supplement Imboden and Jenkins, other brigades move to screen the passages over South Mountain near Sharpsburg. Two additional brigades are resting at Sharpsburg in mid-afternoon when Union infantry begins to drive in the screening forces. It is not known whether this is a major move by the Union army, or merely a probing action. In either event it must be stopped. THE NORTH: June 27th and the entire army has managed to traverse the Potomac. With the whole Cavalry Corps still to the rear covering this movement, the westernmost corps of the army are ordered to probe over South Mountain to see what information can be gleaned as to the rebel army's disposition. 3rd Corps sorties a brigade sized force towards Boonsborough and Sharpsburg. They encounter resistance.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 64_6.scn, 64_1.scn, 64_2.scn, 64_4.scn, 64_3.scn

65. Probing at Sharpsburg (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: McLaws division is camped in the area around Sharpsburg, preparing to fortify the position for a hoped for Union advance. On July 1st the division clashes with Union cavalry moving from the direction of Harper's Ferry. Concern over the potential for additional attacks from other directions hinders the release of elements of the division other than the brigade directly on the road to Harper's Ferry. THE NORTH: By June 30th the lack of a major Confederate presence in Pennsylvania raises piques the curiosity of the Union command. The Cavalry Corps is ordered to aggressively probe along the entire front to see what can be determined as to the rebel intentions. Kilpatrick's division operates on the southern end of the mountains and probes towards Sharpsburg via Harper's Ferry, hoping to avoid the travails of forcing a passage over South Mountain. One brigade is committed.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 65_1.scn, 65_2.scn, 65_3.scn, 65_4.scn

66. Marengo in the heartland II (var. 24)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps is massed at Littlestown. The corps delays at Littlestown, however, and may not be available to move south on Westminster until 10 a.m. 1st and 3rd Corps are concentrated in the area surrounding Emmitsburg. They, too, move out at first light. Jenkins and Imboden are in support of 2nd Corps, while the rest of the cavalry division has raced north and is supporting 1st and 3rd Corps' advance. Take Westminster, Taneytown, Manchester, and the surrounding defensive terrain, and nothing lies between the army and Washington and Baltimore. The northern force will have to fight an offensive battle then - one in which their numerical superiority should be negated. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac races north on June 28th, pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carried with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to move the army north. By the evening of the 28th the cavalry had worked its way from the south side of the army north to screen the advance of the infantry. The exact disposition of the enemy forces is unknown and a screen is imperative. Dawn on the 29th finds the, now three division, Cavalry Corps advancing up the road to Emmitsburg, the Frederick pike, and towards Westminster via New Windsor. 3rd Corps, just enough force to support the cavalry on the left, follows closely on the heels of the horse. If the enemy is too strong on this wing, the corps will fall back on Frederick. 5th Corps, recently augmented by a brigade of the Pennsylvania Reserves sent from the defenses of Washington, advances immediately behind the cavalry along the Frederick pike. 1st Corps follows 5th. This delays 12th Corps which started from the vicinity of Harper's Ferry on the morning of the 28th, and which enters the arena at 1 p.m. 11th Corps, which has moved with 1st Corps from the extreme left of the army, has a long wait while the other troops move up the road, and arrives north of Frederick at 3 p.m. 2nd and 6th Corps, the right wing of the army, move to cover Westminster. These troops have the longest march, moving from Barnesville and Poolesville respectively, and not arriving until 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the 29th. Army command and the artillery reserve wait the passage of the infantry columns up the Frederick pike and then move north at 6 p.m. on June 29th. The Union army is further augmented by Stannard's brigade from Washington's defenses which arrives via Frederick late in the afternoon of June 30th, and Lockwood's brigade which follows on the morning of July 1st. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 66_23.scn, 66_86.scn, 66_8.scn, 66_48.scn, 66_92.scn

67. Encounters along South Mountain II (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: By the morning of the 27th the southern horse has crossed the Potomac and is moving to screen the rest of the army. As elements work their way north to supplement Imboden and Jenkins, other brigades move to screen the passages over South Mountain near Sharpsburg. Two additional brigades are resting at Sharpsburg in mid-afternoon when Union infantry begins to drive in the screening forces. It is not known whether this is a major move by the Union army, or merely a probing action. In either event it must be stopped. THE NORTH: June 27th and the entire army has managed to traverse the Potomac. With the whole Cavalry Corps still to the rear covering this movement, the westernmost corps of the army are ordered to probe over South Mountain to see what information can be gleaned as to the rebel army's disposition. 3rd Corps sorties a brigade sized force towards Boonsborough and Sharpsburg. They encounter resistance. 12th Corps also moves forces toward Sharpsburg. A second brigade from 12th Corps probes toward Brownsville.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 67_7.scn, 67_5.scn, 67_3.scn, 67_4.scn, 67_2.scn

68. Along the pike (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: As the Army of Northern Virginia prepares to greet northern guests on the Potomac, the Confederate horse operates boldly all along the front, seeking information on the status of the Yankee army. On July 1st a brigade pushes down the pike towards Emmitsburg and encounters a distinctly unfriendly welcome. Shortly thereafter support arrives in the form of another brigade of horse. THE NORTH: By July 1st the lack of information regarding the intentions of the rebel army prompts the Army of the Potomac's command to order the Cavalry Corps to patrol aggressively, seeking out information on the southern forces. A brigade of cavalry on such a mission finds firsthand information near Emmitsburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 68_6.scn, 68_1.scn, 68_5.scn, 68_2.scn, 68_3.scn

69. The northern approaches (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: July 1st finds the Confederate cavalry aggressively patrolling, seeking information on the Union dispositions and plans, while covering the withdrawal to the Potomac. On the northern edge of the screen a brigade mixes it up with like minded northern cavalry. THE NORTH: After the scare of late June, by July 1st the rebel army seems to have all but disappeared from Pennsylvania. The question is - where is it, and what are its intentions? On July 1st the Cavalry Corps is ordered to answer these questions by aggressively probing west all along the front. On the northern edge of this line a brigade encounters resistance near Fairfield.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 69_4.scn, 69_1.scn, 69_3.scn, 69_2.scn, 69_6.scn

70. A belated move north (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: On June 29th the army, screened by the cavalry division crosses the mountains, with the van arriving in Gettysburg midmorning on the 30th. The army then spreads south and east, taking up positions along Marsh Creek, the Taneytown Road, and the Westminster Pike. Late in the day northern cavalry, then infantry, appear evidently intent on breaking the southern position. THE NORTH: On June 30th the army races north from Frederick, Maryland in response to news that the rebel army is moving on Gettysburg. the lead element of the army consists of cavalry with strong infantry support. Late on the 30th, south of Gettysburg near Marsh Creek, horse soldiers skirmish with Confederate infantry. The cavalry backs off to await the arrival of infantry support. The advance north will begin again at dawn on the 1st employing the troops at hand, hoping to gain time while the rest of the army makes its way to the field. It will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps, all still hung up in the area surrounding Frederick, move out in the predawn hours arriving in the area of operations during the afternoon along the Emmitsburg Road, Frederick Pike, and Westminster Pike respectively. The marches of the last few days have taken their toll, however, and there is only a low likelihood that they will arrive on map in a timely fashion.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 70_1.scn, 70_2.scn, 70_3.scn, 70_4.scn

71. Massed along the pike II (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th with all three corps moving directly down the Chambersburg pike. Late that afternoon the column encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The morning of July 1st find the army strung out along the Chambersburg pike. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. The pike, while the best road over the mountains, has been severely congested by the entire army's use of this route. There is the possibility significant delays in the arrival of the remainder of the army. THE NORTH: The army moved north from Frederick, Maryland and environs on June 28th. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. 1st and 11th Corps arrive that night. During the course of the 30th 2nd and 5th Corps arrive. As these units arrive the defensive position is being strengthened. Late on the 30th Union infantry and cavalry skirmish with, first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, gets on the road early, and marches with a vengeance on its way north.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 71_3.scn, 71_4.scn, 71_8.scn, 71_7.scn, 71_10.scn

72. Three approaches I (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th. The crossing is accomplished in three columns. 2nd Corps moves straight down the Chambersburg pike, while 1st Corps travels via Fairfield, and 3rd Corps takes the road from Shippensburg to Arendtsville. Late that afternoon the column moving down the Chambersburg Pike encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The other two corps are just completing their mountain crossings during the morning of July 1st. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. The roads used by 1st and 3rd Corps are in terrible shape, and there is a high likelihood of extensive delays in these units arrival. THE NORTH: The army has force marched its way north from Frederick, Maryland and environs. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. By late afternoon on the 30th Union infantry and a cavalry division skirmish with first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 1st and 11th Corps, moving via Taneytown, arrived at Gettysburg as night fell on the 30th. 5th and 2nd Corps made it as far as Emmitsburg and Taneytown respectively and will move out at dawn for Gettysburg. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, is delayed in its start from its camp south of Emmitsburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 72_7.scn, 72_10.scn, 72_4.scn, 72_3.scn, 72_9.scn

73. Massed along the pike I (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th with all three corps moving directly down the Chambersburg pike. Late that afternoon the column encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The morning of July 1st find the army strung out along the Chambersburg pike. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. The pike, while the best road over the mountains, has been severely congested by the entire army's use of this route. There is the possibility significant delays in the arrival of the remainder of the army. THE NORTH: The army has force marched its way north from Frederick, Maryland and environs. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. By late afternoon on the 30th Union infantry and a cavalry division skirmish with first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 1st and 11th Corps, moving via Taneytown, arrived at Gettysburg as night fell on the 30th. 5th and 2nd Corps made it as far as Emmitsburg and Taneytown respectively and will move out at dawn for Gettysburg. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, is delayed in its start from its camp south of Emmitsburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 73_3.scn, 73_7.scn, 73_4.scn, 73_10.scn, 73_5.scn

74. No half measures (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. By the mid day on June 30th a defensive position south and east of Gettysburg has been established and improved. The Union army begins arriving and the theater heats up. THE NORTH: The army probes north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Emmitsburg road, the Frederick Pike, and via Westminster. The advance finds Taneytown, Emmitsburg, and Littlestown occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength. The rest of the army, concentrated near Frederick, is called forward. This advance is handled poorly, and hampered by severe congestion of the road net. As a result of these problems there is a high likelihood of delay in the arrival of reinforcements.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 74_1.scn, 74_2.scn, 74_3.scn, 74_4.scn

75. Concentrated advance (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. By the mid day on June 30th a defensive position south and east of Gettysburg has been established and improved. Just in time as the northern army appears in force. THE NORTH: The army shifts north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Emmitsburg road, the Frederick Pike, and via Westminster. The advance finds Taneytown, Emmitsburg, and Littlestown occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength. The routes are congested and the march north a shambles. There is a high likelihood of delay in the arrival of reinforcements.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 75_1.scn, 75_2.scn, 75_3.scn, 75_4.scn

76. The whole army moves north (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. By the end of June 30th a defensive position south and east of Gettysburg has been established and improved. It's afternoon on the 1st before significant Federal pressure begins to build. THE NORTH: The army force marches north from Frederick, Maryland on July 1st. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Emmitsburg road, the Frederick Pike, and via Westminster. The advance finds Taneytown, Emmitsburg, and Littlestown occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength. The routes are crowded and the march has its problems. There is the possibility of delay in the arrival of reinforcements.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 76_1.scn, 76_2.scn, 76_3.scn, 76_4.scn

77. Meeting engagement! IV (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 29th. The crossing is accomplished in three columns. 2nd Corps moves straight down the Chambersburg pike, while 1st Corps travels via Fairfield, and 3rd Corps takes the road from Shippensburg to Arendtsville. The morning of the 30th finds 2nd Corps strung out along the pike a few miles from Gettysburg and the other two corps just completing their mountain crossings. The cavalry moves out and heads east and south, followed by the infantry. Union cavalry is encountered and the rest of the army rushes forward. The roads used by 1st and 3rd Corps are in bad shape, and there is a moderate chance of delay in these units arrival. THE NORTH: On June 29th the army probes north from Frederick, Maryland employing cavalry with strong infantry support. The Cavalry Corps screens the advance of the rest of the army. Dawn on the 30th finds the advance elements of the army south of Marsh Creek. As cavalry in that area moves north it clashes with Confederate horse soldiers and the call goes out for the rest of the army to hasten north. The advance north begins for the troops immediately available who the army command hopes will be able to gain time for the rest of the army to make its way to the field. The advance will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps, all still in the area of Frederick, move out upon getting word of the fight that is brewing. They won't make the area of operations until the afternoon of July 1st however. The marches of the past few days have worn heavily on the troops and there is only a moderate chance that these corps will show up in a timely fashion.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 77_5.scn, 77_4.scn, 77_9.scn, 77_8.scn, 77_15.scn

78. Meeting engagement! III (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 29th. The morning of the 30th finds it strung out along the pike a few miles from Gettysburg. The cavalry moves out and heads east and south, followed by 2nd Corps. Union cavalry is encountered and the rest of the army rushes forward. The long column on the pike has proven to be unwieldy. 1st and 3rd Corps may experience moderate delays in their march. THE NORTH: On June 29th the army moves north from Frederick, Maryland. The Cavalry Corps screens the advance of the rest of the army. Dawn on the 30th finds the advance elements of the army south of Marsh Creek. As cavalry in that area moves north it clashes with Confederate horse soldiers and the call goes out for the rest of the army to hasten north. The advance north begins for the troops immediately available who the army command hopes will be able to gain time for the rest of the army to make its way to the field. The advance will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps, all still miles away, press north. They won't make the area of operations until the morning of July 1st at best. These corps have had the longest marches in recent days, and there is a moderate chance that their appearance will be delayed.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 78_10.scn, 78_1.scn, 78_15.scn, 78_14.scn, 78_7.scn

79. From out of the west III (var. 124)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains, then leaves the road to move north of Goose Creek. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army began shifting north to Frederick, Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac concentrates along the main routes from the Valley in response to the increased Confederate pressure. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. The corps of the Union army which have yet to move north don't receive any orders due to a snafu at army headquarters and don't respond to the appearance of the rebel horse until nightfall on the 24th. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed and it is not until the 25th that they begin to arrive. Also on the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 79_212.scn, 79_42.scn, 79_262.scn, 79_26.scn, 79_157.scn

80. From out of the west I (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is balanced in nature, mainly along the Snicker's and Ashbey's Gap Turnpikes where it screens the advance of 1st and 3rd Corps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army began shifting north to Frederick, Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. The corps of the Union army which have yet to move north don't receive any orders due to a snafu at army headquarters. It is morning on the 25th before they begin to react to the Confederate presence. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and delays may occur in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Also on the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 80_140.scn, 80_15.scn, 80_25.scn, 80_205.scn, 80_29.scn

81. Cavalry skirmishes (var. 32)
THE SOUTH: Confederate cavalry, probing south from the army's position around Gettysburg, encounters Union horse north of Big Pipe Creek in the late afternoon of June 30th. The Confederate force enters on the road to Two Taverns and along the Gettysburg Pike. The cavalry clash lasts till nightfall as each side attempts to gather intelligence on the enemy's position and plans. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps screens the Union army as it digs in along Pipe Creek. In the afternoon of June 30th rebel horse approaches and a fight develops which lasts till dark. Each side tries to collect information on the other's dispositions and plans. North of the center of the Union line the horse screens a wide area north of Westminster. Two brigades of the Second Division are deployed forward, with one held in reserve.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 81_25.scn, 81_34.scn, 81_23.scn, 81_57.scn, 81_10.scn

82. The fight north I (var. 20)
THE SOUTH: The army moves east and south on the 27th. 2nd Corps moves from Chambersburg via Gettysburg and Littlestown to Westminster while the rest of the army moves directly over the mountains without having moved further north. By the 29th the command is taking up and improving defensive positions along Little Pipe Creek. Digging in continues non-stop throughout June 30th as the cavalry screen relays intelligence on the Union army's progress north. The Yanks are coming, but where they will make their play is still very up in the air, so substantial reserves back up the rest of the army which covers a very broad front. July 1st sees the Union forces make their presence known. THE NORTH: The main body of the Army of the Potomac begins moving north from around Manassas on June 27th. Additional intelligence turns the move north into a race north with the army pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carries with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to spur the army north. Plans for a concentration at Frederick or for forming a defensive line fall by the wayside as reports have the rebel forces already entering northern Maryland on June 29th. The army moves north along several axes screened by the Cavalry Corps which attempts to provide intelligence as to the enemy's dispositions. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 82_16.scn, 82_15.scn, 82_17.scn, 82_2.scn, 82_6.scn

83. Hasty movement (var. 66)
THE SOUTH: The army begins the move over the mountains late in the afternoon on June 27th. The army marches till midnight and resumes at dawn on the 28th. The army advances en masse down the Chambersburg pike. The cavalry screen is active in covering this movement and reporting on Union strength. By mid day the advance contacts Union outposts and the infantry begin to deploy. Stiff resistance is expected. The pike, while the best road over the mountains, has been severely congested by the entire army's use of this route. There is the possibility significant delays in the arrival of the remainder of the army. THE NORTH: 11th Corps is in the lead of the army rushing north. It passes through Emmitsburg on June 27th, and then encounters Confederate cavalry south of Gettysburg. This covering force is driven in with no more than minor skirmishes occurring. Nightfall on the 27th finds Gettysburg occupied by 11th Corps. Word from the local population and scouts has the Confederate army everywhere at once. Pickets are pushed out in all directions from the town. 1st Corps comes up from Emmitsburg during the morning of the 28th. Confederate infantry is spotted advancing from the west around noon, just as 1st Corps is arriving. The rest of the army rushes north. The arrival of these forces occurs over a three day period, as some of the army has had to march all the way from northern Virginia. The Cavalry Corps actually has the longest march of any element of the army as it has to move from screening the west and south flanks of the army in Virginia to covering the northern edge of the advance to Pennsylvania. One division of cavalry hurries north to try and catch up with the infantry advance. Two divisions patrol the eastern flank of the army and arrive during the morning of July 2nd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 83_9.scn, 83_51.scn, 83_69.scn, 83_68.scn, 83_19.scn

84. From the four corners they come (var. 203)
THE SOUTH: The discovery on June 27th of Union infantry moving via Emmitsburg towards Gettysburg is promptly communicated by Jenkins' scouts to Early's division. During the night of the 27th Early prepares to reverse course and move on Gettysburg. Word went to the main army and the other divisions of 2nd Corps at the same time it was sent to Early. Gordon's brigade marches all night and unites with Early in time to start the march west at first light. By noon on the 28th the division is nearing Gettysburg. Word is sent north to the rest of 2nd Corps. Troops are immediately put in motion, some taking the road by 2 a.m. on the 28th. The long column, led by Jenkins' cavalry brigade begins to appear in the early afternoon of June 28th. The main body of the army gets word of the Union movement north almost as soon as Early's division. 1st and 3rd Corps are set in motion from Chambersburg on the morning of the 28th, screened by Imboden's command. The foot can't keep pace with the cavalry screen and it's not till dusk that the infantry clears the mountains. "Grumble" Jones' and Robertson's commands experience delays in transit from Virginia, not arriving until the morning of June 29th. Three brigades of the Cavalry Division, "of necessity" ride around the Union army. They draw a good deal of attention from northern horse, and lose contact with the main body of the army. This game of hide and seek diverts Union cavalry, so it serves some purpose. It also delays the arrival of the army's eyes until July 2nd. THE NORTH: 11th Corps is in the lead of the army rushing north. It passes through Emmitsburg on June 27th, arriving in Gettysburg that night. Word from the local population and scouts has the Confederate army everywhere at once. Pickets are pushed out in all directions from the town. 1st Corps comes up from Emmitsburg during the morning of the 28th. Confederate infantry is spotted advancing from the east around noon, just as 1st Corps is arriving. The rest of the army rushes north. The arrival of these forces occurs over a three day period, as some of the army has had to march all the way from northern Virginia. A tremendous pace is set and some units manage to arrive earlier than anticipated. The Cavalry Corps actually has the longest march of any element of the army as it has to move from screening the west and south flanks of the army in Virginia to covering the northern edge of the advance to Pennsylvania. The job is complicated by masses of rebel horse loose in the Union rear. One division is ordered to catch up with the infantry advance, while two pursue the marauding Confederate cavalry. The pursuit is broken off and these two divisions begin arriving during the morning of July 1st.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 84_140.scn, 84_153.scn, 84_114.scn, 84_231.scn, 84_59.scn

85. Three approaches III (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th. The crossing is accomplished in three columns. 2nd Corps moves straight down the Chambersburg pike, while 1st Corps travels via Fairfield, and 3rd Corps takes the road from Shippensburg to Arendtsville. Late that afternoon the column moving down the Chambersburg Pike encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The other two corps are just completing their mountain crossings during the morning of July 1st. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. THE NORTH: The army probed north from Frederick, Maryland and environs on June 28th. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. Word goes out to bring the rest of the army forward as a Confederate advance is in the wind. 1st and 11th Corps arrive early on the 30th. During the course of the 30th 2nd and 5th Corps arrive. Late on the 30th Union infantry and cavalry skirmish with, first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, is delayed in its start from its camp south of Emmitsburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 85_10.scn, 85_6.scn, 85_2.scn, 85_7.scn, 85_3.scn

86. Massed along the pike III (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th with all three corps moving directly down the Chambersburg pike. Late that afternoon the column encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The morning of July 1st find the army strung out along the Chambersburg pike. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. The pike, while the best road over the mountains, has been severely congested by the entire army's use of this route. There is a moderate probability of significant delays in the arrival of the remainder of the army. THE NORTH: The army probed north from Frederick, Maryland and environs on June 28th. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. Word goes out to bring the rest of the army forward as a Confederate advance is in the wind. 1st and 11th Corps arrive early on the 30th. During the course of the 30th 2nd and 5th Corps arrive. Late on the 30th Union infantry and cavalry skirmish with, first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, is delayed in its start from its camp south of Emmitsburg.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 86_6.scn, 86_5.scn, 86_1.scn, 86_4.scn, 86_10.scn

87. Three approaches II (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 30th. The crossing is accomplished in three columns. 2nd Corps moves straight down the Chambersburg pike, while 1st Corps travels via Fairfield, and 3rd Corps takes the road from Shippensburg to Arendtsville. Late that afternoon the column moving down the Chambersburg Pike encounters first cavalry and, then, infantry, blocking their advance. The other two corps are just completing their mountain crossings during the morning of July 1st. Sunrise on July 1st reveals a different picture than that expected. Rough day coming. The roads used by 1st and 3rd Corps are in bad shape, and there is a possibility of delays in these units arrival. THE NORTH: The army moved north from Frederick, Maryland and environs on June 28th. 3rd Corps and 12th Corps arrived at Gettysburg on the afternoon of June 29th. They advance west of town and occupy good defensive terrain. 1st and 11th Corps arrive that night. During the course of the 30th 2nd and 5th Corps arrive. As these units arrive the defensive position is being strengthened. Late on the 30th Union infantry and cavalry skirmish with, first Confederate cavalry, and then, infantry. 6th Corps, the tail of the army, gets on the road early, and marches with a vengeance on its way north.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 87_2.scn, 87_9.scn, 87_10.scn, 87_1.scn, 87_8.scn

88. Meeting engagement! I (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The army moves over the mountains from Chambersburg on June 29th. The morning of the 30th finds it strung out along the pike a few miles from Gettysburg. The cavalry moves out and heads east and south, followed by 2nd Corps. Union cavalry is encountered and the rest of the army rushes forward. The long column on the pike has proven to be unwieldy. 1st and 3rd Corps may experience severe delays in their march. THE NORTH: On June 29th the army probes north from Frederick, Maryland employing cavalry with strong infantry support. The Cavalry Corps screens the advance of the rest of the army. Dawn on the 30th finds the advance elements of the army south of Marsh Creek. As cavalry in that area moves north it clashes with Confederate horse soldiers and the call goes out for the rest of the army to hasten north. The advance north begins for the troops immediately available who the army command hopes will be able to gain time for the rest of the army to make its way to the field. The advance will not go unopposed. 5th, 2nd and 6th Corps, all still in the area of Frederick, move out upon getting word of the fight that is brewing. They won't make the area of operations until the afternoon of July 1st however. The marches of the past few days have worn heavily on the troops and there is only a moderate chance that these corps will show up in a timely fashion.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 88_4.scn, 88_13.scn, 88_5.scn, 88_10.scn, 88_2.scn

89. From out of the west II (var. 196)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap. Only one brigade screens the advance via Ashbey's Gap. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army remained in place in the area west and south of Manassas while sending two corps north of the Potomac to screen any rebel forces that have crossed the river. Contact with the rebel army is all but lost on the 21st despite aggressive scouting. But on the 23rd reports from north of the Potomac indicate that the rebel infantry has vanished from that area. The corps north of the river are ordered to return to the south bank. By the 24th pressure is increasing to the west of the army, culminating in masses of Confederate cavalry appearing on the afternoon of the 24th - surely the sign of infantry to come. The five corps of the Union army which are still south of the Potomac are delayed in responding to the appearance of the rebel horse, not reacting until nightfall. 1st and 11th Corps, dispatched across the Potomac to shield Washington from rebels north of the river, promptly respond to the call to recross the river, arriving on June 25th. On the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 89_99.scn, 89_161.scn, 89_127.scn, 89_228.scn, 89_135.scn

90. Block the Crossings (var. 3)
THE NORTH: 1st and 11th Corps have moved north of the Potomac, and aggressively patrol towards Hagerstown and the river crossings in that area. By the morning of June 26th Sharpsburg and Boonsborough are occupied. The local population confirms earlier intelligence reports that large bodies of Confederate troops had been in the area. These forces are not present late on the 25th as the Union forces cross the mountains. That situation changes rapidly as Rebel infantry is encountered on the 26th as the two corps move further west. Care must be exercised as the main body of the Union army lies miles and a river crossing away. THE SOUTH: By the morning of June 26th, 3rd Corps had already crossed the Potomac and moved north. Pickett's division and the artillery of 1st Corps had crossed the evening before. McLaws and Hood were preparing to cross into Maryland. Intelligence reports during the night put Union forces in the area, but the accuracy of these reports, and the whereabouts and strength of any northern forces that might be present are unknown. Let's just say that the situation becomes less ambiguous over the course of the day. Anderson's division and the 3rd Corps' artillery reserve had camped near Hagerstown on the evening of June 25th. After moving up the pike towards Greencastle early on the 26th, word of Union forces to the west of the mountains reaches this force. After some hesitation, further word arrives from 1st Corps requesting assistance and the force backtracks towards Hagerstown.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 90_1.scn, 90_2.scn, 90_3.scn, 90_4.scn

91. The fight north II (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The Cavalry Division finds the federal strength around Manassas too strong to circumvent. When it reports the Army of the Potomac's movement north to army command, it too moves north via Sharpsburg, screening the right flank of the Confederate command. In response to the order to move south 2nd Corps masses at Littlestown by the 29th, and reaches Westminster on the 30th, deploying from there as the left of the Confederate army. Jenkins and Imboden screen 2nd Corps. 1st and 3rd Corps move out from Chambersburg on the 28th, screened by the remainder of the cavalry. The van of this force camps around Gettysburg that evening, moving south to Emmitsburg on the 29th. The reunited Confederate army masses along the pike between Emmitsburg and Westminster. The cavalry division is deployed to the front of this troop concentration. Once the axis of the Union army's advance is determined, the entire rebel force will be able to deploy appropriately. July 1st finds the army in place as the northern host makes its appearance. THE NORTH: The main body of the Army of the Potomac begins moving north from around Manassas on June 27th. Additional intelligence turns the move north into a race north with the army pausing only shortly for a change in command and a shakeup in its organization. The change in command carries with it a demand that action be taken - now - regarding the invading Confederate army. That demand, coupled with the news that the opposing army is far closer to the capitol than expected, is the fuel needed to spur the army north. Plans for a concentration at Frederick or for forming a defensive line fall by the wayside as reports have the rebel forces already entering northern Maryland on June 29th. The army moves north along several axes screened by the Cavalry Corps which attempts to provide intelligence as to the enemy's dispositions. Given the consternation the Confederate army has caused, both in the capital and in army command, and the resulting confusion in the army, coordination is impaired. Arrival times are approximate and may vary greatly.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 91_11.scn, 91_50.scn, 91_5.scn, 91_12.scn, 91_8.scn

92. From out of the west IV (var. 134)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains, then leaves the road to move north of Goose Creek. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army remained in place in the area west and south of Manassas while sending two corps north of the Potomac to screen any rebel forces that have crossed the river. Contact with the rebel army is all but lost on the 21st despite aggressive scouting. But on the 23rd reports from north of the Potomac indicate that the rebel infantry has vanished from that area. The corps north of the river are ordered to return to the south bank. By the 24th pressure is increasing to the west of the army, culminating in masses of Confederate cavalry appearing on the afternoon of the 24th - surely the sign of infantry to come. Army command still doesn't fully believe that the rebel army has shifted back south of the river, and holds the five corps of the Union army which are still south of the Potomac in place until the morning of June 25th. 1st and 11th Corps, dispatched across the Potomac to shield Washington from rebels north of the river, have perhaps been too enthusiastic in their duty and must reverse course all the way from South Mountain to respond to the call to recross the river. These elements don't arrive until June 26th. On the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 92_41.scn, 92_135.scn, 92_217.scn, 92_259.scn, 92_267.scn

93. From out of the west V (var. 102)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army began shifting north to Frederick, Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. The corps of the Union army which have yet to move north don't receive any orders due to a snafu at army headquarters. It is morning on the 25th before they begin to react to the Confederate presence. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and major delays should be expected in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Also on the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 93_26.scn, 93_157.scn, 93_128.scn, 93_3.scn, 93_14.scn

94. From out of the west VI (var. 117)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army remained in place in the area west and south of Manassas while sending two corps north of the Potomac to screen any rebel forces that have crossed the river. Contact with the rebel army is all but lost on the 21st despite aggressive scouting. But on the 23rd reports from north of the Potomac indicate that the rebel infantry has vanished from that area. The corps north of the river are ordered to return to the south bank. By the 24th pressure is increasing to the west of the army, culminating in masses of Confederate cavalry appearing on the afternoon of the 24th - surely the sign of infantry to come. The five corps of the Union army which are still south of the Potomac promptly respond to the appearance of the rebel horse. 1st and 11th Corps, tasked to screen the capitol from the rebel forces north of the river, far exceed their orders and have crossed South Mountain before the order comes to return to the main body of the army. It's the 27th of June before they are able to link up with the rest of the army. At least there is positive confirmation that the rebel infantry has left the north side of the river. The Union government is seized by panic, and elements from the Washington defenses, scheduled to reinforce the field army, are recalled to the defend of the capitol.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 94_106.scn, 94_141.scn, 94_247.scn, 94_4.scn, 94_234.scn

95. From out of the west VII (var. 78)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Ashbey's Gap Pike over the mountains and advances to the east. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army began shifting north to Frederick, Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. The corps of the Union army which have yet to move north promptly respond to the appearance of the rebel horse. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and major delays should be expected in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Also on the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 95_209.scn, 95_182.scn, 95_185.scn, 95_176.scn, 95_204.scn

96. From out of the west VIII (var. 17)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is balanced in nature, mainly along the Snicker's and Ashbey's Gap Turnpikes where it screens the advance of 1st and 3rd Corps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Ashbey's Gap Pike over the mountains and advances to the east. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army remained in place in the area west and south of Manassas while sending two corps north of the Potomac to screen any rebel forces that have crossed the river. Contact with the rebel army is all but lost on the 21st despite aggressive scouting. But on the 23rd reports from north of the Potomac indicate that the rebel infantry has vanished from that area. The corps north of the river are ordered to return to the south bank. By the 24th pressure is increasing to the west of the army, culminating in masses of Confederate cavalry appearing on the afternoon of the 24th - surely the sign of infantry to come. The five corps of the Union army which are still south of the Potomac are delayed in responding to the appearance of the rebel horse, not reacting until nightfall. 1st and 11th Corps, dispatched across the Potomac to shield Washington from rebels north of the river, have perhaps been too enthusiastic in their duty and must reverse course all the way from South Mountain to respond to the call to recross the river. These elements don't arrive until June 26th. On the 25th the army also is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. The army command is seized by inertia and both it and the Artillery Reserve are delayed in arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 96_97.scn, 96_135.scn, 96_175.scn, 96_266.scn, 96_127.scn

97. From out of the west IX (var. 71)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is balanced in nature, mainly along the Snicker's and Ashbey's Gap Turnpikes where it screens the advance of 1st and 3rd Corps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army began its long march to northern Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. By the afternoon of June 24th 6th Corps - the only army corps still south of the river when the order to countermarch arrived - has camped north of Goose Creek. Despite the news late in the day of the arrival of large numbers of Confederate cavalry, the decision is made to delay the advance of the corps until dawn, rather than chance around with marauding Confederate cavalry at night. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and delays may occur in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Army command seems to be seized by inertia and is delayed in responding to the field, along with the guns of the Artillery Reserve. Panic seizes the nation's capitol and elements of the Washington defenses, scheduled to transferred to the Army of the Potomac, are retained in order to man the local defenses. 2nd, 5th, and 12th Corps, after a brutal countermarch and delays due to chaos at the river crossing, begin arriving during the evening of the 26th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 97_27.scn, 97_117.scn, 97_61.scn, 97_76.scn, 97_30.scn

98. From out of the west X (var. 282)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the south with the mass of the horse advancing via Ashbey's Gap. Only one brigade screens the advance via Snicker's Gap. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains, then leaves the road to move north of Goose Creek. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then moving to the north side of Goose Creek as it continues to the east. THE NORTH: The army began its long march to northern Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. By the afternoon of June 24th 6th Corps - the only army corps still south of the river when the order to countermarch arrived - has camped north of Goose Creek. Despite the news late in the day of the arrival of large numbers of Confederate cavalry, the decision is made to delay the advance of the corps until dawn, rather than chance around with marauding Confederate cavalry at night. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and major delays should be expected in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Army command seems to be seized by inertia and is delayed in responding to the field, along with the guns of the Artillery Reserve. Also on the 25th the army is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. 2nd, 5th, and 12th Corps, detoured towards Washington, and then further delayed at the river, don't begin arriving during the morning of the 27th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 98_166.scn, 98_39.scn, 98_209.scn, 98_198.scn, 98_97.scn

99. From out of the west XI (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is balanced in nature, mainly along the Snicker's and Ashbey's Gap Turnpikes where it screens the advance of 1st and 3rd Corps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It advances over the mountains via the Snicker's Gap Pike then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Snicker's Gap Pike over the mountains and continues along that fast paced route. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army began its long march to northern Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. By the afternoon of June 24th 6th Corps - the only army corps still south of the river when the order to countermarch arrived - has camped north of Goose Creek, and doesn't get back on the road south until news of the day arrives near dark. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and major delays should be expected in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Army command seems to be seized by inertia and is delayed in responding to the field, along with the guns of the Artillery Reserve. Also on the 25th the army is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. 2nd, 5th, and 12th Corps, detoured towards Washington, and then further delayed at the river, don't begin arriving during the morning of the 27th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 99_17.scn, 99_131.scn, 99_77.scn, 99_26.scn, 99_103.scn

100. From out of the west XII (var. 113)
THE SOUTH: By June 21st the pressure from Union cavalry and infantry in northern Virginia had decreased. Now for the switch. It appears that the Union army is shifting north. Banking on the normal slow movement of that body, the southern command recalls 2nd Corps from across the river, and sets 1st and 3rd Corps moving eastward hoping to catch the Union army in transition from the south bank of the Potomac to the north, and defeat it in detail. Only Imboden's command is left north of the Potomac, tasked to generate as much confusion and damage as possible. The move east begins on June 24th and is screened by most of the Confederate cavalry. By the afternoon of the 24th significant contact is being had west of the Bull Run Mountains. The cavalry's approach is focused to the north with the mass of the horse advancing via Snicker's Gap, then sidestepping to move north of Goose Creek on Outland Mills. Only one brigade apiece screen the advances over Snicker's and Ashbey's Gaps. 1st Corps leads the way for the infantry of the army. It crosses the mountains on the Ashbey's Gap Pike, and then continues along that road. 3rd Corps moves via the Ashbey's Gap Pike over the mountains and advances to the east. After marching back across the Potomac, 2nd Corps reunites with regiments left behind at Winchester and moves east. It brings up the rear of the army, traveling over Snicker's Gap on the pike, and then continuing along the pike to the east and destiny. THE NORTH: The army began its long march to northern Maryland on June 21st. By the 23rd cavalry screening this move confirmed rumors that the rebel infantry had vanished from the north side of the Potomac. The Union cavalry elements still south of the Potomac screening the west and south of the army reported an increase in the rebel presence there. The army begins backtracking on the morning of the 24th. The cavalry south of the Potomac is spread out covering a huge arc of territory. By that afternoon the increased presence has turned into masses of Confederate horse. By the afternoon of June 24th 6th Corps - the only army corps still south of the river when the order to countermarch arrived is getting back in line to continue the move south from Leesburg. The 1st, 3rd, and 11th Corps of the army, followed by the rest of the army's cavalry move to rejoin the army. The crossing at Edward's Ferry is packed, the crossing is confused and delays may occur in the arrival of these forces on the 25th. Army command seems to be seized by inertia and is delayed in responding to the field, along with the guns of the Artillery Reserve. Also on the 25th the army is joined by elements from the defenses of Washington. 2nd, 5th, and 12th Corps, after a brutal countermarch and delays due to chaos at the river crossing, begin arriving during the evening of the 26th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 100_136.scn, 100_40.scn, 100_38.scn, 100_256.scn, 100_119.scn

101. Entrenched along Pipe Creek IV (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the left flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps in the Manchester area - the extreme right of the Union line - turning the Union position there, and rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps is deployed in a line of battle two divisions wide. The following corps will be released for the fight early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 101_11.scn, 101_17.scn, 101_5.scn, 101_15.scn, 101_4.scn

102. Skirmish near Gettysburg (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: Early's division of 2nd Corps crosses the mountains on June 26th and moves through Gettysburg on its way east. Late in the day Union cavalry makes contact with the division. Gordon's brigade has already moved on from Gettysburg and must backtrack to the action. Gordon is delayed in responding to the fight to his rear. THE NORTH: Buford's cavalry division moves up from Emmitsburg and encounters Confederate horse south of town. The division is somewhat strung out and takes some time to arrive.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 102_7.scn, 102_1.scn, 102_4.scn, 102_2.scn, 102_9.scn

103. The Crisis is at Hand I (var. 5)
THE NORTH: The army advances north screened by the full Cavalry Corps. The move from Virginia has been long and arduous. As the cavalry probes north, 6th and 5th Corps, the lead elements of the main body, follow, moving up the pike from Westminster. The rest of the army follows, advancing through Westminster. Despite the best efforts of the army some straggling has occurred and the main body is somewhat strung out as it moves north. THE SOUTH: The army has been converging on Gettysburg with some elements moving that direction as early as June 27th. By the 29th 2nd Corps is based around the town, screened by the cavalry division - the last elements of which arrived after dark on the 28th. By the afternoon of the 29th 1st and 3rd Corps are nearing Gettysburg, marching from Chambersburg. None too soon it would appear, as the past few days of skirmishing with Union cavalry is forgotten with the appearance of long columns of blue clad infantry. The two corps are concentrated but have not made as good time as the command hoped for.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 103_13.scn, 103_12.scn, 103_24.scn, 103_15.scn, 103_21.scn

104. The Crisis is at Hand II (var. 13)
THE NORTH: The army advances north screened by the full Cavalry Corps. The move from Virginia has been long and arduous. As the cavalry probes north, 6th and 5th Corps, the lead elements of the main body, follow, moving up the pike from Westminster. The rest of the army follows. Half the force advances via Westminster, while the other half moves east toward Taneytown before moving north. Despite the best efforts of the army some straggling has occurred and the main body is somewhat strung out as it moves north. THE SOUTH: The army has been converging on Gettysburg with some elements moving that direction as early as June 27th. By the 29th 2nd Corps is based around the town, screened by the cavalry division - the last elements of which arrived after dark on the 28th. By the afternoon of the 29th 1st and 3rd Corps are nearing Gettysburg, marching via Fairfield. None too soon it would appear, as the past few days of skirmishing with Union cavalry is forgotten with the appearance of long columns of blue clad infantry. The two corps are concentrated and have made good time.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 104_24.scn, 104_22.scn, 104_13.scn, 104_23.scn, 104_7.scn

105. Entrenched along Pipe Creek II (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the left flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps in the Manchester area - the extreme right of the Union line - turning the Union position there, and rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps is deployed in a line of battle one division wide. The best laid plans can go awry and they do at this time, as the release of the following corps is substantially delayed. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 105_2.scn, 105_7.scn, 105_19.scn, 105_9.scn, 105_24.scn

106. Attack from the west VI (var. 85)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having moved along the pike from Hagerstown, nearing the Union position east of Taneytown. 2nd Corps follows 1st Corps in a seemingly endless stream of butternut. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. The corps commander takes a fall from his horse as the advance is preparing to move out. It may take considerable time to recover from his fall, potentially delaying the arrival of the corps until later than early afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. Washington has different information on the axis of the Confederate advance, and demands that army command not release the reserve corps, posted behind the right flank, until the location of the Confederate advance is confirmed. This meddling is compounded by lost messages and the reserves may not be released until late morning on July 5th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 106_51.scn, 106_135.scn, 106_17.scn, 106_67.scn, 106_88.scn

107. Entrenched along Pipe Creek V (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps along the Westminster Pike, driving through that town, and splitting the Union line in half. From there it is on to Washington. Second Corps deploys with two divisions forward to start the attack. The two following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 107_6.scn, 107_23.scn, 107_20.scn, 107_21.scn, 107_22.scn

108. Entrenched along Pipe Creek III (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the left flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps in the Manchester area - the extreme right of the Union line - turning the Union position there, and rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps is deployed in a line of battle one division wide. The release of the following corps are delayed until mid morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 108_4.scn, 108_27.scn, 108_20.scn, 108_7.scn, 108_26.scn

109. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVII (var. 26)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the one corps along the Westminster Pike while the main advance moves along the axis of Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with three divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be unavailable to assist the attack until early in the afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 109_20.scn, 109_22.scn, 109_23.scn, 109_19.scn, 109_5.scn

110. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIX (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the one corps along the Westminster Pike while the main advance moves along the axis of Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be unavailable to assist the attack until early in the afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 110_27.scn, 110_16.scn, 110_8.scn, 110_6.scn, 110_11.scn

111. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XX (var. 14)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the two corps along the Westminster Pike while supporting this advance with an attack along the pike from Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 111_11.scn, 111_6.scn, 111_13.scn, 111_19.scn, 111_10.scn

112. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXI (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the two corps along the Westminster Pike while supporting this advance with an attack along the pike from Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 112_6.scn, 112_26.scn, 112_19.scn, 112_18.scn, 112_24.scn

113. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXII (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the two corps along the Westminster Pike while supporting this advance with an attack along the pike from Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with one division forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 113_25.scn, 113_15.scn, 113_24.scn, 113_17.scn, 113_19.scn

114. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXIV (var. 8)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south is accomplished along 3 supporting routes - via Taneytown, along the Westminster Pike, and using the Manchester road. The intent is to apply force all along the Union line at once. The corps each deploy with three divisions forward to start the attack. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 114_9.scn, 114_7.scn, 114_6.scn, 114_8.scn, 114_3.scn

115. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXV (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south is accomplished along 3 supporting routes - via Taneytown, along the Westminster Pike, and using the Manchester road. The intent is to apply force all along the Union line at once. The corps each deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 115_6.scn, 115_1.scn, 115_2.scn, 115_4.scn, 115_7.scn

116. Attack from the east III (var. 152)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps moves along a parallel route to 1st Corps, arriving south of the road to York at daybreak. 3rd Corps moves even further south than 2nd Corps planning to arrive near Snydersburg mid morning on July 5th. The road net is unfamiliar, and there is a real chance of significant delays in the corps' arrival. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. The two reserve corps are already positioned on the right flank. 12th Corps is ordered forward to reinforce 6th Corps, while 2nd Corps remains in reserve.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 116_155.scn, 116_161.scn, 116_198.scn, 116_35.scn, 116_15.scn

117. Defense of the Gaps (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: 1st Corps moves north and takes up forward positions at the various passages of the Bull Run Mountains. Cavalry screens the flanks of the infantry. The force's orders are to hold until nightfall of June 18th and then move westward into the Valley. Jones' cavalry brigade, which had been tasked with screening the movement along the Rappahannock, is delayed along the river and doesn't arrive until the afternoon of June 18th. 1st Corps is deployed with all three divisions forward. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac has shifted north to the vicinity of Manassas. On the 16th orders go out to the Cavalry Corps to aggressively push to the west to both cover a shift of the army in that direction and determine, if possible, the disposition of the rebel army. The morning of the 17th finds the cavalry moving out from Manassas. The goal is to force the pass at Aldie and push west to develop the situation. 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Cavalry Division leads the advance. 5th Corps moves forward to Gum Springs on the 17th and advances in support of the cavalry in the morning of the 18th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 117_18.scn, 117_33.scn, 117_2.scn, 117_21.scn, 117_38.scn

118. Festung Potomac (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The plan calls for a defense in depth, thoroughly entrenching the army in three lines. The first line is along Antietam Creek; the second on the high ground to the rear of Hagerstown; and the third on strong terrain covering the bridge at Falling Waters. By the evening of July 8th the work is completed. A good thing it is as the Union army begins to make its presence felt at that time. Yankee cavalry backed by strong infantry support begins arriving in the area from several directions late that afternoon. By the morning of the 9th masses of infantry are appearing. Do or die time has come for the Army of Northern Virginia. THE NORTH: The Army of the Potomac shifts west as fast as possible while still maintaining its cohesion. Intelligence puts the Confederate army in force along Antietam Creek In the late afternoon of July 8th cavalry with strong infantry support crosses South Mountain at three places. The remainder of the army advances employing the central route exclusively. By late morning the majority of the army will be west of the mountains and ready to give the rebel force what for. High chance of reinforcements arriving on time.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 118_4.scn, 118_2.scn, 118_9.scn, 118_11.scn, 118_12.scn

119. Shift east and north (var. 3)
THE NORTH: The evening of June 23rd finds the Union army in transit to Frederick, Maryland when intelligence arrives indicating that the rebel army has crossed the mountains and is moving on Westminster. The army is ordered to shift east to cover Washington, and then to advance north. This move is led by one division of cavalry which, by the afternoon of June 25th is pushing towards the last known rebel position near Westminster. The second division of Union cavalry must still screen the rest of the army's crossing of the Potomac, and move north. Consequently it doesn't arrive on the field until the morning of June 27th. The government is so concerned for the security of the capitol that it refuses to permit the release of any of the troops from the Department of Washington to the field army. The main body of the Union army is in transit to Frederick when word arrives of the Confederate presence east of the mountains. Major elements of the army are still south of the Potomac. The force is shifted east and north. Hard marching and good staff work get the lead infantry elements in the area of operations at the same time as the cavalry. Even making good time can't compensate for the length some units must travel, and it is June 27th before the entire army is present. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps moves out from Hagerstown on June 21st. It crosses the mountain on the pike unopposed, but observed. Moving behind Jenkins' and Imboden's cavalry brigades the corps advances through Emmitsburg and Taneytown, reaching Westminster in the afternoon of June 24th. The corps pushes south on the 25th before encountering anything more than token resistance. 1st and 3rd Corps move rapidly to Winchester, then turn north without pause. They cross the Potomac on June 23rd and move north to Hagerstown. The march has been hard and the corps tarry near Hagerstown, getting a late start on June 24th on the move east over the mountains. The afternoon of June 25th finds the head the column just clearing the end of the passage and moving towards Emmitsburg. The Cavalry Division covers the shift of the army from northern Virginia, and then follows suit. The majority of the division moves via Winchester, crossing the Potomac immediately after 1st and 3rd Corps. This force then takes a more southerly route over the mountains via Mechanicstown, screening the advance of the infantry and arriving in the theater of operations in the afternoon of June 25th. Two brigades of the cavalry cover the entire movement before heading north, and, after following the same route as the rest of the division, arrive on June 28th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 119_88.scn, 119_68.scn, 119_28.scn, 119_64.scn, 119_62.scn

120. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VII (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps along the Westminster Pike, driving through that town, and splitting the Union line in half. From there it is on to Washington. Second Corps deploys with one division forward to start the attack. The two following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 120_15.scn, 120_17.scn, 120_18.scn, 120_14.scn, 120_27.scn

121. Entrenched along Pipe Creek IX (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the right flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with all three corps on the axis Taneytown - Westminster - the left of the Union line. This plan aims at turning the Union position there, and rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps will attack along a one division front. The following corps will be available for use during the morning hours. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 121_19.scn, 121_15.scn, 121_7.scn, 121_25.scn, 121_26.scn

122. Entrenched along Pipe Creek X (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the right flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with all three corps on the axis Taneytown - Westminster - the left of the Union line. This plan aims at turning the Union position there, and rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps will attack along a one division front. The following corps will be available for use during the morning hours. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 122_4.scn, 122_19.scn, 122_21.scn, 122_1.scn, 122_6.scn

123. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VIII (var. 9)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been by the right flank. The cavalry division screens the flanks of this advance. The plan is to attack with all three corps on the axis Taneytown - Westminster - the left of the Union line. This plan aims to turn the Union position there, rolling it up and away from Washington. The lead corps will attack along a three division front. The following corps suffer from an amazing confusion of orders and are significantly delayed in supporting the attack. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 123_10.scn, 123_17.scn, 123_3.scn, 123_2.scn, 123_1.scn

124. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XI (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps towards Manchester, supported by one corps attacking along the Westminster Pike. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with one division forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 124_27.scn, 124_17.scn, 124_26.scn, 124_19.scn, 124_21.scn

125. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XII (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps towards Manchester, supported by one corps attacking along the Westminster Pike. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with one division forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 125_20.scn, 125_7.scn, 125_13.scn, 125_10.scn, 125_19.scn

126. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIII (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps towards Manchester, supported by one corps attacking along the Westminster Pike. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 126_10.scn, 126_22.scn, 126_6.scn, 126_19.scn, 126_15.scn

127. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIV (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps along the Westminster Pike, supported by one corps attacking towards Manchester. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be unavailable to assist the attack until early in the afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 127_3.scn, 127_9.scn, 127_18.scn, 127_26.scn, 127_10.scn

128. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XV (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps along the Westminster Pike, supported by one corps attacking towards Manchester. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with two divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 128_9.scn, 128_14.scn, 128_26.scn, 128_24.scn, 128_12.scn

129. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVI (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and the road to Manchester with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with two corps along the Westminster Pike, supported by one corps attacking towards Manchester. The aim is to crush the Union right and right center, and roll up the Union line. From there it is on to Washington. The lead corps each deploy with three divisions forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack later in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the right of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 129_26.scn, 129_16.scn, 129_27.scn, 129_2.scn, 129_7.scn

130. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVIII (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster and via Taneytown with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the one corps along the Westminster Pike while the main advance moves along the axis of Westminster to Taneytown. Crush the left and left center of the Union line, and roll through Westminster to Washington sums the goal up. The lead corps deploy with one division forward to start the attack. The following corps will be available to assist the attack early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves are inexplicably delayed in responding to the Confederate presence. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 130_19.scn, 130_8.scn, 130_13.scn, 130_12.scn, 130_15.scn

131. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXIII (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south is accomplished along 3 supporting routes - via Taneytown, along the Westminster Pike, and using the Manchester road. The intent is to apply force all along the Union line at once. The corps each deploy with one division forward to start the attack. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the left of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 131_4.scn, 131_6.scn, 131_7.scn, 131_3.scn, 131_5.scn

132. Attack from the east I (var. 228)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps moves along a parallel route to 1st Corps, arriving south of the road to York at daybreak. 3rd Corps moves even further north than 2nd Corps, and arrives north of Dug Hill Ridge early on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. Washington has different information on the axis of the Confederate advance, and demands that army command not release the reserve corps, posted behind the left flank, until the location of the Confederate advance is confirmed. Despite this meddling army command orders the reserves to move early in the morning of July 5th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 132_81.scn, 132_185.scn, 132_208.scn, 132_226.scn, 132_173.scn

133. Attack from the west II (var. 85)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having moved via Mechanicstown, crossing the Monocacy at Miller's Bridge. 3rd Corps moves along the pike from Hagerstown. The corps got a late start on July 4th and, consequently lags in its advance, with the van only approaching the Monocacy as dawn breaks. 2nd Corps follows 3rd Corps' advance along the northern approach to the Union position, arriving on the map as day breaks on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. The two reserve corps, stationed behind the center of the line, are held in place awaiting developments. Incredibly the reserves are not released until late in the morning of the 5th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 133_97.scn, 133_151.scn, 133_125.scn, 133_68.scn, 133_4.scn

134. Attack from the east II (var. 120)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps follows 1st Corps. The march has been grueling and the corps may experience significant delay in arriving on the field. 3rd Corps moves even further south than 2nd Corps, and arrives near Snydersburg mid morning on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. The army's command seems stunned by the development, and still suspects an advance from the north. The two reserve corps, stationed behind the center of the line, are held in place awaiting developments. Incredibly the reserves are not released until late in the morning of the 5th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 134_269.scn, 134_67.scn, 134_251.scn, 134_280.scn, 134_35.scn

135. Attack from the west I (var. 17)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having moved via Mechanicstown, crossing the Monocacy at Miller's Bridge. 2nd Corps follow 1st Corps in a seemingly endless stream of butternut. 2nd Corps inexplicably dawdles along the route and may arrive substantially later than its anticipated arrival time of mid morning on July 5th. 3rd Corps, having moved along the pike from Hagerstown, nears the Union position east of Taneytown. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. The reserve of the army is stationed behind the left of the defensive line. This force is committed, extending the line along Beaver Dam Creek early on July 4th. By the morning of the 5th the new line is well entrenched.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 135_91.scn, 135_54.scn, 135_83.scn, 135_26.scn, 135_84.scn

136. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VI (var. 20)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. Evidently the Yankee army can't be lured into offense, so the southern army must make the move. The army moves south in a well controlled fashion. The move south has been along the pike to Westminster with the cavalry division screening the flanks of the advance. The plan is to attack with the all three corps along the Westminster Pike, driving through that town, and splitting the Union line in half. From there it is on to Washington. Second Corps deploys with all three divisions forward to start the attack. The two following corps will be available to assist the attack early in the morning. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. These reserves are available early in the day. The command gambles on a Confederate advance on the center of the line and deploys the reserves near this area. These reserves may be delayed in their release. One division of the Cavalry Corps is in reserve, while the other two cover the flanks of the army. All day on July 2nd word filters in of a southern advance culminating with rebel forces being spotted by the main body of the army late in the day. Dawn on July 3rd sees the beginning of a massive struggle.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 136_9.scn, 136_16.scn, 136_3.scn, 136_13.scn, 136_15.scn

137. Attack from the west III (var. 172)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having moved via Mechanicstown, crossing the Monocacy at Miller's Bridge. 2nd and 3rd Corps follow 1st Corps in a seemingly endless stream of butternut. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. The two reserve corps, stationed on the left of the line, are ordered to the right flank. The messengers carrying these orders get lost on their way east, and it is not until after nightfall on July 4th that the corps get under way. By the morning of the 5th the reserve corps are just reaching the main route west.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 137_109.scn, 137_16.scn, 137_110.scn, 137_150.scn, 137_128.scn

138. Block the advance (var. 115)
THE NORTH: News of the rebel advance east of the mountains brings a fast response from the Army of the Potomac. One division of cavalry is shifted north late on June 23rd, and by the afternoon of June 25th is pushing towards the last known rebel position near Westminster. The horse will need to hold the rebel advance until the main body of the army can make its way north. The second division of Union cavalry must still screen the rest of the army's crossing of the Potomac, and move north. The traffic snarls are incredible and the division doesn't arrive on the field until the night of June 27th. The government is so concerned for the security of the capitol that it refuses to permit the release of any of the troops from the Department of Washington to the field army. The main body of the army moves out on June 24th. The roads are incredibly congested as tens of thousands of men move north, but the force makes good time. The scare to the government is so bad that the entire army is routed through Washington. It begins arriving on the field during the afternoon of June 26th. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps moves out from Hagerstown on June 21st. It crosses the mountain on the pike unopposed, but observed. Moving behind Jenkins' and Imboden's cavalry brigades the corps advances through Emmitsburg and Taneytown, reaching Westminster in the afternoon of June 24th. The corps pushes south on the 25th before encountering anything more than token resistance. 1st and 3rd Corps move rapidly to Winchester, then turn north without pause. They cross the Potomac on June 23rd and move north to Hagerstown. On the 24th they move across the mountains on the pike. They make good time and by the afternoon of June 25th the head of a seemingly endless column of troops is moving through Taneytown. The Cavalry Division covers the shift of the army from northern Virginia, and then follows suit. The majority of the division moves via Winchester, crossing the Potomac immediately after 1st and 3rd Corps. This force then takes a more southerly route over the mountains via Mechanicstown, screening the advance of the infantry and arriving in the theater of operations in the afternoon of June 25th. Two brigades of the cavalry cover the entire movement before heading north, and, after following the same route as the rest of the division, arrive on June 28th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 138_157.scn, 138_87.scn, 138_182.scn, 138_114.scn, 138_159.scn

139. Attack from the east IV (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps moves along a parallel route to 1st Corps, arriving north of the road to York at daybreak. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. 3rd Corps gets off to a sluggish start, however, and doesn't begin arriving early afternoon on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. The two reserve corps, stationed on the left of the line, are ordered to the right flank. The orders are clear and the commanders act on them expeditiously. By dawn on the 5th the corps are moving through Westminster on their way to the right flank.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 139_36.scn, 139_27.scn, 139_54.scn, 139_93.scn, 139_7.scn

140. Attack from the east V (var. 91)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps follows hot on the heels of 1st Corps, arriving in mid morning. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. 3rd Corps begins arriving mid morning on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. Also on the 4th the two reserve corps, stationed behind the center of the line, are ordered to the right flank. The orders are clear and the commanders act on them expeditiously. By dawn on the 5th the corps are on the right flank.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 140_52.scn, 140_55.scn, 140_77.scn, 140_12.scn, 140_120.scn

141. Attack from the east VI (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union right. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jenkins' brigade detects the northern forces to its front falling back, evidently in response to the Confederate turning movement. Jenkins advances and occupies Manchester, feeling out the new Union position. Imboden's brigade, which has been screening the Confederate advance and skirmishing with Union cavalry for days, pushes west south of Manchester. 1st Corps leads the Confederate advance, moving through Manchester in the early morning hours. 2nd Corps moves along a route parallel to and north of that taken by 1st Corps. The corps is scheduled to arrive mid morning of July 5th. The territory is completely unknown to the commanders, and the march has been exhausting. There is a real chance that the corps' arrival may be significantly delayed. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. The corps commander takes a fall from his horse as the advance is preparing to move out. It may take considerable time to recover from his fall, potentially delaying the arrival of the corps until later than early afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies right rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. 6th Corps is bent back on itself, abandoning Manchester. Late on July 4th Gregg's cavalry division falls back before Confederate horse south of Manchester. The two reserve corps are already positioned on the right flank. 12th Corps is ordered forward to reinforce 6th Corps, while 2nd Corps remains in reserve.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 141_61.scn, 141_64.scn, 141_37.scn, 141_46.scn, 141_72.scn

142. Attack from the west IV (var. 38)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having advanced via Creagerstown, at a strategic intersection on Coppermine Road. 2nd Corps follows 1st Corps but has had trouble in keeping pace with 1st Corps blistering march. Complications along the final leg of the approach may mean substantial delays beyond the anticipated mid morning arrival times for this corps. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. 3rd Corps gets off to a sluggish start, however, and doesn't begin arriving early afternoon on July 5th. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. The reserve of the army is stationed behind the left of the defensive line. This force is committed, extending the line along Beaver Dam Creek early on July 4th. By the morning of the 5th the new line is well entrenched.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 142_57.scn, 142_41.scn, 142_9.scn, 142_2.scn, 142_3.scn

143. Attack from the west V (var. 67)
THE SOUTH: The cavalry fight of the 29th reveals that the Union intends to fight along the line of Big Pipe Creek. The army is sent on an epic march in an effort to envelop the Union left. The cavalry division screens the Union army as this march is made. On July 4th Jones' brigade advances in the lead of the Confederate infantry, skirmishing with Union cavalry. The southern army moves west of the mountains and south. The army then turns east and advances on the Union defensive position, hoping to envelop its left flank. Dawn on July 5th finds 1st Corps, having advanced via Creagerstown, at a strategic intersection on Coppermine Road. 2nd Corps follows 1st Corps but has had trouble in keeping pace with 1st Corps blistering march. Complications along the final leg of the approach may mean substantial delays beyond the anticipated mid morning arrival times for this corps. 3rd Corps is held south of Two Taverns. It is to move south on the 5th and advance down the Pike on Westminster. If enough of the Union army reacts to the attack from the west, 3rd Corps should be able to fall on their flank with devastating effect. The corps commander takes a fall from his horse as the advance is preparing to move out. It may take considerable time to recover from his fall, potentially delaying the arrival of the corps until later than early afternoon. THE NORTH: The Union army has dug in along the defensive line of Big Pipe Creek. In the time that has passed since arriving there the position has been improved and is three levels deep at places along the line - a formidable barrier. Five Corps are deployed forward, and two are held in reserve. Days pass and all the army encounters is an impenetrable cavalry screen. Late on July 3rd word is finally received that there are large bodies of rebel troops moving to envelop the armies left rear. The problem is that there is no assurance that this force will not be operating in conjunction with an attack elsewhere. The cavalry screen falls back before the Confederate advance, and 1st Corps shifts its reserve division to extend the defensive line south along Little Pipe Creek. The reserve of the army is stationed behind the center of the defensive line. This force is ordered to the left, but fails to move until late on July 4th. Dawn on July 5th finds it still on the road to the left flank.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 143_86.scn, 143_99.scn, 143_60.scn, 143_77.scn, 143_96.scn

144. South of Gettysburg III (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. The army takes up a position south of Gettysburg, and improves it over the next few days. On July 2nd, just as the command is giving up hope of luring the Union army north, the Yanks appear and the fight is on. THE NORTH: The army shifts north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Taneytown road, via Westminster, and north from Manchester. The advance is by the center, with five corps taking that route, with one corps each on the left and the right. The advance finds positions well south of Gettysburg occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 144_1.scn, 144_2.scn, 144_3.scn, 144_4.scn

145. South of Gettysburg IV (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. The army takes up a position south of Gettysburg, and improves it over the next few days. On July 2nd, just as the command is giving up hope of luring the Union army north, the Yanks appear and the fight is on. THE NORTH: The army shifts north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Taneytown road, via Westminster, and north from Manchester The advance is by the right flank, with five corps taking that route, with one corps each on the left and in the center. The advance finds positions well south of Gettysburg occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength. The routes are congested and the march north a shambles. There is a high likelihood of delay in the arrival of reinforcements.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 145_1.scn, 145_2.scn, 145_3.scn, 145_4.scn

146. South of Gettysburg I (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. The army takes up a position south of Gettysburg, and improves it over the next few days. On July 2nd, just as the command is giving up hope of luring the Union army north, the Yanks appear and the fight is on. THE NORTH: The army shifts north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Taneytown road, via Westminster, and north from Manchester. The advance finds positions well south of Gettysburg occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 146_1.scn, 146_2.scn, 146_3.scn, 146_4.scn

147. South of Gettysburg II (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: On June 28th the army begins crossing the mountains. The army takes up a position south of Gettysburg, and improves it over the next few days. On July 2nd, just as the command is giving up hope of luring the Union army north, the Yanks appear and the fight is on. THE NORTH: The army shifts north from Frederick, Maryland on June 30th. The Cavalry Corps leads the advance which is made in three columns along the Taneytown road, via Westminster, and north from Manchester. The advance is by the left flank, with five corps taking that route, with one corps each in the center and on the right. The advance finds positions well south of Gettysburg occupied by the Confederate army which is present in strength. The routes are congested and the march north a sorry affair. There is a moderate likelihood of delay in the arrival of reinforcements.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 147_1.scn, 147_2.scn, 147_3.scn, 147_4.scn

148. By the right flank (var. 3)
THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The last of the Confederate army has left the vicinity of Fredericksburg, and 6th Corps is sent north to cover the western approaches to Washington. 2nd Corps has also been sent north for this purpose. The army will cross the Rappahannock at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Lawson's Ford, aiming to turn the left of any Confederate forces along the river. One corps will demonstrate at Rappahannock Station in an effort to pin any rebel forces in that area. 12th Corps, the last of the forces to shift upstream, took a wrong turn during its march yesterday, and is out of position south of Warrenton. 5th Corps, tasked to demonstrate near Rappahannock Station, experiences unanticipated problems and may be delayed. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved to the Valley. 1st Corps has deployed near Culpeper providing a loose cover for the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 148_4.scn, 148_12.scn, 148_1.scn, 148_14.scn, 148_15.scn

149. On a collision course I (var. 34)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 149_33.scn, 149_15.scn, 149_35.scn, 149_20.scn, 149_19.scn

150. Attack on a broad front (var. 2)
THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The last of the Confederate army has left the vicinity of Fredericksburg, and 6th Corps is sent north to cover the western approaches to Washington. 12th Corps has also been sent north for this purpose. The army will advance along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper and continue on this axis to the Rapidan. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved to the Valley. 1st Corps has deployed forward along the Rappahannock while covering the massing of the rest of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. Heth is delayed, arriving in the late afternoon of the 15th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 150_8.scn, 150_5.scn, 150_10.scn, 150_9.scn, 150_11.scn

151. Envelopment on the Rappahannock (var. 8)
THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The last of the Confederate army has left the vicinity of Fredericksburg, and 6th Corps is sent north to cover the western approaches to Washington. 3rd Corps has also been sent north for this purpose. The army is to attempt an envelopment of the Confederate lines via Waterloo Bridge and points further north. Other elements of the army will demonstrate near Rappahannock Station, and cross the river south of the main effort to provide a link with the enveloping force. 12th Corps, the last of the forces to shift upstream, took a wrong turn during its march yesterday, and is out of position south of Warrenton. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved to the Valley. 1st Corps has deployed near Culpeper providing a loose cover for the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. Heth is delayed, arriving in the late afternoon of the 15th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 151_13.scn, 151_9.scn, 151_1.scn, 151_4.scn, 151_8.scn

152. South of Kelly's Ford (var. 5)
THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The last of the Confederate army has left the vicinity of Fredericksburg, and 6th Corps is sent north to cover the western approaches to Washington. 12th Corps has also been sent north for this purpose. The army will advance south of Kelly's Ford and attempt to get between any rebel forces that have made their way upstream and their supply source. One corps will demonstrate along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to pin any Confederate forces that are present in that region. THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved to the Valley. 1st Corps has deployed forward along the Rappahannock while covering the massing of the rest of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 152_15.scn, 152_5.scn, 152_6.scn, 152_11.scn, 152_12.scn

153. The mountain line II (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 3rd Corps of the army move north from the Rappahannock on June 17th. The plan is to link up on June 19th with 2nd Corps which has been recalled from the Valley. There has been skirmishing with Union cavalry which has patrolled west of the mountains, but the cavalry has been able to contain the Union horse. 1st and 3rd Corps have moved north skirting the Bull Run mountains well to the west. 1st Corps is massed east of Upperville on the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. 3rd Corps has assembled near Salem on the road to White Plains and Thoroughfare Gap. 2nd Corps has moved east from the Valley and is assembled just on the west side of Snicker's Gap. On the afternoon of June 20th these forces move forward to strike the Union army from the west. THE NORTH: The army has made the move north from the Rappahannock. Army command gambling on an attack being made from the south. Cavalry screens the Bull Run mountains. The mass of the army guards against an approach along the line of the Orange and Alexandria railroad east of the mountains. Five corps are deployed forward with two in reserve along the Warrenton Turnpike. Army command has strict orders in effect mandating that the reserves not be immediately released.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 153_14.scn, 153_11.scn, 153_19.scn, 153_17.scn, 153_6.scn

154. The move north (var. 37)
THE SOUTH: 1st Corps is poised to execute a deep envelopment of the Rappahannock line leading the rest of the army north to the Valley. It will cross at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. 3rd Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a central cavalry reserve. Four corps are present. 2nd Corps is due today and will be used to extend the infantry screen as far north as Lawson's Ford. 2nd Corps has already started shifting upstream. It arrives during the early afternoon of the 15th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 154_31.scn, 154_41.scn, 154_46.scn, 154_42.scn, 154_5.scn
155. Link up with 2nd Corps (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: 1st Corps and 3rd Corps are prepared to move north, intending to link up with 2nd Corps west of the Bull Run mountains and strike at Manassas. Early on June 17th 1st Corps moves out intending to cross the Rappahannock at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is to follow. 3rd Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 155_8.scn, 155_3.scn, 155_5.scn, 155_2.scn, 155_4.scn

156. The attack from the west (var. 122)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 3rd Corps of the army move north from the Rappahannock on June 17th. The plan is to link up on June 19th with 2nd Corps which has been recalled from the Valley. There has been skirmishing with Union cavalry which has patrolled west of the mountains, but the cavalry has been able to contain the Union horse. 1st and 3rd Corps have moved north skirting the Bull Run mountains well to the west. 1st Corps has massed east of Upperville on the turnpike through Ashby's Gap where it is joined on June 19th by 2nd Corps which has moved east from the Valley. 3rd Corps is assembled near Salem on the road to White Plains and Thoroughfare Gap. On the morning of June 20th these forces move forward to strike the Union army from the west. THE NORTH: The army began shifting north from the Rappahannock on June 15th. By the 19th it is spread over a wide range of territory, mostly east of the Bull Run mountains. Cavalry has pushed west of the range, supported by 5th Corps. The only resistance has taken the form of skirmishes with Confederate cavalry. This changes on June 20th when rebel infantry appears in strength. The alarm goes out to the rest of the army from the advance elements. 3rd Corps, located around Gum Spring, reacts at the first news of combat. When a dispatch arrives from 5th Corps indicating that the Confederates are present in force, the 1st Corps' commander waits on orders from army command. When these still aren't received by late morning he orders the corps to move out from its camp at Guilford Station on his own initiative. 11th Corps, camped near Cow Horn Ford, gets wind of the events to the south in mid morning. After forwarding his news to army command, the 11th Corps commander immediately sends the news on to his counterpart in 12th Corps, which is located to the north near Leesburg. After waiting several hours and still receiving no orders from the army command, the corps commander reacts on his own. 12th Corps holds its position at Leesburg until orders arrive from army command directing it south. It is late afternoon by then, and, rather than moving north of Goose Creek, the corps moves east on the Leesburg pike and crosses Goose Creek before turning south. 6th Corps, the southern hinge of the defensive line learns of events to the north about noon on June 20th. Communications with army command seem to be out, and the corps commander elects to move north immediately, traveling from Germantown via Warrenton en route to New Baltimore. By early morning on June 21st it nears its destination. Army headquarters receives reports from a variety of sources regarding the Confederate movement. By noon on June 20th it has formulated a response, and moves west from Fairfax Courthouse, calling up 2nd Corps from its encampment at Sangster's Station. 2nd Corps is involved tracking down rumors of rebels near it, and doesn't get moving until later in the afternoon. Stahel's cavalry division has been loaned to the Army of the Potomac from the defenses of Washington. While it was supposed to be engaged in patrolling activity in support of the army, Army command manages to pry it loose from the nervous politicians, and it moves west from Fairfax Courthouse late in the afternoon of June 20th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 156_180.scn, 156_22.scn, 156_89.scn, 156_117.scn, 156_80.scn

157. The attack from the west and south I (var. 56)
THE SOUTH: The Cavalry Division shifts north skirting the western edge of the Bull Run mountains. It skirmishes with Union horse while covering the advance of 2nd Corps from the Valley. 2nd Corps has made good time from the Valley, and is advancing down the Snicker's Gap pike just behind the cavalry screen. 1st Corps has advanced west of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and has just passed through Greenwich as day breaks. 3rd Corps has advanced along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, turning away from the railroad at Bristoe Station, and advancing on Gainesville. THE NORTH: The command gambles that an attack will be made towards Manassas from the west. The army makes a forward defense. Three corps are deployed west of the mountains covering the approaches to the gaps in the range. The other corps are held in a reserve to the east of the range, ready to react to where the heat is highest. Cavalry covers the flanks of the army and gaps in the defense. Through a meteorological/acoustical fluke the sounds of the battle to the west of the mountains can't be heard on the east side. Messages are slow to arrive, and it is not till night that the reserves are released. Stahel's cavalry division has been released from the defenses of Washington and is moving south to screen the army's southern flank.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 157_7.scn, 157_203.scn, 157_205.scn, 157_198.scn, 157_3.scn

158. The attack from the west and south II (var. 20)
THE SOUTH: The Cavalry Division shifts north skirting the western edge of the Bull Run mountains. It skirmishes with Union horse while covering the advance of 2nd Corps from the Valley. 2nd Corps got snarled in its march by poor staff work. It's not until the afternoon of June 20th that it arrives in the area. It advances down the Ashby's Gap pike. 1st Corps has advanced along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad leaving the line at Bristoe Station to advance on Gainesville. The lead elements of the corps have just crossed Broad Run as day breaks. 3rd Corps has advanced along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, turning away from the railroad at Bristoe Station, and advancing on Gainesville. THE NORTH: The army has made the move north from the Rappahannock. Army command gambling on an attack being made from the south. Cavalry screens the Bull Run mountains. The mass of the army guards against an approach along the line of the Orange and Alexandria railroad east of the mountains. Five corps are deployed forward with two in reserve along the Warrenton Turnpike. Army command has strict orders in effect mandating that the reserves not be immediately released.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 158_205.scn, 158_176.scn, 158_206.scn, 158_116.scn, 158_11.scn

159. Assault on Bull Run (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: June 20th involved assessing the situation and choosing a focus for the attack. After evaluating the available intelligence army command settles on a plan calling for all three corps of the army to attack the north flank of the Union position. Drive down the Leesburg pike and the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad. Cavalry screens the southern flank. THE NORTH: The army is deployed in a wide arc defending the line of the Bull Run from Union Mills north. All corps are deployed forward. The cavalry corps defends the northern approach to Washington along Broad Run, covering the Leesburg pike.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 159_6.scn, 159_9.scn, 159_10.scn, 159_11.scn, 159_3.scn

160. The mountain line I (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 3rd Corps of the army move north from the Rappahannock on June 17th. The plan is to link up on June 19th with 2nd Corps which has been recalled from the Valley. There has been skirmishing with Union cavalry which has patrolled west of the mountains, but the cavalry has been able to contain the Union horse. 1st and 3rd Corps have moved north skirting the Bull Run mountains well to the west. They have assembled near Salem on the road to White Plains and Thoroughfare Gap. 2nd Corps has moved east from the Valley and is assembled just on the west side of Snicker's Gap. On the afternoon of June 20th these forces move forward to strike the Union army from the west. THE NORTH: The command gambles that an attack will be made towards Manassas from the west. The army makes a forward defense. Three corps are deployed west of the mountains covering the approaches to the gaps in the range. The other corps are held in a reserve to the east of the range, ready to react to where the heat is highest. Cavalry covers the flanks of the army and gaps in the defense. No plan survives contact with the enemy, and this plan is no exception. Army command gets a case of the jitters, and delays the release of the reserves. Stahel's cavalry division has been released from the defenses of Washington and is moving south to screen the army's southern flank.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 160_4.scn, 160_15.scn, 160_9.scn, 160_8.scn, 160_3.scn

161. Trouble on the way north III (var. 95)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps move out to transit to the Valley on the evening of June 14th. 3rd Corps begins to move north June 15th to carry out its covering role. The move is barely underway before it runs into trouble in the form of strong Union resistance. Heth's division is ordered to hurry forward, and 1st and 2nd Corps are urgently asked for assistance. Heth experiences delays in moving up, and doesn't arrive until late afternoon on the 15th. The sound of the fight reaches the long column of 1st and 2nd Corps before it has moved very far. The troops respond immediately. 2nd Corps moves east, arriving near Amissville late in the morning. 1st Corps continues north and moves through Orlean early in the morning on June 16th heading for Palmer's Crossroads. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps will arrive about noon on the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 161_30.scn, 161_7.scn, 161_106.scn, 161_18.scn, 161_42.scn

162. Trouble on the way north I (var. 36)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps move out to transit to the Valley on the evening of June 14th. 3rd Corps begins to move north June 15th to carry out its covering role. The move is barely underway before it runs into trouble in the form of strong Union resistance. Heth's division is ordered to hurry forward, and 1st and 2nd Corps are urgently asked for assistance. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th. The sound of the fight reaches the long column of 1st and 2nd Corps before it has moved very far. The troops respond immediately. 2nd Corps moves east, arriving near Amissville late in the morning. 1st Corps continues north and moves through Orlean early in the morning on June 16th heading for Palmer's Crossroads. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 162_26.scn, 162_25.scn, 162_116.scn, 162_84.scn, 162_27.scn

163. Offensive preparations interrupted III (var. 66)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate army is massing for its move to the Valley. 2nd Corps is deployed to the rear. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 2nd Corps responds in a timely fashion when the attack occurs. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 12th. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing centered on Ellis' Ford in an attempt to use the heavily wooded area between the Rappahannock and the Rapidan to conceal this movement. 2nd Corps has taken to the road but is experiencing delays along the way and may arrive substantially later than late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling via the road to Elkton in an attempt to conceal its movement from observation. Bad roads and poor staff work delay its progress. It begins arriving in the area of operations late in the afternoon on June 13th. 6th Corps is slated to follow, but lingers at Falmouth making sure the Confederate forces across the Rappahannock have dispersed prior to moving upstream. It is not till after nightfall on June 14th that the corps begins to arrive.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 163_68.scn, 163_135.scn, 163_212.scn, 163_113.scn, 163_206.scn

164. The unexpected II (var. 31)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate move to the Valley, delayed for several days, is about get underway. 2nd Corps is to the rear, ready to step out. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. 2nd Corps' response is delayed when the attack occurs. Heth is delayed, arriving in the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The army will cross the Rappahannock at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Lawson's Ford, aiming to turn the left of any Confederate forces along the river. One corps will demonstrate at Rappahannock Station in an effort to pin any rebel forces in that area.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 164_45.scn, 164_50.scn, 164_18.scn, 164_4.scn, 164_1.scn

165. The unexpected I (var. 13)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate move to the Valley, delayed for several days, is about get underway. 2nd Corps is to the rear, ready to step out. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. 2nd Corps' response is delayed when the attack occurs. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The army will advance along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to Culpeper and continue on this axis to the Rapidan.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 165_30.scn, 165_47.scn, 165_44.scn, 165_17.scn, 165_37.scn

166. A surprise from across the Rappahannock IV (var. 295)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia's 2nd Corps moved for the Valley on the 10th. 1st Corps is concentrated north of Culpeper. Anderson, the van of 3rd Corps, is due tomorrow morning. 2nd Corps is recalled after the Union attack begins and lives up to its reputation as foot cavalry by arriving on the turnpike to Amissville on the morning of the 13th - a serious hump. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing at Waterloo Bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs. 1st and 11th Corps failed to make good time on the tough march from the Falmouth area, and are still south of Warrenton. The southern of the two crossings will have some catching up to do. 2nd Corps has taken to the road but is experiencing delays along the way and may arrive substantially later than late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling via the road to Elkton in an attempt to conceal its movement from observation. It begins arriving in the area of operations at noon on June 13th. 6th Corps follows, with elements edging upstream even before the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg had dissipated. By late afternoon on June 14th the corps begins arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 166_608.scn, 166_706.scn, 166_642.scn, 166_836.scn, 166_25.scn

167. A surprise from across the Rappahannock III (var. 39)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia's 2nd Corps moved for the Valley on the 10th. 1st Corps is concentrated around Culpeper. Anderson, the van of 3rd Corps, is due tomorrow morning. 2nd Corps is recalled after the Union attack begins and by hard marching arrives on the turnpike to Amissville in the late morning of the 13th - no mean feat. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing south of Kelly's Ford. 2nd Corps has taken to the road and will arrive beginning in the late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling well away from the river using the road to Warrenton Junction in an attempt to avoid any interference in its progress from rebel forces. It begins arriving south of Warrenton Junction late in the afternoon of June 13th. 6th Corps follows, making good time, and forcing its march. In the dead of night on June 14th it makes its way towards Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 167_10.scn, 167_367.scn, 167_391.scn, 167_548.scn, 167_712.scn

168. A surprise from across the Rappahannock II (var. 556)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia's 2nd Corps moved for the Valley on the 10th. 1st Corps is concentrated south of Culpeper. Anderson, the van of 3rd Corps, is due tomorrow morning. 2nd Corps is recalled after the Union attack begins and lives up to its reputation as foot cavalry by arriving on the turnpike to Amissville on the morning of the 13th - a serious hump. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing at Lawson's Ford and points north. Both 1st and 11th Corps have had hard marches and may not be able to support the attack in a timely fashion. 2nd Corps has taken to the road and will arrive beginning in the late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling via the road to Elkton in an attempt to conceal its movement from observation. It begins arriving in the area of operations at noon on June 13th. 6th Corps follows, with elements edging upstream even before the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg had dissipated. By late afternoon on June 14th the corps begins arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 168_506.scn, 168_7.scn, 168_354.scn, 168_770.scn, 168_64.scn

169. A surprise from across the Rappahannock I (var. 119)
THE SOUTH: The Army of Northern Virginia's 2nd Corps moved for the Valley on the 10th. 1st Corps is concentrated around Culpeper. Anderson, the van of 3rd Corps, encounters delays along the road from Fredericksburg and may be substantially delayed from its expected arrival on the morning of the 13th. 2nd Corps is recalled after the Union attack begins and by hard marching arrives on the turnpike to Amissville in the late morning of the 13th - no mean feat. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad with a force covering the right flank crossing at Freeman's Ford. 2nd Corps has taken to the road and will arrive beginning in the late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling well away from the river using the road to Warrenton Junction in an attempt to avoid any interference in its progress from rebel forces. The march is not pushed with the vigor required, and it isn't until night on June 13th that the corps nears Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps follows, but delays its departure from the Falmouth area to make sure the Confederate forces have left Fredericksburg. It is not until early morning on June 15th that the corps approaches Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 169_18.scn, 169_531.scn, 169_414.scn, 169_188.scn, 169_288.scn

170. Trouble on the way north IV (var. 104)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps move out to transit to the Valley on the evening of June 14th. 3rd Corps begins to move north June 15th to carry out its covering role. The move is barely underway before it runs into trouble in the form of strong Union resistance. Heth's division is ordered to hurry forward, and 1st and 2nd Corps are urgently asked for assistance. Heth experiences delays in moving up, and doesn't arrive until late afternoon on the 15th. The sound of the fight reaches the long column of 1st and 2nd Corps before it has moved very far. The troops respond immediately. 2nd Corps moves east, arriving near Amissville late in the morning. 1st Corps continues north and moves through Orlean early in the morning on June 16th on the road to Cliff Mills. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 170_46.scn, 170_42.scn, 170_54.scn, 170_19.scn, 170_3.scn

171. The direct approach I (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are deployed in forward positions along the Rappahannock as the first stage in preparing a cordon defense of the river. So far only the area immediately upstream and downstream of Rappahannock Station are covered by infantry - cavalry covers the remainder of the new line. When the attack comes the Union is slow to respond. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 171_6.scn, 171_3.scn, 171_5.scn, 171_7.scn, 171_8.scn

172. Go deep and roll 'em up IV (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge in an extreme envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Warrenton Junction as the first forces in the defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 172_1.scn, 172_2.scn, 172_3.scn, 172_4.scn

173. Go deep and roll 'em up III (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge in an extreme envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed about three miles up the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bealeton as the first forces in the flexible defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 173_1.scn, 173_2.scn, 173_3.scn, 173_4.scn

174. Go deep and roll 'em up II (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge in an extreme envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, should arrive in the early afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton as the first forces in the forward defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 174_1.scn, 174_2.scn, 174_3.scn, 174_4.scn

175. Go deep and roll 'em up I (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge in an extreme envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are deployed in forward positions along the Rappahannock as the first stage in preparing a cordon defense of the river. So far only the area immediately upstream and downstream of Rappahannock Station are covered by infantry - cavalry covers the remainder of the new line. When the attack comes the Union is slow to respond. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 175_1.scn, 175_8.scn, 175_4.scn, 175_6.scn, 175_5.scn

176. Early Envelopment IV (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs in a moderate envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. The force crossing at Fauquier will be in a good position to counter any Union response to the river crossing. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, should arrive in the early afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Warrenton Junction as the first forces in the defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 176_1.scn, 176_2.scn, 176_3.scn, 176_4.scn

177. Early Envelopment III (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs in a moderate envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. The force crossing at Fauquier will be in a good position to counter any Union response to the river crossing. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed about three miles up the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bealeton as the first forces in the flexible defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 177_1.scn, 177_2.scn, 177_3.scn, 177_4.scn

178. Early Envelopment II (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs in a moderate envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. The force crossing at Fauquier will be in a good position to counter any Union response to the river crossing. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, should arrive in the early afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton as the first forces in the forward defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 178_1.scn, 178_2.scn, 178_3.scn, 178_4.scn

179. Early Envelopment I (var. 8)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock via Waterloo bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs in a moderate envelopment of the Union right. The hope is to proceed through Warrenton and take up defensive positions in the area around Manassas, forcing the Union into fighting an offensive battle. The force crossing at Fauquier will be in a good position to counter any Union response to the river crossing. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 11th. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are deployed in forward positions along the Rappahannock as the first stage in preparing a cordon defense of the river. So far only the area immediately upstream and downstream of Rappahannock Station are covered by infantry - cavalry covers the remainder of the new line. When the attack comes the Union is slow to respond. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 179_4.scn, 179_2.scn, 179_5.scn, 179_6.scn, 179_1.scn

180. Offensive preparations interrupted IV (var. 34)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate army is massing for its move to the Valley. 2nd Corps is deployed to the rear. 1st Corps has deployed near Culpeper providing a loose cover for the massing of the army. 2nd Corps responds in a timely fashion when the attack occurs. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, is delayed en route and won't arrive until late afternoon of the 12th. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing at Waterloo Bridge and Fauquier White Sulpher Springs. 1st and 11th Corps didn't make as good time as hoped for on the tough march from the Falmouth area, and are camped in the Warrenton area. The southern of the two crossings will have some catching up to do. 2nd Corps has taken to the road but is experiencing delays along the way and may arrive substantially later than late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling well away from the river using the road to Warrenton Junction in an attempt to avoid any interference in its progress from rebel forces. The march is not pushed with the vigor required, and it isn't until night on June 13th that the corps nears Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps follows, but delays its departure from the Falmouth area to make sure the Confederate forces have left Fredericksburg. It is not until early morning on June 15th that the corps approaches Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 180_211.scn, 180_140.scn, 180_65.scn, 180_215.scn, 180_51.scn

181. Offensive preparations interrupted II (var. 355)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate army is massing for its move to the Valley. 2nd Corps is deployed to the rear. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 2nd Corps responds in a timely fashion when the attack occurs. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, should arrive in the early afternoon of the 12th. TNE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing at Lawson's Ford and points north. 2nd Corps has taken to the road but is experiencing delays along the way and may arrive substantially later than late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling by the most direct route from Falmouth, and arriving early on June 13th. 6th Corps follows, with elements edging upstream even before the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg had dissipated. By noon on June 14th the corps arrives in the area of operations.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 181_230.scn, 181_53.scn, 181_300.scn, 181_45.scn, 181_325.scn

182. Offensive preparations interrupted I (var. 120)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate army is massing for its move to the Valley. 2nd Corps is deployed to the rear. 1st Corps has deployed near Culpeper providing a loose cover for the massing of the army. 2nd Corps responds in a timely fashion when the attack occurs. Anderson's division, the first of the troops from 3rd Corps, should arrive in the early afternoon of the 12th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted four corps upstream. They are positioned to try a crossing along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad with a force covering the right flank crossing at Freeman's Ford. 2nd Corps has taken to the road and will arrive beginning in the late afternoon of the 12th. 12th Corps moves north, traveling by the most direct route from Falmouth, and arriving early on June 13th. 6th Corps follows, with elements edging upstream even before the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg had dissipated. By noon on June 14th the corps arrives in the area of operations.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 182_91.scn, 182_186.scn, 182_133.scn, 182_110.scn, 182_178.scn

183. The unexpected IV (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate move to the Valley, delayed for several days, is about get underway. 2nd Corps is to the rear, ready to step out. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. 2nd Corps' response is delayed when the attack occurs. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The army is to attempt an envelopment of the Confederate lines via Waterloo Bridge and points further north. Other elements of the army will demonstrate near Rappahannock Station, and cross the river south of the main effort to provide a link with the enveloping force.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 183_39.scn, 183_3.scn, 183_30.scn, 183_60.scn, 183_51.scn

184. The unexpected III (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The Confederate move to the Valley, delayed for several days, is about get underway. 2nd Corps is to the rear, ready to step out. 1st Corps has deployed forward while covering the massing of the army. 3rd Corps awaits the arrival of Heth south of Culpeper. 2nd Corps responds in a timely fashion when the attack occurs. Heth is delayed, arriving in the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The army has shifted upriver. Only 6th Corps remains behind, observing the Confederate presence at Fredericksburg, and covering the supply base at Aquia Creek. The army will advance south of Kelly's Ford and attempt to get between any rebel forces that have made their way upstream and their supply source. One corps will demonstrate along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to pin any Confederate forces that are present in that region. 5th Corps, tasked to demonstrate near Rappahannock Station, experiences unanticipated problems and may be delayed. 6th Corps gets delayed moving upstream, not arriving until the morning of the 16th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 184_17.scn, 184_31.scn, 184_52.scn, 184_6.scn, 184_33.scn

185. Trouble on the way north II (var. 58)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps move out to transit to the Valley on the evening of June 14th. 3rd Corps begins to move north June 15th to carry out its covering role. The move is barely underway before it runs into trouble in the form of strong Union resistance. Heth's division is ordered to hurry forward, and 1st and 2nd Corps are urgently asked for assistance. Heth arrives in the early afternoon of the 15th. The sound of the fight reaches the long column of 1st and 2nd Corps before it has moved very far. The troops respond immediately. Both 1st and 2nd Corps continue north and move through Orlean early in the morning on June 16th on the road to Cliff Mills. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 185_4.scn, 185_25.scn, 185_80.scn, 185_68.scn, 185_16.scn

186. North of the rail line IV (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad in a move designed to flank any northern position along the Rappahannock. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the early afternoon of the 11th after making good time on the trek through the Wilderness from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Warrenton Junction as the first forces in the defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 186_1.scn, 186_2.scn, 186_3.scn, 186_4.scn

187. Smash the center III (var. 96)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance down the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a broad front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen both flanks of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 187_33.scn, 187_93.scn, 187_35.scn, 187_45.scn, 187_60.scn

188. Smash the center IV (var. 13)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance down the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a broad front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen both flanks of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps will arrive the in midmorning hours of the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 188_14.scn, 188_72.scn, 188_89.scn, 188_90.scn, 188_87.scn

189. Crush the Union left! IV (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps will arrive about noon on the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 189_63.scn, 189_10.scn, 189_22.scn, 189_36.scn, 189_92.scn

190. Crush the Union right! I (var. 34)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a broad front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen of the flank advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 190_90.scn, 190_89.scn, 190_23.scn, 190_30.scn, 190_35.scn

191. Crush the Union right! II (var. 53)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps will arrive the in midmorning hours of the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 191_22.scn, 191_68.scn, 191_96.scn, 191_82.scn, 191_53.scn

192. Crush the Union right! III (var. 89)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps will arrive the in midmorning hours of the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 192_16.scn, 192_20.scn, 192_58.scn, 192_15.scn, 192_23.scn

193. Crush the Union right! IV (var. 52)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 193_63.scn, 193_57.scn, 193_25.scn, 193_50.scn, 193_1.scn

194. Crush the Union left! III (var. 40)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a broad front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 194_45.scn, 194_95.scn, 194_15.scn, 194_38.scn, 194_90.scn

195. The direct approach II (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton as the first forces in the forward defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 195_1.scn, 195_2.scn, 195_3.scn, 195_4.scn

196. The direct approach III (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed about three miles up the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bealeton as the first forces in the flexible defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 196_1.scn, 196_2.scn, 196_3.scn, 196_4.scn

197. The direct approach IV (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Warrenton Junction as the first forces in the defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 197_1.scn, 197_2.scn, 197_3.scn, 197_4.scn

198. South of the rail line I (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are deployed in forward positions along the Rappahannock as the first stage in preparing a cordon defense of the river. So far only the area immediately upstream and downstream of Rappahannock Station are covered by infantry - cavalry covers the remainder of the new line. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 198_1.scn, 198_6.scn, 198_4.scn, 198_8.scn, 198_5.scn

199. South of the rail line II (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton as the first forces in the forward defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 199_1.scn, 199_2.scn, 199_3.scn, 199_4.scn

200. South of the rail line III (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the early afternoon of the 11th after making good time on the trek through the Wilderness from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed about three miles up the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bealeton as the first forces in the flexible defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 200_1.scn, 200_2.scn, 200_3.scn, 200_4.scn

201. South of the rail line IV (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the early afternoon of the 11th after making good time on the trek through the Wilderness from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Warrenton Junction as the first forces in the defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 201_1.scn, 201_2.scn, 201_3.scn, 201_4.scn

202. North of the rail line I (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad in a move designed to flank any northern position along the Rappahannock. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the early afternoon of the 11th after making good time on the trek through the Wilderness from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton awaiting additional forces before deploying forward along the river in a cordon defense. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. When the attack comes the Union is slow to respond. 1st and 11th Corps, already on the road, make poor time and arrive around noon on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps, delayed in its movement upstream, gets news of the rebel assault and moves as rapidly as possible, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. 12th Corps is delayed by 2nd Corps and doesn't arrive till the afternoon of June 13th. Sixth Corps fails to detect the movement of the last of the Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, and is late in moving upstream, not arriving until midmorning of June 14th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 202_6.scn, 202_4.scn, 202_7.scn, 202_5.scn, 202_8.scn

203. North of the rail line II (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad in a move designed to flank any northern position along the Rappahannock. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the late afternoon of the 11th after a massive traffic jam in the Wilderness during the move from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed near Bealeton as the first forces in the forward defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 203_1.scn, 203_2.scn, 203_3.scn, 203_4.scn

204. North of the rail line III (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: June 11th and the Army of Northern Virginia's 1st and 2nd Corps take the offensive, crossing the Rappahannock north of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad in a move designed to flank any northern position along the Rappahannock. Anderson's division, the van of 3rd Corps, arrives in the early afternoon of the 11th after making good time on the trek through the Wilderness from Fredericksburg. THE NORTH: Two corps of the Army of the Potomac have shifted upstream and are massed about three miles up the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bealeton as the first forces in the flexible defense in depth planned by army command. Cavalry screens the line of the Rappahannock. 1st and 11th Corps are already shifting north and make good time, arriving during the morning of the 11th on the road to Bealeton. 2nd Corps also responds arriving late on the 12th on the same road. 12th Corps gets under way upstream as news of the Confederate attack is received, arriving in the area of conflict early on June 13th. Sixth Corps moves out as the Confederate presence across the river from Falmouth wanes, and arrives late in the day on June 13th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 204_1.scn, 204_2.scn, 204_3.scn, 204_4.scn

205. The Sulpher Springs in June I (var. 21)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute an envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Waterloo Bridge. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. The southern portion of the offensive will be well situated to deal with any response to the attack that the Union makes. 3rd Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 205_29.scn, 205_43.scn, 205_2.scn, 205_3.scn, 205_12.scn

206. The Sulpher Springs in June II (var. 27)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute an envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Waterloo Bridge. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. The southern portion of the offensive will be well situated to deal with any response to the attack that the Union makes. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 206_21.scn, 206_16.scn, 206_43.scn, 206_45.scn, 206_27.scn

207. The Sulpher Springs in June III (var. 40)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute an envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Waterloo Bridge. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. The southern portion of the offensive will be well situated to deal with any response to the attack that the Union makes. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps will arrive the in midmorning hours of the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 207_4.scn, 207_22.scn, 207_29.scn, 207_20.scn, 207_1.scn

208. The Sulpher Springs in June IV (var. 26)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute an envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs and Waterloo Bridge. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. The southern portion of the offensive will be well situated to deal with any response to the attack that the Union makes. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps will arrive about noon on the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 208_7.scn, 208_8.scn, 208_6.scn, 208_11.scn, 208_45.scn

209. North of Waterloo Bridge I (var. 21)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute a deep envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. 3rd Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 209_25.scn, 209_31.scn, 209_46.scn, 209_23.scn, 209_22.scn

210. North of Waterloo Bridge II (var. 25)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute a deep envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 210_24.scn, 210_14.scn, 210_17.scn, 210_9.scn, 210_32.scn

211. North of Waterloo Bridge III (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute a deep envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. 3rd Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated along the road to Elkton, can respond. The distance from the river will provide flexibility in reacting to an attack. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 211_30.scn, 211_11.scn, 211_9.scn, 211_40.scn, 211_29.scn

212. North of Waterloo Bridge IV (var. 30)
THE SOUTH: 1st and 2nd Corps are poised to execute a deep envelopment of the Rappahannock line. They will cross at Waterloo Bridge and north. 3rd Corps is in reserve and will follow. It is hoped that this movement will force the Union into an offensive battle in the area of Manassas. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack. 5th Corps is near Bealeton and, along with a strong cavalry reserve, will act to further delay an advance until the main body, situated in the area around Warrenton Junction, can respond. At this distance from the river the main body of the army will be able to promptly react not only to an assault in the area of Rappahannock Station, but also to crossings further up the river. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps will arrive about noon on the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 212_38.scn, 212_30.scn, 212_21.scn, 212_34.scn, 212_43.scn

213. Smash the center I (var. 48)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance down the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen both flanks of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth is will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 213_29.scn, 213_5.scn, 213_56.scn, 213_72.scn, 213_95.scn

214. Smash the center II (var. 66)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance down the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen both flanks of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving early in the afternoon on the road to Warrenton Junction. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 214_94.scn, 214_34.scn, 214_92.scn, 214_40.scn, 214_73.scn

215. Crush the Union left! I (var. 86)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a narrow front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Heth will arrive via Germanna Ford during the early afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a cordon defense north of the Rappahannock. All fords are covered by strong infantry forces. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to stop any Confederate offensive as it crosses the river. Five corps are present with one of them held in reserve. The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving this morning on the road to Bealeton. 6th Corps is delayed in arriving and will not arrive until mid afternoon on the 16th on the road to Elkton.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 215_69.scn, 215_48.scn, 215_43.scn, 215_32.scn, 215_65.scn

216. Crush the Union left! II (var. 36)
THE SOUTH: The attack is planned to advance south of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad on a broad front. 1st and 2nd Corps will lead, with 3rd Corps in reserve. Cavalry will screen the flank of the advance with three brigades to accompany the advance. Third Corps' orders are misunderstood and it is late morning before it is available. Heth is delayed and will arrive via Germanna Ford during the late afternoon of the 15th. THE NORTH: The Union army has shifted upstream and is preparing a defense in depth north of the Rappahannock. The fords are covered by detached brigades which aim to delay any Confederate attack until the main body, situated near Bealeton, can respond. This forward deployment of the main body is intended to provide a quick reaction to an offensive, and a chance to crush the Confederate army "at the water's edge". The reorganized Cavalry Corps screens the flanks of the line, with particular attention paid to the area north of Lawson's Ford. Additionally, there is a strong central cavalry reserve. Five corps are present. 12th Corps has already started the movement to the new position, and will be arriving late in the morning on the Elkton Road. 6th Corps is delayed and will not arrive until late afternoon of the 16th on the road to Warrenton Junction.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 216_37.scn, 216_79.scn, 216_49.scn, 216_69.scn, 216_80.scn

217. On a collision course II (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 217_18.scn, 217_26.scn, 217_2.scn, 217_17.scn, 217_25.scn

218. On a collision course III (var. 11)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 218_29.scn, 218_15.scn, 218_36.scn, 218_11.scn, 218_33.scn

219. On a collision course IV (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 219_28.scn, 219_5.scn, 219_11.scn, 219_4.scn, 219_26.scn

220. On a collision course V (var. 20)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 220_5.scn, 220_6.scn, 220_4.scn, 220_8.scn, 220_33.scn

221. On a collision course VI (var. 9)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 221_9.scn, 221_14.scn, 221_35.scn, 221_18.scn, 221_8.scn

222. On a collision course VII (var. 22)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 222_9.scn, 222_11.scn, 222_13.scn, 222_7.scn, 222_25.scn

223. On a collision course VIII (var. 14)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 223_25.scn, 223_10.scn, 223_35.scn, 223_32.scn, 223_24.scn

224. On a collision course IX (var. 32)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 224_5.scn, 224_34.scn, 224_28.scn, 224_1.scn, 224_8.scn

225. On a collision course X (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 225_31.scn, 225_22.scn, 225_13.scn, 225_32.scn, 225_11.scn

226. On a collision course XI (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 226_1.scn, 226_11.scn, 226_34.scn, 226_10.scn, 226_36.scn

227. On a collision course XII (var. 25)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 227_29.scn, 227_11.scn, 227_3.scn, 227_1.scn, 227_33.scn

228. On a collision course XIII (var. 27)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 228_8.scn, 228_6.scn, 228_22.scn, 228_1.scn, 228_18.scn

229. On a collision course XIV (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 229_29.scn, 229_27.scn, 229_35.scn, 229_1.scn, 229_11.scn

230. On a collision course XV (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 230_16.scn, 230_17.scn, 230_24.scn, 230_31.scn, 230_27.scn

231. On a collision course XVI (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 231_4.scn, 231_14.scn, 231_27.scn, 231_5.scn, 231_19.scn

232. On a collision course XVII (var. 30)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 232_32.scn, 232_24.scn, 232_10.scn, 232_16.scn, 232_17.scn

233. On a collision course XVIII (var. 8)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 233_33.scn, 233_36.scn, 233_26.scn, 233_21.scn, 233_11.scn

234. On a collision course XIX (var. 35)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 234_28.scn, 234_27.scn, 234_2.scn, 234_5.scn, 234_7.scn

235. On a collision course XX (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 235_8.scn, 235_26.scn, 235_36.scn, 235_31.scn, 235_20.scn

236. On a collision course XXI (var. 3)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 236_34.scn, 236_35.scn, 236_14.scn, 236_33.scn, 236_36.scn

237. On a collision course XXII (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 237_25.scn, 237_32.scn, 237_11.scn, 237_20.scn, 237_2.scn

238. On a collision course XXIII (var. 14)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 238_1.scn, 238_16.scn, 238_35.scn, 238_22.scn, 238_34.scn

239. On a collision course XXIV (var. 17)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 239_24.scn, 239_27.scn, 239_9.scn, 239_35.scn, 239_30.scn

240. On a collision course XXV (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 240_23.scn, 240_21.scn, 240_1.scn, 240_16.scn, 240_33.scn

241. On a collision course XXVI (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 241_11.scn, 241_8.scn, 241_16.scn, 241_28.scn, 241_2.scn

242. On a collision course XXVII (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 242_7.scn, 242_35.scn, 242_5.scn, 242_22.scn, 242_18.scn

243. On a collision course XXVIII (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 243_29.scn, 243_30.scn, 243_17.scn, 243_31.scn, 243_34.scn

244. On a collision course XXIX (var. 26)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 244_20.scn, 244_13.scn, 244_35.scn, 244_5.scn, 244_4.scn

245. On a collision course XXX (var. 20)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 245_33.scn, 245_13.scn, 245_18.scn, 245_23.scn, 245_8.scn

246. On a collision course XXXI (var. 21)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 246_7.scn, 246_6.scn, 246_18.scn, 246_20.scn, 246_22.scn

247. On a collision course XXXII (var. 8)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 247_6.scn, 247_24.scn, 247_34.scn, 247_29.scn, 247_18.scn

248. On a collision course XXXIII (var. 17)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 248_32.scn, 248_33.scn, 248_11.scn, 248_31.scn, 248_34.scn

249. On a collision course XXXIV (var. 27)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 249_23.scn, 249_20.scn, 249_8.scn, 249_18.scn, 249_35.scn

250. On a collision course XXXV (var. 28)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 250_20.scn, 250_3.scn, 250_9.scn, 250_18.scn, 250_1.scn

251. On a collision course XXXVI (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 251_5.scn, 251_26.scn, 251_7.scn, 251_19.scn, 251_1.scn

252. On a collision course XXXVII (var. 33)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 252_10.scn, 252_18.scn, 252_13.scn, 252_26.scn, 252_14.scn

253. On a collision course XXXVIII (var. 27)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 253_17.scn, 253_6.scn, 253_14.scn, 253_18.scn, 253_15.scn

254. On a collision course XXXIX (var. 4)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 254_15.scn, 254_27.scn, 254_1.scn, 254_7.scn, 254_8.scn

255. On a collision course XL (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 255_31.scn, 255_12.scn, 255_8.scn, 255_29.scn, 255_30.scn

256. On a collision course XLI (var. 26)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 256_4.scn, 256_8.scn, 256_22.scn, 256_27.scn, 256_20.scn

257. On a collision course XLII (var. 1)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 257_32.scn, 257_28.scn, 257_29.scn, 257_31.scn, 257_21.scn

258. On a collision course XLIII (var. 16)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three balanced columns. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 258_17.scn, 258_22.scn, 258_34.scn, 258_16.scn, 258_27.scn

259. On a collision course XLIV (var. 15)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The northernmost has three corps in it and is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word of the Confederate attack reaches it. It has to make a long counter march to get to the area of crisis. The other two columns each are composed of one corps. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. The pleas find a surprisingly receptive audience, and Stahel's cavalry division is released, arriving on June 24th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 259_34.scn, 259_36.scn, 259_30.scn, 259_12.scn, 259_32.scn

260. On a collision course XLV (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The central column, moving towards Snicker's Gap has three corps in it, while the other two contain one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 260_1.scn, 260_36.scn, 260_23.scn, 260_15.scn, 260_29.scn

261. On a collision course XLVI (var. 36)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in three columns. The southern column, moving towards Ashby's Gap has three corps in it, the others have one corps each. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. A series of frustrating delays plague the column, and the lead elements don't begin arriving in the area until late in the afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 261_12.scn, 261_6.scn, 261_15.scn, 261_23.scn, 261_11.scn

262. On a collision course XLVII (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances a seemingly endless column along a northern route to the Valley. The van of the column is nearing Harper's Ferry by the time word gets to it that there is action to the rear. It's reverse march time at that point as the troops make the long march to the southeast. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. The river crossing takes longer than anyone expected and these units don't begin arriving in the area until mid afternoon on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army - to no avail. Panic in the capitol means no troops for the fight.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 262_1.scn, 262_28.scn, 262_11.scn, 262_17.scn, 262_26.scn

263. On a collision course XLVIII (var. 26)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in a seemingly endless column along a central route heading for Snicker's Gap. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. After several rounds of serious cajoling Stahel's cavalry division is reluctantly released, arriving on June 25th.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 263_16.scn, 263_29.scn, 263_15.scn, 263_32.scn, 263_8.scn

264. On a collision course XLIX (var. 16)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: Dawn on June 22nd finds the Union army moving for the Valley. Two corps have been detached and have crossed the Potomac and are advancing west. It's the cavalry, screening the advancing Union army, that has the first contact with rebel forces. Unfortunately this contact occurs long before the army reaches the Valley. The fight begins west of the Bull Run mountains. The infantry of the Army of the Potomac advances in one seemingly endless column heading for Ashby's Gap and the Valley. At the point in time when contact is made the infantry is still very close to the screening cavalry. The second cavalry division of the army, which was screening towards Harper's Ferry and operating in conjunction with the two corps shifted north of the Potomac arrives early on June 23rd. 6th and 11th Corps are called back from across the river, but face a river crossing and a tough march. These units don't begin arriving in the area until mid day on June 24th. In the crisis the army command begs Washington to free troops from its defenses for the field army. Stahel's cavalry division, which was already being considered as a reinforcement to the field army is released, arriving on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 264_15.scn, 264_7.scn, 264_5.scn, 264_1.scn, 264_14.scn

265. From out of the Valley I (var. 60)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. They react to the threat immediately upon learning of the rebel advance. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, doesn't learn of the brewing battle until frantic messages arrive from the Cavalry Corps commander. Once the corps receives this word it reacts immediately. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, the army command is tentative in its decision making, and this failing is compounded by partisan disruption of the telegraph lines and a consequent delay in forwarding orders. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and ordered to Warrenton via New Baltimore, remains at Warrenton for hours, not nearing the area of conflict until late afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, eventually moves north and west, making its appearance as dusk approaches. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, nearing the conflict at nightfall. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the morning of June 23rd. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until the afternoon of June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 265_5.scn, 265_40.scn, 265_15.scn, 265_32.scn, 265_41.scn

266. Caught in transition I (var. 23)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The army is equally divided among the three chosen lines of advance. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. All three corps wait for orders from army command before taking any action. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west. The corps command hesitates before deciding on a course of action. 1st Corps moves south from Leesburg as soon as it learns of the Confederate attack, arriving via the Leesburg pike in the mid afternoon on June 22nd. 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry must recross the Potomac. They encounter substantial delays in doing so, and don't begin arriving along the Leesburg pike until the afternoon of June 23rd. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters move forward from Fairfax Station in the mid afternoon on the 22nd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is released to the Army of the Potomac after much hand wringing by the powers that be in Washington, and arrives on the scene at late on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 266_12.scn, 266_30.scn, 266_56.scn, 266_58.scn, 266_10.scn

267. From out of the Valley II (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. They react to the threat immediately upon learning of the rebel advance. Further to the south 2nd Corps, through some strange atmospherics, hears the brewing fight almost from the first shot. In an admirable exercise of initiative the corps commander responds immediately from its encampment near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, word is slow in arriving. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and on its way to Warrenton via New Baltimore, actually reaches Warrenton prior to learning anything of events to the north and reverses field by early afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, moves north and west, making its appearance in the middle of the afternoon. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, making good time and nearing the conflict late in the afternoon. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the evening. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until mid day on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 267_70.scn, 267_4.scn, 267_41.scn, 267_11.scn, 267_57.scn

268. Caught in transition II (var. 36)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. Two flanking divisions move further south, one via Snicker's Gap, and the other via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. They respond immediately to the news, without waiting for orders from army command. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west. Immediately the corps command starts getting conflicting orders from army command. Its reaction is slowed as a result of these crossed signals. 1st Corps is caught in mid-crossing of the Potomac when it learns of the Confederate attack. By the time it can renegotiate the river it is too late to move south on June 22nd. It does so first thing on June 23rd, arriving via the Leesburg pike during the morning. Army command fears that 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry, will be cut off if they recross the Potomac at Edward's Ferry. Consequently these forces are routed all the way downstream, crossing at Washington and moving west. They don't begin to arrive till mid day on June 24th. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters dally around Fairfax Station before finally moving west on the morning of June 23rd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is retained in Washington by an increasingly nervous government.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 268_60.scn, 268_30.scn, 268_39.scn, 268_69.scn, 268_1.scn

269. From out of the Valley III (var. 77)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. The Cavalry Corps commander, in an act verging on criminal negligence, fails to send word of the rebel advance to these nearest available units. Eventually word of the advance filters back to them, but not without a substantial delay taking place. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, doesn't learn of the brewing battle until frantic messages arrive from the Cavalry Corps commander. Once the corps receives this word it reacts immediately. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, word is slow in arriving. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and on its way to Warrenton via New Baltimore, actually reaches Warrenton prior to learning anything of events to the north and reverses field by early afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, moves north and west, making its appearance in the middle of the afternoon. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, making good time and nearing the conflict late in the afternoon. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the evening. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until mid day on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 269_41.scn, 269_9.scn, 269_2.scn, 269_3.scn, 269_81.scn

270. Caught in transition III (var. 10)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves via Ashby's Gap. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. All three commands hesitate before reacting. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west, and marches to the action. 1st Corps moves south from Leesburg as soon as it learns of the Confederate attack, arriving via the Leesburg pike early in the afternoon on June 22nd. 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry recross the Potomac on the 22nd and begin arriving along the Leesburg pike early on June 23rd. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters move forward from Fairfax Station at noon on the 22nd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is released to the Army of the Potomac, and arrives on the scene at noon on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 270_52.scn, 270_28.scn, 270_17.scn, 270_29.scn, 270_76.scn

271. From out of the Valley IV (var. 53)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. The Cavalry Corps commander, in an act verging on criminal negligence, fails to send word of the rebel advance to these nearest available units. Eventually word of the advance filters back to them, but not without a substantial delay taking place. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, is not informed of the events to its north. It is not till later in the morning that the corps learns an attack has taken place and is able to react. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, word is slow in arriving. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and on its way to Warrenton via New Baltimore, actually reaches Warrenton prior to learning anything of events to the north and reverses field by early afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, moves north and west, making its appearance in the middle of the afternoon. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, making good time and nearing the conflict late in the afternoon. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the evening. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until mid day on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 271_73.scn, 271_51.scn, 271_76.scn, 271_81.scn, 271_5.scn

272. Caught in transition IV (var. 29)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. Most of the army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. A flanking division moves from Snicker's Gap east, and then, after giving Leesburg a wide berth, turns south, tasked with crossing Goose Creek well down stream from Aldie. Another flanking division moves directly east along the turnpike to Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. They respond immediately to the news, without waiting for orders from army command. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west, and marches to the action. 1st Corps moves south from Leesburg as soon as it learns of the Confederate attack, arriving via the Leesburg pike in the mid afternoon on June 22nd. 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry must recross the Potomac. They encounter substantial delays in doing so, and don't begin arriving along the Leesburg pike until the afternoon of June 23rd. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters move forward from Fairfax Station in the mid afternoon on the 22nd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is released to the Army of the Potomac after much hand wringing by the powers that be in Washington, and arrives on the scene at late on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 272_72.scn, 272_30.scn, 272_75.scn, 272_42.scn, 272_17.scn

273. From out of the Valley V (var. 9)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. They react to the threat immediately upon learning of the rebel advance. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, is not informed of the events to its north. It is not till later in the morning that the corps learns an attack has taken place and is able to react. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, the army command is tentative in its decision making, and this failing is compounded by partisan disruption of the telegraph lines and a consequent delay in forwarding orders. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and ordered to Warrenton via New Baltimore, remains at Warrenton for hours, not nearing the area of conflict until late afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, eventually moves north and west, making its appearance as dusk approaches. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, nearing the conflict at nightfall. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the morning of June 23rd. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until the afternoon of June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 273_14.scn, 273_77.scn, 273_28.scn, 273_13.scn, 273_80.scn

274. Caught in transition V (var. 16)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap, then turns east, giving Leesburg a wide berth, and finally turning south. The plan calls for crossing Goose Creek far down stream from Aldie. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. All three commands hesitate before reacting. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west. Immediately the corps command starts getting conflicting orders from army command. Its reaction is slowed as a result of these crossed signals. 1st Corps moves south from Leesburg as soon as it learns of the Confederate attack, arriving via the Leesburg pike early in the afternoon on June 22nd. 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry recross the Potomac on the 22nd and begin arriving along the Leesburg pike early on June 23rd. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters move forward from Fairfax Station at noon on the 22nd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is released to the Army of the Potomac, and arrives on the scene at noon on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 274_58.scn, 274_74.scn, 274_47.scn, 274_46.scn, 274_26.scn

275. From out of the Valley VI (var. 7)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. They react to the threat immediately upon learning of the rebel advance. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, is not informed of the events to its north. It is not till later in the morning that the corps learns an attack has taken place and is able to react. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and on its way to Warrenton via New Baltimore, moves north by late morning. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, moves north and west, making its appearance near noon. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, making good time and nearing the conflict by early afternoon. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the late afternoon. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. Even reacting rapidly it can't arrive before the morning of June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 275_2.scn, 275_45.scn, 275_80.scn, 275_18.scn, 275_40.scn

276. Caught in transition VI (var. 36)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Snicker's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. They respond immediately to the news, without waiting for orders from army command. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west. Immediately the corps command starts getting conflicting orders from army command. Its reaction is slowed as a result of these crossed signals. 1st Corps is caught in mid-crossing of the Potomac when it learns of the Confederate attack. By the time it can renegotiate the river it is too late to move south on June 22nd. It does so first thing on June 23rd, arriving via the Leesburg pike during the morning. Army command fears that 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry, will be cut off if they recross the Potomac at Edward's Ferry. Consequently these forces are routed all the way downstream, crossing at Washington and moving west. They don't begin to arrive till mid day on June 24th. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters dally around Fairfax Station before finally moving west on the morning of June 23rd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is retained in Washington by an increasingly nervous government.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 276_28.scn, 276_55.scn, 276_33.scn, 276_39.scn, 276_80.scn

277. From out of the Valley VII (var. 78)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for. Weather, poor staff work, and congestion along the route have all combined to seriously throw the schedule off. Most elements of the army will experience delay in their arrival. In many cases the delay will be of a serious nature. THE NORTH: The Cavalry Corps and a division of Fifth Corps foray towards Upperville on June 21st. The begin the return march that day. When the march resumes on the morning of June 22nd the column has company. Soon similar butternut clad company arrives in several different areas and a general fight is on. 3rd Corps, encamped near Gum Springs, and 1st Corps near Guilford Station are the first units to the rear to learn of the rebel presence. The Cavalry Corps commander, in an act verging on criminal negligence, fails to send word of the rebel advance to these nearest available units. Eventually word of the advance filters back to them, but not without a substantial delay taking place. Further to the south 2nd Corps, encamped near Gainesville and Thoroughfare Gap, doesn't learn of the brewing battle until frantic messages arrive from the Cavalry Corps commander. Once the corps receives this word it reacts immediately. The various components of the rest of the army, widely dispersed covering the many possible approaches to Washington, react as soon as word arrives. Unfortunately, the army command is tentative in its decision making, and this failing is compounded by partisan disruption of the telegraph lines and a consequent delay in forwarding orders. Stahel's cavalry division, on loan from the defenses of Washington and ordered to Warrenton via New Baltimore, remains at Warrenton for hours, not nearing the area of conflict until late afternoon. The remainder of 5th Corps, posted near Bristoe Station, eventually moves north and west, making its appearance as dusk approaches. 12th Corps, the northern linchpin of the Union line, moves south from Leesburg along the pike, nearing the conflict at nightfall. The army headquarters and Artillery Reserve, well to the rear at Fairfax Courthouse, begin arriving in the morning of June 23rd. 6th Corps is far to the south near Germantown. It doesn't arrive until the afternoon of June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 277_81.scn, 277_77.scn, 277_67.scn, 277_15.scn, 277_10.scn

278. Caught in transition VII (var. 44)
THE SOUTH: The southern army moves east from the Valley intent on striking the Army of the Potomac east of the Bull Run mountains. Early on June 22nd cavalry screening this move makes contact with Union forces further west than anticipated. The rebel infantry - just a short march to the rear - advances behind the cavalry screen. The entire army advances along the turnpike from Ashby's Gap. The movement from the Valley has not gone as smoothly as hoped for, and elements of the army may experience delays in their arrival. THE NORTH: By dawn on June 22nd the army is well into its shift of base to Frederick. One division of cavalry has already shifted north of the Potomac River to begin screening movement there. The one division south of the river is spread across a very wide front. There has been little activity is a couple of days and the feeling is that the rebel army is far away. Feelings are supplanted by fact early on the 22nd as cavalry and then infantry begin to pressure the Union horse. 2nd Corps, 3rd Corps, and 6th Corps are the first to learn of the Confederate advance. All three commands hesitate before reacting. 5th Corps, encamped around Guilford Station is informed by courier of events to its west. Immediately the corps command starts getting conflicting orders from army command. Its reaction is slowed as a result of these crossed signals. 1st Corps moves south from Leesburg as soon as it learns of the Confederate attack, arriving via the Leesburg pike in the mid afternoon on June 22nd. 11th and 12th Corps, along with a division of cavalry must recross the Potomac. They encounter substantial delays in doing so, and don't begin arriving along the Leesburg pike until the afternoon of June 23rd. The Artillery Reserve and army headquarters move forward from Fairfax Station in the mid afternoon on the 22nd. Stahel's division, which had just returned to Washington from the south side of the Union position, is released to the Army of the Potomac after much hand wringing by the powers that be in Washington, and arrives on the scene at late on June 23rd.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 278_3.scn, 278_37.scn, 278_75.scn, 278_4.scn, 278_78.scn

279. Winchester Redux I (var. 15)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move into the Valley. They cross the Shenandoah in three balanced columns, and continue west. They begin arriving in a continuous stream of blue along three mutually supporting routes shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They actually make too good time north of the river, and must reverse their march in order to move to the south side. Valuable time is lost and the force doesn't begin to arrive near Winchester until late in the morning on June 25th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is largely discounted initially by the Confederate command. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. By the time the army command recognizes the news of a northern advance is correct it is late in the game. The army counter marches as fast as it can, but by the morning of June 23rd only one corps of the army is back in the Winchester area awaiting the northern advance. The other two corps are moving as fast as possible to the area. While the single corps on the field attempts to hold the Union advance, the rest of the infantry rush down the pike from Martinsburg, arriving beginning in the early morning.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 279_21.scn, 279_23.scn, 279_2.scn, 279_14.scn, 279_15.scn

280. Winchester Redux II (var. 30)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move into the Valley. They cross the Shenandoah in three columns, with the majority of the forces concentrated in the northern column which advances south of Charleston. They begin arriving in three streams of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. Incredibly the commanders of these units fail to press forward with anything remotely approaching a sense of urgency. The corps don't begin to arrive near Winchester until dawn on June 26th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is completely written off as myth by the Confederate command. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. By the time the army command recognizes the news of a northern advance is correct the main body of the army is straddling the Potomac. The army counter marches as fast as it can, but by the morning of June 23rd the infantry has yet to arrive in the Winchester area. A long stream of butternut races south to counter the Union advance. The infantry of the army rushes south. Fearing the proximity of the Union army might interfere with the march the troops leave the Martinsburg pike and move well west before moving south, arriving around noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 280_12.scn, 280_18.scn, 280_15.scn, 280_2.scn, 280_11.scn

281. Winchester Redux III (var. 7)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move into the Valley. They cross the Shenandoah in three columns, with the majority of the forces concentrated in the central column which advances along the Snicker's Gap pike. They begin arriving in three streams of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They make good time in catching up with the main body of the army, arriving during the afternoon of June 24th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is largely discounted initially by the Confederate command. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. By the time the army command recognizes the news of a northern advance is correct it is late in the game. The army counter marches as fast as it can, but by the morning of June 23rd only one corps of the army is back in the Winchester area awaiting the northern advance. The other two corps are moving as fast as possible to the area. While the single corps on the field attempts to hold the Union advance, the rest of the infantry rush south. Fearing the proximity of the Union army might interfere with the march the troops leave the Martinsburg pike and move well west before moving south, arriving around noon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 281_11.scn, 281_23.scn, 281_4.scn, 281_30.scn, 281_24.scn

282. Winchester Redux IV (var. 12)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move into the Valley. They cross the Shenandoah in three columns, with the majority of the forces concentrated in the southern column which advances along the Ashby's Gap pike. They begin arriving in three streams of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They actually make too good time north of the river, and must reverse their march in order to move to the south side. Valuable time is lost and the force doesn't begin to arrive near Winchester until late in the morning on June 25th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is regarded as too vague to immediately act on. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. The army counter marches. By the morning of June 23rd two corps of the army are back in the Winchester area awaiting the northern advance with the third on its way. The two corps of infantry on the field attempt to hold the Union advance. One corps is deployed forward, with the rest of the infantry in reserve pending the development of the Union advance. The remaining infantry rushes down the pike from Martinsburg, arriving beginning in the early morning.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 282_4.scn, 282_10.scn, 282_9.scn, 282_12.scn, 282_3.scn

283. Winchester Redux V (var. 12)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move along a northerly route into the Valley. They cross the Shenandoah south of Charleston, and continue west in one massive column. They begin arriving in a continuous stream of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The stream continues for more than a day. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They actually make too good time north of the river, and must reverse their march in order to move to the south side. Valuable time is lost and the force doesn't begin to arrive near Winchester until late in the morning on June 25th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is regarded as too vague to immediately act on. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. The army counter marches. By the morning of June 23rd two corps of the army are back in the Winchester area awaiting the northern advance with the third on its way. The two corps of infantry on the field attempt to hold the Union advance. One corps is deployed forward, with the rest of the infantry in reserve pending the development of the Union advance. The remaining infantry rushes down the pike from Martinsburg, arriving beginning in the early morning.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 283_29.scn, 283_3.scn, 283_20.scn, 283_28.scn, 283_27.scn

284. Winchester Redux VI (var. 9)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move along a central route into the Valley. They cross the mountains east of the Shenandoah along the Snicker's Gap pike, and continue west in one massive column. They begin arriving in a continuous stream of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The stream continues for more than a day. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They make good time in catching up with the main body of the army, arriving during the afternoon of June 24th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is completely written off as myth by the Confederate command. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. By the time the army command recognizes the news of a northern advance is correct the main body of the army is straddling the Potomac. The army counter marches as fast as it can, but by the morning of June 23rd the infantry has yet to arrive in the Winchester area. A long stream of butternut races south to counter the Union advance. The infantry of the army rushes south. Fearing the proximity of the Union army might interfere with the march the troops leave the Martinsburg pike and move via Bunker's Hill, arriving in mid morning.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 284_13.scn, 284_15.scn, 284_17.scn, 284_12.scn, 284_27.scn

285. Winchester Redux VII (var. 16)
THE NORTH: The Union army begins its move on the Valley on June 20th. By late on the 22nd the army is nearing its goal. Resistance has steadily risen during the move west. The morning of June 23rd finds the Cavalry Corps, tasked with screening the army's advance, facing full scale opposition for the first time - a sure precursor to a ge3neral engagement. The five corps of infantry of the Army of the Potomac that are south of the river move along a southerly route into the Valley. They cross the mountains east of the Shenandoah along the Ashby's Gap pike, and continue west in one massive column. They begin arriving in a continuous stream of blue shortly after the cavalry begin feeling out the rebel position. The stream continues for more than a day. The two corps which had moved north of the Potomac have been ordered to recross the river. They actually make too good time north of the river, and must reverse their march in order to move to the south side. Valuable time is lost and the force doesn't begin to arrive near Winchester until late in the morning on June 25th. THE SOUTH: The army begins moving north from the Valley on June 20th. By the morning of the 21st, as it prepares to push aside some minor resistance along the Potomac River, the army gets word from the Cavalry Division of a Union move towards the Valley. The news comes is largely discounted initially by the Confederate command. The cavalry delays the Union advance through June 22nd, continuously updating the command on the status of the Union advance. By the time the army command recognizes the news of a northern advance is correct it is late in the game. The army counter marches as fast as it can, but by the morning of June 23rd only one corps of the army is back in the Winchester area awaiting the northern advance. The other two corps are moving as fast as possible to the area. While the single corps on the field attempts to hold the Union advance, the rest of the infantry rush south. Fearing the proximity of the Union army might interfere with the march the troops leave the Martinsburg pike and move via Bunker's Hill, arriving in mid morning.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 285_19.scn, 285_15.scn, 285_5.scn, 285_25.scn, 285_26.scn

286. Forcing the Potomac (var. 5)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved north from Winchester. The evening of June 18th finds it on the south banks of the Potomac River. The northern bank is occupied. The 19th brings the corps the challenge of a contested river crossing. Jenkins' brigade crosses the river north of the main body at McCoy's Ford. 2nd Corps is massed to cross at Falling Waters. THE NORTH: June 18th finds Milroy's division tasked with the unenviable job of covering the crossings of the Potomac north of Harper's Ferry. June 19th finds them put to the test.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 286_32.scn, 286_17.scn, 286_20.scn, 286_28.scn, 286_3.scn

287. The whole army moves north (var. 17)
THE SOUTH: 2nd Corps has moved north from Winchester. The evening of June 22nd finds it on the south banks of the Potomac River. The northern bank is occupied. The 23rd brings the corps the challenge of a contested river crossing. Jenkins' brigade crosses the river north of the main body at McCoy's Ford. 2nd Corps has deployed to cross the Potomac on a broad front at Sharpsburg, Falling Waters, and Williamsport. The remainder of the Army of Northern Virginia advances north along two routes and will be available to assist 2nd Corps if necessary. THE NORTH: June 18th finds Milroy's division tasked with the unenviable job of covering the crossings of the Potomac north of Harper's Ferry. June 19th finds them put to the test.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 287_28.scn, 287_5.scn, 287_29.scn, 287_20.scn, 287_19.scn

288. Probing westward (var. 13)
THE NORTH: With the army massing at Frederick, Maryland the command decides to probe to the west over South Mountain to get a more definite feel for Confederate dispositions. Cavalry with 1st Corps in support is ordered to advance on June 24th. By the morning of the 25th they have crossed South Mountain and move towards Sharpsburg. The action heats up as the day progresses. THE SOUTH: During the late afternoon of June 24th outposts report Union forces advancing on the South Mountain passes. Most of the cavalry of the army is still south of the Potomac River. The horse that is north of the river is moving aggressively into Pennsylvania. The majority of the army is concentrated near Hagerstown. One division of 3rd Corps is in the vicinity of Sharpsburg. It is this force that reports the Union movement on June 24th, and that initially opposes it on June 25th. Army command doesn't place much stock in the reports of June 24th. The news from the morning of June 25th that masses of infantry are advancing changes this view. Anderson's division is set in motion south from Hagerstown. The division takes the pike west of Antietam Creek hoping to cut the Union force's line of communication. The late start delays its arrival in the area of conflict until noon on June 25th. By noon army command is convinced that there is a substantial threat to the south. The final division of 3rd Corps is ordered to move south as fast as possible. The division takes the pike to the west of Antietam Creek, arriving in the late afternoon.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 288_4.scn, 288_11.scn, 288_7.scn, 288_8.scn, 288_2.scn

289. Along the southern flank (var. 6)
THE SOUTH: A cavalry brigade probing west over the mountains encounters Union horse east of Emmitsburg. The orders for the southern cavalry are clear - push aside any northern cavalry screen and develop information on the disposition of the Union army. The sound of battle to the south brings additional troopers to the aid of their brethren. A brigade moves south from the vicinity of Fairfield. THE NORTH: By June 27th part of the Cavalry Corps covers the passes over South Mountain. The remainder of the corps probes north on the east side of the mountains, seeking information on the location and plans of the rebel army. One of the brigade tasked with covering the northern flank of the army moves through Emmitsburg just before noon and rapidly becomes engaged with southern horse. As soon as the Union troopers clash with their southern counterparts word goes out for assistance. Another brigade responds from near Taneytown almost immediately The division commander, centrally located in support of his advance brigades, also responds.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 289_4.scn, 289_6.scn, 289_5.scn, 289_8.scn, 289_3.scn

290. Rebel infestation (var. 9)
THE SOUTH: It's June 27th and the southern horse, probing east and south in support of the army's march into Pennsylvania, has occupied Emmitsburg. At mid day Union cavalry rushing north tries to push back the Confederate force. The sound of battle to the brings additional troopers to the aid of their brethren. A brigade moves west from the vicinity of Taneytown. And another - this time with the division commander in tow - responds from the Gettysburg area. THE NORTH: Word that the rebel army is already in Pennsylvania causes an abrupt shift in direction for the Army of the Potomac. Cavalry shifts from probing westward to covering the northern flank of the army. Near noon on June 27th a brigade makes contact with rebel forces near Emmitsburg. As soon as the Union troopers clash with their southern counterparts word goes out for assistance. Another brigade, moving towards Taneytown, responds almost immediately. The division commander, centrally located in support of his advance brigades, also responds.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 290_2.scn, 290_6.scn, 290_4.scn, 290_9.scn, 290_1.scn

291. A hard row to hoe (var. 18)
THE SOUTH: The army advances along the pike from Chambersburg screened by the Cavalry Division. The division encounters resistance from Union horse and, by the evening of June 29th reports the presence of infantry support near Gettysburg. The huge column presses forward on June 30th, bringing on a general engagement. The infantry of the army, hindered by only having one road to advance over, and by the heat of the day, gets strung out as it completes the mountain crossing. It is mid day on July 1st before the entire army transits the mountains. THE NORTH: Cavalry clashes on June 29th are merely precursors to a general action which begins on June 30th. Two corps of the army with cavalry support are near Gettysburg. The rest of the army is spread out all the way back to Frederick. The forces present in the area will have to hold back the rising tide of Confederate forces until relief arrives. 12th Corps, defending the pike to Taneytown, is alerted to the action on the 29th, and is under orders to move to Gettysburg on the 30th. Word of the attack is delayed in being relayed to the rest of the army which is massed from Frederick, Maryland north. One the army moves it is beset by poor staff work, and incredible congestion on the route north. It's July 3rd before the entire army arrives in the area of conflict.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 291_18.scn, 291_7.scn, 291_8.scn, 291_24.scn, 291_11.scn

292. Down the pike they come (var. 12)
THE SOUTH: The entire army has moved via Greencastle and then down the pike on Emmitsburg. Cavalry leads the advance. It is this force that comes in contact with a Union force of all arms west of Emmitsburg during the morning of June 27th. The infantry is ordered to hasten it's march as the action quickly heats up. The infantry of the army has had a harder time in the mountain transit than the horse. It is strung out for miles along the pike, and late morning on June 28th finds it still arriving. THE NORTH: The van of the mixed arms force sent north to extend the Union lines is just approaching Emmitsburg when it encounters Confederate cavalry. The cavalry is soon augmented by infantry and the fight is on. 12th Corps, the third of the three infantry corps heading north, makes good time and follows hard on the heels of 1st and 11th Corps. Word of the fight brewing in northern Maryland rapidly reaches army command, and by mid afternoon the first elements of the rest of the Army of the Potomac begin arriving. Poor staff work and the jammed road net lead to inexcusable delays in the arrival of the remainder of the army.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 292_20.scn, 292_14.scn, 292_4.scn, 292_9.scn, 292_8.scn

293. Along the road to Westminster (var. 19)
THE SOUTH: The entire army has moved via Greencastle and then down the pike on Emmitsburg. Cavalry leads the advance. It is this force that comes in contact with Union cavalry west of Emmitsburg during the morning of June 27th. The infantry is ordered to hasten its march as the action quickly heats up. The infantry of the army has had a harder time in the mountain transit than the horse. It is strung out for miles along the pike The column jams and moves in fits and starts. Early evening on June 28th finds it still arriving. THE NORTH: As the cavalry, dispatched to screen to the north of the Union position around Frederick, approaches Emmitsburg it encounters Confederate cavalry. The cavalry is soon augmented by infantry and the fight is on. Three corps and the remainder of the Union cavalry are dispatched to Westminster to cover the approaches to Washington. The lead of this force begins arriving in the vicinity of Westminster in the late afternoon of June 27th. Word of the fight brewing in northern Maryland rapidly reaches army command, and by mid afternoon the first elements of the rest of the Army of the Potomac begin arriving.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 293_10.scn, 293_22.scn, 293_25.scn, 293_2.scn, 293_18.scn

294. Collision in Maryland (var. 2)
THE SOUTH: The entire army has moved via Greencastle and then down the pike on Emmitsburg. Cavalry leads the advance. It is this force that comes in contact with a Union force of all arms west of Emmitsburg during the morning of June 27th. The infantry is ordered to hasten it's march as the action quickly heats up. The call is answered. The infantry of the army has made good time in its mountain crossing, and arrives in a steady stream throughout the day. THE NORTH: The army advances in two columns from Frederick. Just as the van of the force is approaching Emmitsburg it encounters Confederate cavalry. The cavalry is soon augmented by infantry and the fight is on. 12th Corps, the third of the three infantry corps in the right column, makes good time and follows hard on the heels of 1st and 11th Corps. The left hand column's trailing corps, including the artillery reserve, have problems keeping pace with the head of the column. It's after dark on June 28th before the tail of the column makes its appearance.

Campaign Scenarios provided: 294_3.scn, 294_11.scn, 294_13.scn, 294_15.scn, 294_10.scn



APPENDIX E
Scenario lengths


Some folks like the shorter scenarios, so here is a breakdown of what is available sorted by length of scenario. The scenarios in the campaign folder should, in all but a very few cases, match the number of turns for the example in the main folder.

!HISTORICAL 1.1.1 Opening Fight - July 1st - Gettysburg.scn has 4 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2.2 Cemetery Hill - July 2nd - Gettysburg.scn has 4 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2.5 The Wheatfield - July 2nd - Gettysburg.scn has 4 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.1.3 Barlow and Early - July 1st - Gettysburg.scn has 5 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2.3 Devil's Den - July 2nd - Gettysburg.scn has 5 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.1.2 Oak Hill - July 1st - Gettysburg.scn has 6 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2.1 Culps Hill - July 2nd - Gettysburg.scn has 6 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.3.4 Cavalry South - July 3rd - Gettysburg.scn has 6 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2.4 Little Round Top - July 2nd - Gettysburg.scn has 7 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.3.3 Picketts charge - July 3rd - Gettysburg.scn has 9 turns
!HISTORICAL 4. Aldie - June 17, 1863.scn has 12 turns
065. Probing at Sharpsburg (var. 3).scn has 12 turns
068. Along the pike (var. 4).scn has 12 turns
069. The northern approaches (var. 1).scn has 12 turns
102. Skirmish near Gettysburg (var. 5).scn has 12 turns
006. The Raid, June 29, 1863 (var. 13).scn has 13 turns
038. Gregg moves west (var. 6).scn has 15 turns
063. Encounters along South Mountain I (var. 6).scn has 15 turns
064. Encounters along South Mountain III (var. 2).scn has 15 turns
067. Encounters along South Mountain II (var. 2).scn has 15 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2 Gettysburg - July 2, 1863.scn has 17 turns
081. Cavalry skirmishes (var. 32).scn has 18 turns
289. Along the southern flank (var. 6).scn has 18 turns
290. Rebel infestation (var. 9).scn has 18 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.3.1 Cavalry East - July 3rd - Gettysburg.scn has 19 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.3.2 Culps Hill - July 3rd - Gettysburg.scn has 20 turns
004. Sharpsburg, June 25, 1863 (var. 21).scn has 24 turns
288. Probing westward (var. 13).scn has 27 turns
090. Block the Crossings (var. 3).scn has 37 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.1 Gettysburg - July 1, 1863.scn has 44 turns
037. 2nd Corps moves west (var. 5).scn has 46 turns
040. An interrupted shift to the west (var. 10).scn has 46 turns
001. The Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 47 turns
!HISTORICAL 2. Brandy Station - June 9.scn has 47 turns
022. Crush the Rear Guard (var. 3).scn has 48 turns
031. Falling Waters, July 13, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 49 turns
286. Forcing the Potomac (var. 5).scn has 49 turns
287. The whole army moves north (var. 17).scn has 49 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.2a Gettysburg - July 2, 1863 5 am.scn has 53 turns
!HISTORICAL 1.3 Gettysburg - July 3, 1863 4 am.scn has 54 turns
028. Stand in Pennsylvania (var. 7).scn has 68 turns
029. Delay near Gettysburg (var. 3).scn has 68 turns
030. Halt the Pursuit (var. 2).scn has 68 turns
117. Defense of the Gaps (var. 29).scn has 72 turns
005. Aldie, June 17, 1863 (var. 4).scn has 72 turns
003. The Second Battle of Winchester, June 13, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 86 turns
010. Scrap east of the mountains (var. 23).scn has 86 turns
!HISTORICAL 3. Second Winchester - June 13 - 14.scn has 86 turns
026. Storm the rear guard (var. 15).scn has 89 turns
032. The long road south (var. 42).scn has 89 turns
155. Link up with 2nd Corps (var. 3).scn has 104 turns
203. North of the rail line II (var. 3).scn has 104 turns
008. Falling Waters, July 12, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 106 turns
002. Race to the River (var. 5).scn has 156 turns
024. On to Virginia II (var. 5).scn has 156 turns
025. On to Virginia I (var. 4).scn has 156 turns
027. Cover the Crossing (var. 5).scn has 156 turns
!HISTORICAL 1. Gettysburg - July 1 - 3, 1863.scn has 156 turns
007. The Battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 158 turns
011. July 8th, Counterstroke (var. 1).scn has 158 turns
012. July 7th, Rapid Pursuit (var. 1).scn has 158 turns
039. The north wins the race (var. 15).scn has 158 turns
291. A hard row to hoe (var. 18).scn has 158 turns
148. By the right flank (var. 3).scn has 160 turns
150. Attack on a broad front (var. 2).scn has 160 turns
151. Envelopment on the Rappahannock (var. 8).scn has 160 turns
152. South of Kelly's Ford (var. 5).scn has 160 turns
154. The move north (var. 37).scn has 160 turns
187. Smash the center III (var. 96).scn has 160 turns
188. Smash the center IV (var. 13).scn has 160 turns
189. Crush the Union left! IV (var. 3).scn has 160 turns
190. Crush the Union right! I (var. 34).scn has 160 turns
191. Crush the Union right! II (var. 53).scn has 160 turns
192. Crush the Union right! III (var. 89).scn has 160 turns
193. Crush the Union right! IV (var. 52).scn has 160 turns
194. Crush the Union left! III (var. 40).scn has 160 turns
205. The Sulpher Springs in June I (var. 21).scn has 160 turns
206. The Sulpher Springs in June II (var. 27).scn has 160 turns
207. The Sulpher Springs in June III (var. 40).scn has 160 turns
208. The Sulpher Springs in June IV (var. 26).scn has 160 turns
209. North of Waterloo Bridge I (var. 21).scn has 160 turns
210. North of Waterloo Bridge II (var. 25).scn has 160 turns
211. North of Waterloo Bridge III (var. 11).scn has 160 turns
212. North of Waterloo Bridge IV (var. 30).scn has 160 turns
213. Smash the center I (var. 48).scn has 160 turns
214. Smash the center II (var. 66).scn has 160 turns
215. Crush the Union left! I (var. 86).scn has 160 turns
216. Crush the Union left! II (var. 36).scn has 160 turns
033. Falling Waters, July 11, 1863 (var. 1).scn has 162 turns
013. Stand on Pipe Creek (var. 65).scn has 176 turns
014. North of Westminster (var. 60).scn has 176 turns
015. Push the Pursuit (var. 29).scn has 176 turns
016. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Attack Across the Front (var. 3).scn has 179 turns
017. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Crush the Center (var. 3).scn has 179 turns
018. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Assault the Left (var. 1).scn has 179 turns
019. Stand on Big Pipe Creek - Assault the Right (var. 3).scn has 179 turns
009. Pipe Creek Assault - Right (var. 1).scn has 191 turns
020. Pipe Creek Assault - Balanced (var. 1).scn has 191 turns
021. Pipe Creek Assault - Left (var. 1).scn has 191 turns
023. Pipe Creek Assault - Center (var. 1).scn has 191 turns
035. An avalanche heads south (var. 88).scn has 198 turns
054. Dug in and waiting (var. 1).scn has 200 turns
074. No half measures (var. 2).scn has 200 turns
075. Concentrated advance (var. 2).scn has 200 turns
076. The whole army moves north (var. 4).scn has 200 turns
144. South of Gettysburg III (var. 1).scn has 200 turns
145. South of Gettysburg IV (var. 2).scn has 200 turns
146. South of Gettysburg I (var. 1).scn has 200 turns
147. South of Gettysburg II (var. 3).scn has 200 turns
034. Entrenched along Pipe Creek I (var. 12).scn has 202 turns
292. Down the pike they come (var. 12).scn has 205 turns
293. Along the road to Westminster (var. 19).scn has 205 turns
294. Collision in Maryland (var. 2).scn has 205 turns
153. The mountain line II (var. 18).scn has 212 turns
156. The attack from the west (var. 122).scn has 212 turns
157. The attack from the west and south I (var. 56).scn has 212 turns
158. The attack from the west and south II (var. 20).scn has 212 turns
159. Assault on Bull Run (var. 1).scn has 212 turns
062. Meeting engagement! II (var. 7).scn has 213 turns
071. Massed along the pike II (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
072. Three approaches I (var. 4).scn has 213 turns
073. Massed along the pike I (var. 10).scn has 213 turns
077. Meeting engagement! IV (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
078. Meeting engagement! III (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
085. Three approaches III (var. 1).scn has 213 turns
086. Massed along the pike III (var. 7).scn has 213 turns
087. Three approaches II (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
088. Meeting engagement! I (var. 7).scn has 213 turns
101. Entrenched along Pipe Creek IV (var. 10).scn has 213 turns
105. Entrenched along Pipe Creek II (var. 7).scn has 213 turns
106. Attack from the west VI (var. 85).scn has 213 turns
107. Entrenched along Pipe Creek V (var. 15).scn has 213 turns
108. Entrenched along Pipe Creek III (var. 5).scn has 213 turns
109. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVII (var. 26).scn has 213 turns
110. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIX (var. 18).scn has 213 turns
111. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XX (var. 14).scn has 213 turns
112. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXI (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
113. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXII (var. 3).scn has 213 turns
114. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXIV (var. 8).scn has 213 turns
115. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXV (var. 5).scn has 213 turns
116. Attack from the east III (var. 152).scn has 213 turns
120. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VII (var. 6).scn has 213 turns
121. Entrenched along Pipe Creek IX (var. 2).scn has 213 turns
122. Entrenched along Pipe Creek X (var. 3).scn has 213 turns
123. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VIII (var. 9).scn has 213 turns
124. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XI (var. 4).scn has 213 turns
125. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XII (var. 1).scn has 213 turns
126. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIII (var. 15).scn has 213 turns
127. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XIV (var. 18).scn has 213 turns
128. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XV (var. 15).scn has 213 turns
129. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVI (var. 23).scn has 213 turns
130. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XVIII (var. 3).scn has 213 turns
131. Entrenched along Pipe Creek XXIII (var. 2).scn has 213 turns
132. Attack from the east I (var. 228).scn has 213 turns
133. Attack from the west II (var. 85).scn has 213 turns
134. Attack from the east II (var. 120).scn has 213 turns
135. Attack from the west I (var. 17).scn has 213 turns
136. Entrenched along Pipe Creek VI (var. 20).scn has 213 turns
137. Attack from the west III (var. 172).scn has 213 turns
139. Attack from the east IV (var. 11).scn has 213 turns
140. Attack from the east V (var. 91).scn has 213 turns
141. Attack from the east VI (var. 29).scn has 213 turns
142. Attack from the west IV (var. 38).scn has 213 turns
143. Attack from the west V (var. 67).scn has 213 turns
149. On a collision course I (var. 34).scn has 216 turns
161. Trouble on the way north III (var. 95).scn has 216 turns
162. Trouble on the way north I (var. 36).scn has 216 turns
163. Offensive preparations interrupted III (var. 66).scn has 216 turns
164. The unexpected II (var. 31).scn has 216 turns
165. The unexpected I (var. 13).scn has 216 turns
166. A surprise from across the Rappahannock IV (var. 295).scn has 216 turns
167. A surprise from across the Rappahannock III (var. 39).scn has 216 turns
168. A surprise from across the Rappahannock II (var. 556).scn has 216 turns
169. A surprise from across the Rappahannock I (var. 119).scn has 216 turns
170. Trouble on the way north IV (var. 104).scn has 216 turns
171. The direct approach I (var. 5).scn has 216 turns
172. Go deep and roll 'em up IV (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
173. Go deep and roll 'em up III (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
174. Go deep and roll 'em up II (var. 2).scn has 216 turns
175. Go deep and roll 'em up I (var. 5).scn has 216 turns
176. Early Envelopment IV (var. 1).scn has 216 turns
177. Early Envelopment III (var. 3).scn has 216 turns
178. Early Envelopment II (var. 2).scn has 216 turns
179. Early Envelopment I (var. 8).scn has 216 turns
180. Offensive preparations interrupted IV (var. 34).scn has 216 turns
181. Offensive preparations interrupted II (var. 355).scn has 216 turns
182. Offensive preparations interrupted I (var. 120).scn has 216 turns
183. The unexpected IV (var. 23).scn has 216 turns
184. The unexpected III (var. 10).scn has 216 turns
185. Trouble on the way north II (var. 58).scn has 216 turns
186. North of the rail line IV (var. 1).scn has 216 turns
195. The direct approach II (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
196. The direct approach III (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
197. The direct approach IV (var. 3).scn has 216 turns
198. South of the rail line I (var. 6).scn has 216 turns
199. South of the rail line II (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
200. South of the rail line III (var. 2).scn has 216 turns
201. South of the rail line IV (var. 2).scn has 216 turns
202. North of the rail line I (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
204. North of the rail line III (var. 1).scn has 216 turns
217. On a collision course II (var. 11).scn has 216 turns
218. On a collision course III (var. 11).scn has 216 turns
219. On a collision course IV (var. 6).scn has 216 turns
220. On a collision course V (var. 20).scn has 216 turns
221. On a collision course VI (var. 9).scn has 216 turns
222. On a collision course VII (var. 22).scn has 216 turns
223. On a collision course VIII (var. 14).scn has 216 turns
224. On a collision course IX (var. 32).scn has 216 turns
225. On a collision course X (var. 18).scn has 216 turns
226. On a collision course XI (var. 7).scn has 216 turns
227. On a collision course XII (var. 25).scn has 216 turns
228. On a collision course XIII (var. 27).scn has 216 turns
229. On a collision course XIV (var. 23).scn has 216 turns
230. On a collision course XV (var. 29).scn has 216 turns
231. On a collision course XVI (var. 6).scn has 216 turns
232. On a collision course XVII (var. 30).scn has 216 turns
233. On a collision course XVIII (var. 8).scn has 216 turns
234. On a collision course XIX (var. 35).scn has 216 turns
235. On a collision course XX (var. 3).scn has 216 turns
236. On a collision course XXI (var. 3).scn has 216 turns
237. On a collision course XXII (var. 29).scn has 216 turns
238. On a collision course XXIII (var. 14).scn has 216 turns
239. On a collision course XXIV (var. 17).scn has 216 turns
240. On a collision course XXV (var. 5).scn has 216 turns
241. On a collision course XXVI (var. 5).scn has 216 turns
242. On a collision course XXVII (var. 7).scn has 216 turns
243. On a collision course XXVIII (var. 2).scn has 216 turns
244. On a collision course XXIX (var. 26).scn has 216 turns
245. On a collision course XXX (var. 20).scn has 216 turns
246. On a collision course XXXI (var. 21).scn has 216 turns
247. On a collision course XXXII (var. 8).scn has 216 turns
248. On a collision course XXXIII (var. 17).scn has 216 turns
249. On a collision course XXXIV (var. 27).scn has 216 turns
250. On a collision course XXXV (var. 28).scn has 216 turns
251. On a collision course XXXVI (var. 15).scn has 216 turns
252. On a collision course XXXVII (var. 33).scn has 216 turns
253. On a collision course XXXVIII (var. 27).scn has 216 turns
254. On a collision course XXXIX (var. 4).scn has 216 turns
255. On a collision course XL (var. 23).scn has 216 turns
256. On a collision course XLI (var. 26).scn has 216 turns
257. On a collision course XLII (var. 1).scn has 216 turns
258. On a collision course XLIII (var. 16).scn has 216 turns
259. On a collision course XLIV (var. 15).scn has 216 turns
260. On a collision course XLV (var. 10).scn has 216 turns
261. On a collision course XLVI (var. 36).scn has 216 turns
262. On a collision course XLVII (var. 29).scn has 216 turns
263. On a collision course XLVIII (var. 26).scn has 216 turns
264. On a collision course XLIX (var. 16).scn has 216 turns
265. From out of the Valley I (var. 60).scn has 216 turns
266. Caught in transition I (var. 23).scn has 216 turns
267. From out of the Valley II (var. 29).scn has 216 turns
268. Caught in transition II (var. 36).scn has 216 turns
269. From out of the Valley III (var. 77).scn has 216 turns
270. Caught in transition III (var. 10).scn has 216 turns
271. From out of the Valley IV (var. 53).scn has 216 turns
272. Caught in transition IV (var. 29).scn has 216 turns
273. From out of the Valley V (var. 9).scn has 216 turns
274. Caught in transition V (var. 16).scn has 216 turns
275. From out of the Valley VI (var. 7).scn has 216 turns
276. Caught in transition VI (var. 36).scn has 216 turns
277. From out of the Valley VII (var. 78).scn has 216 turns
278. Caught in transition VII (var. 44).scn has 216 turns
279. Winchester Redux I (var. 15).scn has 216 turns
280. Winchester Redux II (var. 30).scn has 216 turns
281. Winchester Redux III (var. 7).scn has 216 turns
282. Winchester Redux IV (var. 12).scn has 216 turns
283. Winchester Redux V (var. 12).scn has 216 turns
284. Winchester Redux VI (var. 9).scn has 216 turns
285. Winchester Redux VII (var. 16).scn has 216 turns
051. Concentration faced by opposition (var. 3).scn has 224 turns
052. Rebels in Gettysburg! (var. 7).scn has 224 turns
070. A belated move north (var. 2).scn has 224 turns
079. From out of the west III (var. 124).scn has 232 turns
080. From out of the west I (var. 29).scn has 232 turns
089. From out of the west II (var. 196).scn has 232 turns
092. From out of the west IV (var. 134).scn has 232 turns
093. From out of the west V (var. 102).scn has 232 turns
094. From out of the west VI (var. 117).scn has 232 turns
095. From out of the west VII (var. 78).scn has 232 turns
096. From out of the west VIII (var. 17).scn has 232 turns
097. From out of the west IX (var. 71).scn has 232 turns
098. From out of the west X (var. 282).scn has 232 turns
099. From out of the west XI (var. 18).scn has 232 turns
100. From out of the west XII (var. 113).scn has 232 turns
160. The mountain line I (var. 7).scn has 232 turns
103. The Crisis is at Hand I (var. 5).scn has 241 turns
104. The Crisis is at Hand II (var. 13).scn has 241 turns
119. Shift east and north (var. 3).scn has 243 turns
138. Block the advance (var. 115).scn has 243 turns
036. Only half prepared III (var. 4).scn has 272 turns
041. Only half prepared I (var. 2).scn has 272 turns
042. Only half prepared IV (var. 16).scn has 272 turns
043. Armageddon on the Potomac I (var. 11).scn has 272 turns
044. Armageddon on the Potomac II (var. 1).scn has 272 turns
045. Armageddon on the Potomac III (var. 10).scn has 272 turns
046. Armageddon on the Potomac IV (var. 2).scn has 272 turns
047. Preparations cut short I (var. 2).scn has 272 turns
048. Preparations cut short II (var. 13).scn has 272 turns
049. Preparations cut short III (var. 5).scn has 272 turns
050. Preparations cut short IV (var. 1).scn has 272 turns
053. Marengo in the heartland I (var. 9).scn has 272 turns
055. Marengo in the heartland III (var. 28).scn has 272 turns
056. Only half prepared II (var. 7).scn has 272 turns
057. Marengo in the heartland IV (var. 32).scn has 272 turns
058. Marengo in the heartland V (var. 5).scn has 272 turns
059. Marengo in the heartland VI (var. 19).scn has 272 turns
060. Marengo in the heartland VII (var. 19).scn has 272 turns
061. Marengo in the heartland VIII (var. 46).scn has 272 turns
066. Marengo in the heartland II (var. 24).scn has 272 turns
082. The fight north I (var. 20).scn has 272 turns
091. The fight north II (var. 29).scn has 272 turns
118. Festung Potomac (var. 10).scn has 272 turns
083. Hasty movement (var. 66).scn has 301 turns
084. From the four corners they come (var. 203).scn has 301 turns

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